Control over Common Running Injury

 

Common Running Injuries and Treatment

Video taken from the channel: TheRunningTV


 

Common Running Injuries

Video taken from the channel: UW Video


 

The Top 15 Running Injuries

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Managing Marathon Running Injuries

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

11 ways to outwit the most common running injuries

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Common Running Injuries: Prevention & Treatment

Video taken from the channel: New England Baptist Hospital


 

What Every Runner Needs To Know: Coping With and Preventing Running Injuries

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


Running is a common form of exercise but predisposes athletes to several running-related injuries. Most running injuries are due to overuse and respond to conservative treatment. Tendinopathies in.

accurate diagnosis. Having a good understanding of these injuries as well of the role of biomechanical factors and common training errors can assist with appropriate care. Further development in the knowledge of soft tissue trauma, gait, and diagnostic and therapeutic modalities should lead to improved. Rapid diagnosis and conservative management of common running injuries and referral of patients with injuries that have a propensity for morbidity, such as femoral neck stress fractures, are reviewed.

Careful evaluation of the patient’s running program and physical therapy are important components of management. Running is a common form of exercise but predisposes athletes to several running-related injuries. Most running injuries are due to overuse and respond to conservative treatment. Tendinopathies in the patellar, Achilles, and hamstring tendons are common, and are primarily treated with eccentric exercise. running-related injuries.

Most running injuries are due to overuse and respond to conservative treatment. Tendinopathies in the patellar, Achilles, and hamstring tendons are common, and are primarily treated with eccentric exercise. Iliotibial band syndrome and patellofemoral pain syndrome are less common than patellar.

According to some studies, nearly 80% of injuries are caused due to repetitive stress, and some of the causes behind sudden injuries are torn muscles or sprained ankle as well. And, now it’s time to know some of the most common running injuries that happen during running. Most Common Types of Running Injuries. 1.

Injuries are painful, debilitating, and have the potential to set you back weeks or months from your workout goals. A few injuries make up most of the exercise mishaps out there, and though nobody. Hip stress fractures are very common among athletes who participate in” high impact” running activities such as long distance running. Ankle Sprain which often is a result of running over pot holes on the road.

It is caused by stretching and/or tearing of ligaments, the most common being where damage to the ligaments on the outside of the. One common injury, called iliotibial band syndrome, is often caused by overtraining. This condition occurs when the iliotibial band gets irritated, creating pain and discomfort in the outside knee area.

Plantar fasciitis, another common running injury, also occurs as a. Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common foot injuries. It involves irritation or degeneration of the thick layer of tissue, called fascia, on the.

List of related literature:

The most common area of injury is the knee; other areas of injury from running include the shin, Achilles tendon, calf, heel, foot, hamstring, and quadriceps (1).

“Sex Differences in Sports Medicine” by Ellen Casey, MD, Monica Rho, MD, Joel Press, MD
from Sex Differences in Sports Medicine
by Ellen Casey, MD, Monica Rho, MD, Joel Press, MD
Springer Publishing Company, 2016

To effectively treat the runner with an overuse injury of the lower extremity and foot, the clinician must understand normal running mechanics so that he or she can determine the causes of repetitive trauma and inflammation secondary to tissue stress.

“Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book” by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, William S. Quillen, Robert C. Manske
from Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book
by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

See Table 83.4 for an overview of running injuries and corresponding treatment strategies.

“Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: A Team Approach E-Book” by Charles E Giangarra, Robert C. Manske
from Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation: A Team Approach E-Book
by Charles E Giangarra, Robert C. Manske
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

For instance, runners are at high risk of suffering stress fractures in the weight­bearing bones, such as the metatarsals, tibia, and femur.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Common running injuries: evaluation and management.

“Rheumatology Secrets E-Book” by Sterling West, Jason Kolfenbach
from Rheumatology Secrets E-Book
by Sterling West, Jason Kolfenbach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The most common running injuries are patellofemoral stress syndrome, iliotibial band friction, medial tibial stress syndrome, plantar fasciitis, Achilles paratenonitis and patellar tendon injury.

“Sports Science Handbook: I-Z” by Simon P. R. Jenkins
from Sports Science Handbook: I-Z
by Simon P. R. Jenkins
Multi-Science, 2005

Based upon the main types of injuries that endurance runners suffer, the following areas should be targeted: trunk, foot and ankle, hamstrings and glutes.

“Strength and Conditioning for Endurance Running” by Richard Blagrove
from Strength and Conditioning for Endurance Running
by Richard Blagrove
Crowood, 2015

Most of the injuries are caused by overuse during running activities (33%).7 Clement and colleagues theorized that the injuries are caused by microtrauma produced by fatigued muscles, eccentric loading, or excess tendon loading.8

“Baxter's The Foot and Ankle in Sport” by David A. Porter, Lew C. Schon
from Baxter’s The Foot and Ankle in Sport
by David A. Porter, Lew C. Schon
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The typical running-based injuries of hamstring, groin, and calf strains are coupled with the contact injuries of knee ACL, shoulder and ankle sprains, and concussion (Table 9.1).

“Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance” by Anthony Turner
from Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance
by Anthony Turner
Taylor & Francis, 2018

These athletes incur many of the same emergent injuries that other athletes suffer from, such as overuse musculoskeletal injuries, extremity fractures, traumatic brain injury, heat illness, and cardiac disease.

“Adaptive Sports Medicine: A Clinical Guide” by Arthur Jason De Luigi
from Adaptive Sports Medicine: A Clinical Guide
by Arthur Jason De Luigi
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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14 comments

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  • #1 is bs but good for selling shoes and there are clues that quite the opposite of #4 is true. Softer surfaces may actually put more stress on muscles and joints than harder surfaces do.

  • I had tendinitis around my knee a year ago and recovered, but right before track season this year, I fractured my leg. I definitely brought it upon myself though. I was running constantly every day for 5 months straight and I took a 2 week break and when I got back to running, I immediately started doing hard workouts and everything just fell apart.
    2 weeks of nothing to 5 1k repeats at 3:25 pace.. not the greatest idea

  • When I run, literally as soon as I start, my ankles start to seize up, they get very painful, then the pain radiates up my shins. My ankles basically go numb and I end up stomping. It hurts SO incredibly much! I’m 18, and not sporty, but slim. I thought it was shin splints, but apparently only athletic people get that!:) Any ideas of what is wrong with meeeee? 

  • If you’re getting calf pain when running, try these videos to figure out how to address your issues https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BJ0ZYUYIqU&list=PLKcBI9vYDGiSXxHxg7LIwTa9fXLmkEd5S

  • These are good tips! I have also been using a hemp symmetry CBD infused knee compression sleeve that has worked wonders for my knee pain!

  • Running on ‘soft’ surfaces would increase the stiffness within the limb. This may increase the risk of injury to bony components in the limbs?

  • can someone explain to me how tip 2 is dont add speed or distance abruptly and then tip 3 being try doing intervals like what? thats just adding speed abruptly!??!

  • Why give the suggestion to ice everything? You do realize icing only prolongs most injuries right? It takes down the swelling so now the body has no defense mechanism to protect the actual injury.

  • If you is interested in cures for plantar foot the greatest info that I have ever had was by using the Natural Foot Wizard (just google it) definately the most incredible resource that I’ve followed.

  • So I just recently started sprinting and I’m finding recovery to be very tricky. The area around my knees is constantly very weak and unstable and I developed some knee pain in my left knee because of that. I have trouble walking now just because of the weakness and instability in my knees. It’s bad. I’ve also become a lot slower of course. I’m trying to do less and less with my legs but not much seems to be changing. There’s a leg workout I’ve been doing 3 times a week that I’m now going to do only 2 times a week and I’m hoping that’s going to finally allow my legs to recover like they should be. Other than that I’ve never had any major injuries. If I could just recover properly that would change things big time. I’d probably drop 5 seconds off my 100 meter time. I just need that recovery.

  • So much more that can be done about running injuries its not just rest, ice and orthotics.
    How about getting to the root cause of the problem? These measures suggested are treating the symptoms, not the cause.
    Teach yourself how to mobilise your foot, learn how to move your body with Feldenkrais, and watch a few videos about technique so you can play with the elements whilst you run. Seek out expert advice on which conditioning drills are most appropriate for you. There are no recipes, we are all different shapes and sizes and require different combinations of muscles/fascia released and realigned.

  • I bet someone patted themselves on this back for this unhelpful video.

    I have learned real treatments like the absolute best cure for blisters is soaking your feet in a bucket with a couple of quarts of Castor Oil. Its messy and expensive and requires many paper towels to clean up, but renews your feet.

    Soaking your feet in a bucket of ice filled water for as long as you can stand it is a miracle cure for Achilles heel injuries.Don’t be cheap on running shoes. I buy 3 pairs of Brooks Glycerin shoes at a time every 6 months.  I have tried many shoes and these are the first I ever bought multiple pairs at a time of.Don’t be cheap on socks. I was hesitant at first to pay $15 for a pair of socks when 3 packs are $9 for a cheaper socks. Now I can’t walk around the house with the cheap ones you get so spoiled.I am 50 and have run 618 days in a row, and now I run 50 75 miles per week with a minimum of 7 miles per day.  I have never run a full marathon because they cost so much. I was thinking of running one this year but I would rather just go run and save $150+ dollars. This video seems like it was written by someone hoping to inspire others to reach moderate levels of success.

  • Great video. I’m new to running and have been experiencing ankle pain. I was running with 3-year-old shoes… I wonder if that’s why? Lol

  • great video! I recently started running and have come down with a knee injury, so have been left focusing on upper body exercises only. Hopefully it’ll heal again soon and i’ll be able to start my running sessions again!