Walking Speed Beats Step-Count, Based on Science

 

WALKING AT HOMEINDOOR WALKING 7 Minute Fat Burning Pace to Lose Weight Lucy Wyndham-Read

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Why It’s Almost Impossible to Run 100 Meters In 9 Seconds | WIRED

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Thoughts on daily step count and a suggested walking pace

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Get 2000 STEPS | #STEPtember Challenge ��HIGH SWEAT + LOW IMPACT �� Fat Burning Walking Workout��

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2000 STEPS | SOUL SESSIONS WALKING WORKOUT | BEGINNER FRIENDLY + CALORIE BLASTING

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Walking Speed Beats Step-Count, According to Science. by Jodi Helmer. December 14, 2019. No Comments. When it comes to improved health, your walking speed might be more important than the total duration of your workout. New research shows following an interval walking program that fluctuates between fast and slow speeds for up to 50 minutes per week is more beneficial for physical fitness than walking.

Higher speeds could help burn more energy, stressing the body and triggering the need to sleep as part of the recovery process. Another study of dog owners found those who walked up to 9,961 steps per day (or roughly 4.16 miles) slept an average of 53 minutes longer than those who walked just 5,247 steps. Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength.

As you increase your speed, you also tend to increase your stride length. According to Science Trends, runners can cover a mile in 1,400 steps or less. The faster you go, the longer your stride tends to be as you’re bouncing from one foot to the next. Walking is defined as a movement where one foot is on the ground at all times. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, and a study published in The Lancet concluded a person that exercises five times per week paid $2,500 less in annual health care expenses related to heart disease than someone who did not walk or otherwise move for 30 minutes per day five times per week!

The incidence of walking independence in the low-score group was 21 of 61 (34.4%) patients with impaired cognitive function. According to the logistic regression analysis, the main factor associated with walking independence in the low-score group was the 10-m walking speed (odds ratio, 1.113; 95% confidence interval, 1.045–1.186) (Table 2).With regard to the compatibility of the. Walking speed is a critical indicator of your health. Your walking speed is a more accurate predictor of your life expectancy than just age or gender. Walking speed also predicts a complex battery of other health indicators including cognitive function, mental and physical well-being.

More than any other vital sign, walking speed can predict. The average walking speed of an adult is 3 to 4 miles per hour, but that all depends on age, fitness level, terrain, and other factors. Starting a walking routine can be beneficial for your health. If you walk a mile in 15 minutes, divide 60 by 15 to get a walking speed of 4 mph.

Alternately, divide the number of minutes you walked 1/2 mile by 30. Tips. Choose a pace you feel you can maintain for 30 minutes or more without stopping. Walking is one of the most rewarding lifelong activities you can choose.

While it may not be a huge calorie burner — the average person burns about 100 calories or so per mile — adding more mileage to your day can make a big difference in weight control.According to Harvard Health Watch, one study found the average person gains about 2.2 pounds a year during middle age.

List of related literature:

Crutch users required 80 percent more energy than controls when walking very slowly, but used only 8 percent more energy than controls at the fastest speed, perhaps because of greater ease in maintaining body balance and walking rhythm.

“Bulletin of Prosthetics Research” by United States. Veterans Administration. Department of Medicine and Surgery, United States. Veterans Administration. Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service. Research and Development Division, Research Center for Prosthetics (U.S.), United States. Veterans Administration. Rehabilitative Engineering Research and Development Service
from Bulletin of Prosthetics Research
by United States. Veterans Administration. Department of Medicine and Surgery, United States. Veterans Administration. Prosthetic and Sensory Aids Service. Research and Development Division, et. al.
Department of Medicine and Surgery, Veterans Administration, 1981

Walking speed was measured before and after training; those subjects with initial slower speed increased their speed in 85 percent of cases, whereas those with initial fast speed showed an increase in only 9 percent of cases [Ditunno and Scivoletto, 2009].

“Swaiman's Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, Donna M Ferriero, Nina F Schor
from Swaiman’s Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Results from this study confirmed that walking speed was the best single measure of walking impairment.

“Motor Control: Translating Research Into Clinical Practice” by Anne Shumway-Cook, Marjorie H. Woollacott
from Motor Control: Translating Research Into Clinical Practice
by Anne Shumway-Cook, Marjorie H. Woollacott
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

A classic, comprehensive, treadmill-grade walking study was carried out by Margaria (1938), who found that going down a slope of 1 in 10 at varying speeds involved an energy expenditure of up to 25% less than walking on level ground.

“Textbook of Work Physiology: Physiological Bases of Exercise” by Per-Olof Åstrand, Kaare Rodahl, Hans A. Dahl, Sigmund B. Strømme
from Textbook of Work Physiology: Physiological Bases of Exercise
by Per-Olof Åstrand, Kaare Rodahl, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2003

Many consumer-grade pedometers significantly undercount steps at walking speeds slower than 0.9 meters per second (about 2 miles per hour), which is particularly problematic for healthy older adults who walk at these speeds (Martin et al., 2012).

“Technology for Physical Educators, Health Educators, and Coaches: Enhancing Instruction, Assessment, Management, Professional Development, and Advocacy” by Seth E. Jenny, Jennifer M. Krause, Tess Armstrong
from Technology for Physical Educators, Health Educators, and Coaches: Enhancing Instruction, Assessment, Management, Professional Development, and Advocacy
by Seth E. Jenny, Jennifer M. Krause, Tess Armstrong
Human Kinetics, 2020

However, achieving the break point of faster than 0.8 m/s (1.8 mph) in walking speed only represents 60% of what is normal for most healthy adults (6).

“Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation” by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, Joel Stein, MD, Carolee J. Winstein, PhD, PT, FAPTA, Richard D. Zorowitz, MD
from Stroke Recovery and Rehabilitation
by Richard L. Harvey, MD, Richard F. Macko, MD, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

On the other hand, researchers have associated some of these changes with differences in walking speed.

“Life Span Motor Development” by Kathleen Haywood, Kathleen M. Haywood, Nancy Getchell
from Life Span Motor Development
by Kathleen Haywood, Kathleen M. Haywood, Nancy Getchell
Human Kinetics, 2019

The general pattern from this study again shows a scatter in walking speeds, but the average speeds are rather faster than those from the other two studies.

“SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering” by Morgan J. Hurley, Daniel T. Gottuk, John R. Hall Jr., Kazunori Harada, Erica D. Kuligowski, Milosh Puchovsky, Jose ́ L. Torero, John M. Watts Jr., CHRISTOPHER J. WIECZOREK
from SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering
by Morgan J. Hurley, Daniel T. Gottuk, et. al.
Springer New York, 2015

Walking speed was measured at a time when participants believed they were not involved in an experimental task: walking to the next part of the experiment.

“Ageism: Stereotyping and Prejudice Against Older Persons” by Todd D. Nelson
from Ageism: Stereotyping and Prejudice Against Older Persons
by Todd D. Nelson
MIT Press, 2004

Thus, at any walking speed, individuals with an amputation use metabolic energy at a higher rate and will reach AT at a slower walking speed.

“Physical Rehabilitation” by Susan B O'Sullivan, Thomas J Schmitz, George Fulk
from Physical Rehabilitation
by Susan B O’Sullivan, Thomas J Schmitz, George Fulk
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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19 comments

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  • Love your workouts! Thank you! Please could you make your timer larger? I have bad eyesight but really like to see how much time is left, especially if I don’t have sound on.

  • Absolutely love your workouts. I have all your DVDs, including the new ones, and have to say they are awesome. So fun, absolutely no dread factor!

  • Love Gina! Such a great quick workout to get your heart pumping, blood flowing, and mental and spiritual rejuvenation! Fit and fun!!!

  • Ever since my hip arthritis diagnosis (so that’s why it hurt!) this has become my go-to workout. Great to get my steps in without increasing my pain! Any chance I can talk you into choreographing some Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff or Slightly Stoopid?

  • This is one of my favorite videos! The music is so great and the moves are perfect for a nice quick workout after a long day at work! Even when I can’t bring myself to do anything else I can convince myself to put this one on and groove it out.

  • I just can’t get over this workout. I’ve been doing this every single day. Thank you so much for this beautiful workout! Love from India! ❤️❤️

  • Gina!!! I love your workouts this is from someone who doesn’t enjoy to workout but you’ve helped changed that! ❤I love the studio background it’s so aesthetically pleasing makes me feel like I’m in a real class without even having to leave my house ��Can you please do a workout to the Best of the 80’s hits? ������

  • I love your video my husband notice a big difference I would recommend your videos to anybody.
    Thank you so much this help alot I love it ❤❤❤❤������

  • I hurt my leg stretching and this was so perfect for me right now! It was my first workout in over a week and I feel great, thank you! ❤️

  • Hi I found your site about a week ago. What a great time I’m having doing all your work outs. It’s so noce to find some thing that is not too high impack on my older knees ]. Thank you keep them coming please. From cloudy North Wales UK

  • You are awesome Gina! I am an old soul too! So glad you are too! This makes it a
    lot easier to keep up with, especially when there is health issues. So grateful to you!

  • I do all my moves from a chair because I can’t stand right now and this felt amazing. Especially, when it feels like you really speaking words of positivity into US! Thank you so much! All the best from New York City!

  • You should try to do research on Samsung health app If you haven’t. I think It’ll make a huge difference compared to the iPhone. I’ve had both android & iOS phones.

  • Thank you, I had soooo much fun.. I am overweight but working on it and your workouts are sooo good for me. I don’t enjoy walking outdoors… I live in a river town and the hills are steep and I am not down for that..not yet anyway:) LOL

  • Thank you very much! I am so enjoying your creative and themed exercises and your happy self. Rays of sunshine on my soul. God bless you with strength and more creativity.
    Stay safe:>))

  • This was so fun! FTR I logged 1600 steps and 0.8 miles. The music was great, I was looking for something different than typical gym-type house music. Love your personality. Don’t stop singing!

  • Loved this! I woke up and just wasn’t feeling like I wanted to do the workout I planned, was feeling a bit low, but I wanted to do something this was perfect, happy, great music. Feeling much more positive now. Thanks x

  • Its not almost impossible cause the title of the video is wrong. They even explain it in the same, so you actually can run 100 meters in 9 seconds, as long as you have an initial acceleration. The title should be “Why It’s Almost Impossible to Run 100-Meter DASH In 9 Seconds” or “”Why It’s Almost Impossible to Run THE 100 Meters In 9 Seconds” When THE 100 METERS make reference to the 100 Meters Dash.

  • Ready for a super soul session Sunday! I was going to do your new workout but I feel awful. I still want to move and I love the music and choreography for this— just what I need!:)