Why Consuming More May be the Secret to lose weight

 

Why Women Need to EAT MORE to Lose Weight

Video taken from the channel: MissRoyallyFit


 

Portion Control & Healthy Weight Loss

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Permanently Lose Weight by Eating More Fiber?

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


You should consider eating more complex carbs and high-fiber foods, says Butler. Compared to simple carbohydrates and highly refined and processed foods, complex carbohydrates and fibrous foods take longer to digest so your body uses more energy (or calories) to break them down. “If your healthy eating plan emphasizes eating more nutrient-dense foods like fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean proteins and healthy fats, you’ll be better able to stick to it, since you won’t feel hungry all the time, and you won’t feel restricted during mealtime,” says Chicago-based registered dietitian Amanda Kostro Miller.

“If your healthy eating plan emphasizes eating more nutrient-dense foods like fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean proteins and healthy fats, you’ll be better able to stick to it, since you won’t feel hungry all the time, and you won’t feel restricted during mealtime,” says. Absent a medical condition that is causing weight gain or obstructing weight loss, the “secret” to losing weight is to live a lifestyle that has you ingest fewer calories than you burn. Losing weight should be about progress, not suffering.

It should be about realizing that you’re ready to start living a healthier life, and you should feel happy and radiant while doing it. If you’re looking to lose weight (and keep it off permanently), eat more, not less. Here are some tips to.

It can seem terrifying to eat more, but rest assured, not only will your metabolism get the kick it needs to jumpstart your weight loss again, your body could also end up shedding more fat and hanging onto precious muscle, which in the long run will help keep you strong and help encourage the weight to stay away. Cocoa contains more antioxidants than most foods and is good for so many things, including when consumed in moderation weight loss. In a June 2011 study from the Journal of Nutrition, researchers looked at the effect that antioxidants found in cocoa had on obese diabetic mice.

Think of food as your body’s kindling; it sparks your metabolism, making weight loss possible. When you’re eating enough, the body first uses food for fuel, then turns to the fat it’s been holding. You might be thinking, Yeah, eating more can help bring about weight loss, money grows on trees, and making out with a frog is the best way to.

Later in life, weight loss—not weight gain—is associated with a greater risk of death. “As we age, the stomach empties more slowly, which makes you feel fuller longer,” she says.

List of related literature:

Indeed, many of these “alternative” methods are really just other ways of making it easier for one to eat less.

“Handbook of Self-Regulation, Second Edition: Research, Theory, and Applications” by Kathleen D. Vohs, Roy F. Baumeister
from Handbook of Self-Regulation, Second Edition: Research, Theory, and Applications
by Kathleen D. Vohs, Roy F. Baumeister
Guilford Publications, 2011

Research confirms that the body adjusts its metabolism whenever it gains or loses weight—in the direction that returns to the initial body weight: energy expenditure increases with weight gain and decreases with weight loss.

“Nutrition for Health and Health Care” by Ellie Whitney, Linda Kelly DeBruyne, Kathryn Pinna, Sharon Rady Rolfes
from Nutrition for Health and Health Care
by Ellie Whitney, Linda Kelly DeBruyne, et. al.
Cengage Learning, 2010

These facts are motivating more and more people to change their diets.

“Power Foods for the Brain: An Effective 3-Step Plan to Protect Your Mind and Strengthen Your Memory” by Neal D Barnard
from Power Foods for the Brain: An Effective 3-Step Plan to Protect Your Mind and Strengthen Your Memory
by Neal D Barnard
Grand Central Publishing, 2013

In contrast, the only way that many people are able to lose weight on the conventional LFHC diet is because they have the discipline to ignore the sensations of hunger and to eat fewer calories than their brains and bodies desire.

“Lore of Nutrition: Challenging conventional dietary beliefs” by Tim Noakes
from Lore of Nutrition: Challenging conventional dietary beliefs
by Tim Noakes
Penguin Random House South Africa, 2017

Other studies had already shown that the body’s metabolism slows down as people lose weight, which means they have to eat fewer and fewer calories to keep losing.

“The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America” by Tommy Tomlinson
from The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man’s Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America
by Tommy Tomlinson
Simon & Schuster, 2020

This is also compounded by the societal myth that people should be able to lose their weight through dieting if only they had enough willpower.

“Living with Bariatric Surgery: Managing your mind and your weight” by Denise Ratcliffe
from Living with Bariatric Surgery: Managing your mind and your weight
by Denise Ratcliffe
Taylor & Francis, 2018

It’s logical to think that consuming less food than usual will produce weight loss because overeating is generally identified as the reason for weight gain.

“Health and Wellness” by Gordon Edlin, Eric Golanty
from Health and Wellness
by Gordon Edlin, Eric Golanty
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

That’s especially true if you have weight loss resistance, a condition other diets often ignore or can’t address.

“The Virgin Diet Cookbook: 150 Easy and Delicious Recipes to Lose Weight and Feel Better Fast” by J.J. Virgin
from The Virgin Diet Cookbook: 150 Easy and Delicious Recipes to Lose Weight and Feel Better Fast
by J.J. Virgin
Grand Central Publishing, 2014

Research has shown that this triggers stronger cravings and increases the likelihood of overeating later in the day.

“Choose to Lose: The 7-Day Carb Cycle Solution” by Chris Powell
from Choose to Lose: The 7-Day Carb Cycle Solution
by Chris Powell
Hachette Books, 2011

Furthermore, hormones such as leptin and ghrelin are affected by dietary intake and adiposity and appear to play a role in reward; thus, it is possible that dietary patterns associated with food addiction, obesity, and BED precede and cause altered reward processing.

“Compulsive Eating Behavior and Food Addiction: Emerging Pathological Constructs” by Pietro Cottone, Catherine F Moore, Valentina Sabino, George F. Koob
from Compulsive Eating Behavior and Food Addiction: Emerging Pathological Constructs
by Pietro Cottone, Catherine F Moore, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2019

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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2 comments

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  • Uh, yes! I’ve tried getting as much fiber as is possible, yet I’m still 40 + overweight. Simply put, what is the deal? Maybe I should just exercise more. I hate most exercise routines, except Dai Ji. & maybe yoga.

  • This was the trick for me! It did work. I was always so hungry and working out hard. But saw a plateau in weight and lower endurance. I wasn’t consuming enough quality calories. My body was hanging on for dear life to my fat. This made all the difference. I feel 100 percent now. Leaner and stronger.