Why fat loss-Loss Plateau Can be a Good Sign

 

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The reasons why you’ve hit a weight loss plateau

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Most people dread a weight-loss plateau, but when the scale won’t budge, you may actually want to celebrate. “It may be your new equilibrium,” says Tim Church, MD, MPH, professor of preventive medicine at Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State University. Your body may be saying this is the weight it wants to naturally maintain, so stick to. What causes a weight-loss plateau?

During the first few weeks of losing weight, a rapid drop is normal. In part, this is because when you cut calories, the body gets needed energy initially by releasing its stores of glycogen, a type of carbohydrate found in the muscles and liver. A person may experience a weight loss plateau because their metabolism has slowed down. When a person reaches a weight loss plateau, they will no longer lose any weight, despite following a diet. Why a weight loss plateau may be a good sign One of the most frustrating parts of a weight loss journey is the dreaded plateau.

Most people start out with a pretty good rhythm of losing 1-2 pounds per week when starting a new nutrition plan. Any time you are switching up your game like that, your metabolism will respond in kind. Plateaus are also typically a sign you are getting closer to your goal weight. Typically you’ll lose a lot of weight up front, but the closer you get to your goal weight, the slower things go.

The other good news is after you hit a plateau, they can be worked through. The solution to fixing it and losing weight again can be unique for everyone. Here’s why: A weight loss plateau is a normal and healthy part of the weight loss process and it simply means that your body is recognizing that it’s a new smaller person—and it’s settling in and adjusting to being slimmer.

Other factors that can influence weight loss include thyroid or adrenal gland problems, medications you’re taking, pregnancy, breastfeeding, menopause, and quitting smoking. But more than likel. It’s a sign that you’re completely normal and have hit a point that everyone hits on their weight-loss journey.

A plateau is a mark on the road, letting you know you’re heading in the right. “If you are successfully losing weight, you’ll most likely hit a plateau at some point,” Amanda Foti, M.S., R.D., a senior dietitian at Selvera Weight Management Program, tells. In fact, a plateau is a good sign — it indicates you’ve made progress. WHY DO PLATEAUS HAPPEN?

Many people experience a more-rapid-than-normal drop on the scale the first several weeks of a drastic diet change or calorie deficit.

List of related literature:

Because most people interpret a plateau as a sign of failure, that their weight loss is slowing down, and that from this point on there will only be more effort and no reward.

“Full-Filled: The 6-Week Weight-Loss Plan for Changing Your Relationship with Food-and Your Life-from the Inside Out” by Renée Stephens, Samantha Rose
from Full-Filled: The 6-Week Weight-Loss Plan for Changing Your Relationship with Food-and Your Life-from the Inside Out
by Renée Stephens, Samantha Rose
Atria Books, 2011

During the plateau phase the LCD is still working, even though weight loss is not occurring because the intracellular metabolic changes that must first occur before weight loss can recommence are taking place during the plateau phase; be patient and weight loss will resume with increased vigor.

“The Liver Cleansing Diet” by Sandra Cabot MD
from The Liver Cleansing Diet
by Sandra Cabot MD
SCB International, 2014

In another study, Chaput et al. (2007c) investigated the impact of weight loss until weight loss plateau (no further weight loss during a 1-month period) on changes in hunger, restrained eating, and depression.

“Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition” by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
from Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition
by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
Springer New York, 2011

Moreover, it assumes that weight loss will continue without reaching a plateau.

“Handbook of Obesity Treatment, Second Edition” by Thomas A. Wadden, George A. Bray
from Handbook of Obesity Treatment, Second Edition
by Thomas A. Wadden, George A. Bray
Guilford Publications, 2019

This is the dreaded weight-loss plateau.

“Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity” by Ivor Cummins, Jeffry Gerber
from Eat Rich, Live Long: Mastering the Low-Carb & Keto Spectrum for Weight Loss and Longevity
by Ivor Cummins, Jeffry Gerber
Victory Belt Publishing, 2018

A weight regain of up to 20 lb from the weight loss nadir to a long-term plateau is common.

“Family Practice Guidelines: Second Edition” by Jill C. Cash, MSN, APN, FNP-BC, Cheryl A. Glass, MSN, WHNP, RN-BC
from Family Practice Guidelines: Second Edition
by Jill C. Cash, MSN, APN, FNP-BC, Cheryl A. Glass, MSN, WHNP, RN-BC
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

The number on the scale can fluctuate for many reasons, so one or two slow weeks don’t indicate a true plateau.

“Belly Fat Diet For Dummies” by Erin Palinski-Wade
from Belly Fat Diet For Dummies
by Erin Palinski-Wade
Wiley, 2012

The pace of weight loss is always erratic, but the definition of a plateau is when you lose nothing—nada—despite doing everything right, over a period of at least four weeks.

“The New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great” by Dr. Eric C. Westman, Dr. Stephen D. Phinney, Dr. Jeff S. Volek
from The New Atkins for a New You: The Ultimate Diet for Shedding Weight and Feeling Great
by Dr. Eric C. Westman, Dr. Stephen D. Phinney, Dr. Jeff S. Volek
Atria Books, 2010

Poor Circulation And Low Energy: For some dieters, initial weight loss is rapid, but then a plateau is reached and further weight loss becomes difficult because restricted food intake slows down metabolism, reduces energy and can affect circulation.

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone” by Linda G. Rector-Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone
by Linda G. Rector-Page
Traditional Wisdom, 2000

Therefore, weight loss will plateau without an even greater decrease in Kcals.

“Women and Health” by Marlene B. Goldman, Rebecca Troisi, Kathryn M. Rexrode
from Women and Health
by Marlene B. Goldman, Rebecca Troisi, Kathryn M. Rexrode
Elsevier Science, 2012

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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2 comments

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  • This was helpful but can this occur if you’ve only lost 11 pounds. I used to weigh 135 pounds in the beginning of June. I started to drink a gallon of water every day, exercise and eat healthy. I lost 8 pounds in the month of June. This month ( July ) i have already lost 3 pounds. I now weigh 124 pounds. My goal weight is to be 115 pounds. So is there a chance that I could hit a weight plateau now? Do I need to eat a little less?

  • Thank you so much! This video was amazing and I love both the psychological and physiological aspect! I absolutely have been sabotaging myself especially these past two months! You are absolutely correct, I love the aspect of changing “rewards” from food to other aspects! Thank you, this video is amazing!!