Snatch Grip Deadlift – An Entire Guide With Form Tips

 

How to Determine Your SNATCH GRIP Width // Torokhtiy’s Snatch MasterClass

Video taken from the channel: Oleksiy TOROKHTIY


 

How to Do a Snatch Grip Deadlift by Wodstar

Video taken from the channel: Wodstar


 

Dmitry Klokov 260x3 Deadlift… snatch grip

Video taken from the channel: CoachMrFoster


 

Snatch-grip Deadlift

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Increase Your Deadlift: How To Snatch Grip Deadlift

Video taken from the channel: Alan Thrall


 

How To Do A Snatch Grip Deadlift With Eugene Teo

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Snatch Grip Deadlift | A Complete Guide With Form Tips | Tiger Fitness

Video taken from the channel: Tiger Fitness


The snatch is an Olympic lift that develops explosiveness, power, and challenges mobility. The snatch grip deadlift (SGDL) combines the movement pattern of the deadlift and the grip used during a full snatch. This is a quick, explosive movement in which you pull the bar off the floor and lockout at the hips. A snatch grip deadlift is an advanced variation of the traditional deadlift. The snatch grip is done with a wider grip on the barbell.

Some weight lifters prefer a wider snatch grip. Snatch Grip Deadlift Set Up Step 1: With you feet about hip width apart, step up to a barbell (on the ground) a place the feet slightly outwards. The barbell.

The snatch grip deadlift is a popular compound lift that is used in Olympic weightlifting. This lift primarily targets the hamstrings, but it also works the forearms (for gripping the bar), the glutes, hamstrings, quadriceps, traps and lower back. This deadlift is. Before setting for the snatch grip deadlift, achieve a stance that is slightly wider than your conventional deadlift stance and angle the feet out, splay the toes, and grip the floor. Snatch Grip Deadlift Tips You MUST keep the crease of the armpit over the bar and the midfoot to allow the bar to travel linearly.

Given the grip width, you may need to incorporate straps when the weight becomes significant. The deadlift is a hinge, not a squat. Snatch Grip Deadlift Tips Strength Workout (SWOD) 5/5/3/1 Snatch Grip Deadlift (65, 75, 85, 95-105%) Coach’s Corner Because the wider bar grip stresses the upper back more, it’s that much more important to stay rigid and keep that whole area in tact. When the upper back fails, the shoulders and eventually the lower back will round and cause potentially dangerous failure. If your conventional deadlift is above 350 pounds for reps, it’s best to learn the snatch-grip deadlift using 225 pounds for sets of 5. If you deadlift less, adjust accordingly.

The weight on the bar should only be ramped up after you’ve built the mobility to use maximum grip width and have built the upper back strength to support a good position. That said, snatch-grip deadlifts are a rare instance where I’ll allow an athlete to use straps. A Word of Caution Many lifters don’t have the ankle, hip, or thoracic mobility to get into the proper position for this exercise, and many resort to lifting with a rounded back. The snatch grip deadlift fuses the movement pattern of the conventional deadlift with the grip used during a full snatch. This makes for quick, explosive movement where you pull the bar off the floor and lockout at the hip.

Because of the wider grip that must be used in the snatch grip deadlift, you must drop into a deeper starting position.

List of related literature:

Sufficient conditioning for the upper extremities such as the shoulder and elbow will help assist in stabilising the bar overhead during the snatch and jerk.

“Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance” by Anthony Turner
from Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance
by Anthony Turner
Taylor & Francis, 2018

To recap: place the feet and grip shoulder-width apart, grip the bar like the bench press, keep the back neutral, descend straight to the clavicles, tilt the head back while looking forward, raise the bar along the same path, shift the torso forward slightly, squeeze the glutes, and lock out.

“Thinner Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Female Body” by Michael Matthews
from Thinner Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Female Body
by Michael Matthews
Oculus Publishers, 2019

Tip: Be careful when lowering the bar to your shoulders as the wide grip puts your shoulders in a more vulnerable position.

“Men's Health Power Training: Build Bigger, Stronger Muscles Through Performance-Based Conditioning” by Robert Dos Remedios, Michael Boyle, Editors of Men's Health Magazi
from Men’s Health Power Training: Build Bigger, Stronger Muscles Through Performance-Based Conditioning
by Robert Dos Remedios, Michael Boyle, Editors of Men’s Health Magazi
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2007

Note: For the proper width of the snatch grip, I suggest this rather critical notion: Grip the bar so that if things get sketchy, you can dump the weight behind your back and keep it from smashing into your skull.

“Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance” by Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza
from Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance
by Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza
Victory Belt Publishing, 2015

(glutes, hamstrings, quads, lower back, upper back, trapezius) Stand the same way you did to begin the clean and press, only this time, use a snatch grip (at least twice shoulder width).

“Scrawny to Brawny: The Complete Guide to Building Muscle the Natural Way” by Michael Mejia, John Berardi
from Scrawny to Brawny: The Complete Guide to Building Muscle the Natural Way
by Michael Mejia, John Berardi
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2005

The snatch grip deadlift is really just a deadlift done with very wide grip.

“Glute Lab: The Art and Science of Strength and Physique Training” by Bret Contreras, Glen Cordoza
from Glute Lab: The Art and Science of Strength and Physique Training
by Bret Contreras, Glen Cordoza
Victory Belt Publishing, 2019

Avoid these common mistakes: using a grip that is too narrow, letting the elbows Squeeze intoo closetothebody instead of flaring out, finishing the exercise with the upper body above parallel to the floor, not arching the low back, and locking the knees.

“Natural Bodybuilding” by John Hansen
from Natural Bodybuilding
by John Hansen
Human Kinetics, 2005

Briefly, the spotter should stand behind the bench press and use an alternated grip (i.e., one hand using a supinated grip and the other hand using a pronated grip) when lifting the bar out of the racked position on the bench and when helping rerack the barbell.

“Laboratory Manual for Exercise Physiology” by Greg Haff, Charles Dumke
from Laboratory Manual for Exercise Physiology
by Greg Haff, Charles Dumke
Human Kinetics, 2012

Start out by holding the bar using an overhand shoulder-width grip.

“52-week Basketball Training” by Chip Sigmon
from 52-week Basketball Training
by Chip Sigmon
Human Kinetics, 2003

In addition, exercises that tax the core, such as the snatch grip Romanian deadlift, are performed near the end of the session because these types of exercises create a lot of fatigue in the lower back (95).

“Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes: Science and Application” by Rhodri S. Lloyd, Jon L. Oliver
from Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes: Science and Application
by Rhodri S. Lloyd, Jon L. Oliver
Taylor & Francis, 2019

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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7 comments

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  • Performed these for the first time today and it was amazing deadlift variation; however, my nut sack was getting squashed each rep….still worth it imo.

  • “get stronger in crappy position so when you go back to deadlifting with a correct position, you feel much more efficient” sounds like train bad form so you can appreciate good form. lol…fun video though

  • Yo Alan, can you do a video on exertion headaches when lifting? Suffering from one at the moment and keen to hear your thoughts on how to treat and prevent further occurrences.

  • subscribed bro, I weigh 82 kg (181 lbs) and deadlift 200 kg(441 lbs) and have hit a wall, what can I do? I’ve been stuck on it for months

  • Maybe I’m doing it wrong, but I like to load my hamstrings even more and start with my butt higher, as opposed to squatting down a little. It makes it even tougher, although I try to be more careful with keeping the weight more manageable for the lower back.

  • Алексей, спасибо за уроки! Очень многому научилась благодаря вашим видео. У меня возникла проблема. После занятий со штангой, именной рывок и взятие немеют указательный и большой пальцы. Испытываю небольшое покалывание и дискомфорт. В чем эта проблема? Могли бы вы ответить?

  • Does anyone know an estimate on snatch deadlift carryover to conventional deadlift? I’ve heard ratios anywhere between 80%-90% of conventional, would factors come into play as well like stronger upper back advantageous in a snatch?