Yams Latkes

 

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Sweet Potato Latkes | Cooking Tutorial

Video taken from the channel: Southern Living


Ingredients 1 large sweet potato, peeled and grated ½ onion, grated 2 large eggs eggs ¼ teaspoon black pepper 2 teaspoons olive oil, or more if needed ½. Ingredients 1 lb sweet potatoes, peeled and coarsely grated 2 scallions, finely chopped 1/3 cup all-purpose flour 2 large eggs, lightly beaten 1 teaspoon salt 1/2. Step 1 Place sweet potatoes in a colander. Place a cheesecloth over the potatoes, and squeeze the potatoes to release as much liquid as possible. Let the potatoes.

For a festive addition to any holiday table, try these crispy sweet potato latkes teamed with apple-raisin chutney and jalapeno lime sour cream. Lightly fried (or. In a large bowl, combine scallions and eggs.

Add flour, salt, ginger, cardamom, and pepper, and stir until incorporated. Add both kinds of potatoes, and. Steps 1 Mix all ingredients except sour cream and pecans. 2 Oven Directions: Heat oven to 400°F. Generously grease cookie sheet.

Drop sweet potato mixture by teaspoonfuls onto 3 Skillet Directions: In a 12-inch skillet, heat 1/4 cup vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Drop sweet potato. These latkes are lightly pan fried in a small amount of olive oil, made with sweet potatoes instead of white and made EASY by using a spiralizer because it eliminates the need to grate the potatoes, which can take a lot of time.

With the spiralizer, it only takes minutes. Makes 16 latkes. 1 large sweet potato, peeled and grated — about 4 cups (1 litre) grated.

1/2 large yellow or sweet onion, grated — about 3/4 cup (180 mL) grated. 1 egg. 1/2 tsp (2.5 mL.

Sweet Potato Latkes This recipe is easily made in a waffle iron, but you could also cook these in a nonstick skillet or on an electric griddle. These latkes are easily made gluten free by swapping the all purpose flour for a gluten-free flour blend. Metric 450g 2 each Sweet Potatoes, grated Eggs, large 1. Gather all ingredients and equipment. Baked sweet potato latkes have beautiful crispy edges and are soft inside. They are irresistible served hot with a big dollop of sour cream and some green onions.

This baked version is much healthier than traditional deep-fried latkes yet it’s every bit as delicious.

List of related literature:

Ideally, latkes should be somewhat thick, golden, very crisp on the outside, and very creamy in the center.

“Cook's Illustrated Cookbook: 2,000 Recipes from 20 Years of America?s Most Trusted Food Magazine” by Cook's Illustrated
from Cook’s Illustrated Cookbook: 2,000 Recipes from 20 Years of America?s Most Trusted Food Magazine
by Cook’s Illustrated
America’s Test Kitchen, 2011

Drain the latkes on paper towels (pat them with the towels on both sides) and keep them warm in a single layer on a baking sheet in the oven

“How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish” by Ilan Stavans, Josh Lambert
from How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish
by Ilan Stavans, Josh Lambert
Restless Books, 2020

ROASTED SWEET POTATOES WITH SPICED BROWN SUGAR GLAZE Heat ¼ cup packed light brown sugar, 2 tablespoons applejuice, 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon, ¼ teaspoon ground ginger, and ⁄ teaspoon ground nutmeg in small saucepan over medium heat.

“The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen” by Cook's Illustrated
from The Science of Good Cooking: Master 50 Simple Concepts to Enjoy a Lifetime of Success in the Kitchen
by Cook’s Illustrated
America’s Test Kitchen, 2012

For thin, crisp latkes (as opposed to the more customary thick ones), be sure to wring out as much liquid as possible from the grated potatoes, and do not use matzo meal or flour as a filler.

“The Gourmet Cookbook: More Than 1000 Recipes” by Ruth Reichl, John Willoughby, Zanne Early Stewart
from The Gourmet Cookbook: More Than 1000 Recipes
by Ruth Reichl, John Willoughby, Zanne Early Stewart
Houghton Mifflin, 2006

Fry the latkes about 4 to 5 minutes, until they are deep brown on the underside, then flip them, and cook them for 3 to 4 minutes more.

“The Vegetarian Planet: 350 Big-Flavor Recipes for Out-Of-This-World Food Every Day” by Didi Emmons
from The Vegetarian Planet: 350 Big-Flavor Recipes for Out-Of-This-World Food Every Day
by Didi Emmons
Harvard Common Press, 1997

The secret to making crispy potato latkes without absorbing a lot of fat is to fry the batter in enough hot oil or schmaltz (about ¼ inch), enough so that the latkes glide in the pan.

“Encyclopedia of Jewish Food” by Gil Marks
from Encyclopedia of Jewish Food
by Gil Marks
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2010

These latkes are fried in oil to remind Jews of the Hanukkah miracle of the rededication of the Temple, when a tiny bit of oil lasted for eight days.There are many other varieties of latkes, such as carrot, zucchini, and sweet potato.

“Dictionary of Jewish Words: A JPS Guide” by Joyce Eisenberg, Ellen Scolnic
from Dictionary of Jewish Words: A JPS Guide
by Joyce Eisenberg, Ellen Scolnic
Jewish Publication Society, 2010

We wanted our latkes to be somewhat thick, golden, and very crisp on the outside, and very creamy in the center.

“The New Family Cookbook: All-New Edition of the Best-Selling Classic with 1,100 New Recipes” by America's Test Kitchen
from The New Family Cookbook: All-New Edition of the Best-Selling Classic with 1,100 New Recipes
by America’s Test Kitchen
America’s Test Kitchen, 2014

Add the potatoes and sweet potato, sprinkle with salt and pepper, reduce the heat to medium, and cook, undisturbed, until well browned on the first side, about 2 minutes (they’ll stick if you try to turn them too soon).

“Modern Sauces: More than 150 Recipes for Every Cook, Every Day” by Martha Holmberg, Ellen Silverman
from Modern Sauces: More than 150 Recipes for Every Cook, Every Day
by Martha Holmberg, Ellen Silverman
Chronicle Books LLC, 2012

The potato latkes were a big hit with my family, hot out of the frying pan, crisp and golden, with lots of chunky applesauce, sour cream, and kosher sausage.

“The Yada Yada Prayer Group Gets Decked Out” by Neta Jackson
from The Yada Yada Prayer Group Gets Decked Out
by Neta Jackson
Thomas Nelson, 2007

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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16 comments

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  • I make my “screaming hot pink” latkes with beets, yukon gold potatoes, hand sliced leeks, and a little carrot. Flour, baking powder, egg. Really pretty. I use my food processor shredding disc, found out my sister had “invented” using her processor independently, far away, but she still just made traditional russet/onion latkes. They come out more lacy, with crispy bits, when you use a processor. Why work hard grating it manually, and scraping your knuckles? Great minds think alike!

  • late to the video but damn if this isnt a fantastic ad. I watched all of it. Its not intrusive and I know its an ad but it fits into the video so I dont really mind it. Video great as always but damn this ad is what should be displayed for all other ads. so good.

  • We know them as Kartoffelpuffer or Reibeplätzchen here in germany. My granny had even more names for them like Flinsen:) Anyway, greetings from germany!

  • I think “outside the box” would be better than the controversial and historically problematic “off the reservation”, but it was interesting to see how different your topping choices were! Have you considered making Karelian* pasties/pies with egg butter? It’s also a lovely lunch snack!

    *The name “Karelian pie” is protected, so we call them rice pies here nowadays, but it’s the more recognizable translation for when you want to find the intended thing on Google.

  • Babish: Raw potatoes are bad for you? Question mark?
    Me, who would always get an offering of raw potato slice from my mother as a child:

  • My family’s recipe has a lightly boiled potato added to the raw potatoes to make them fluffier. We don’t squeeze them like that, we use a spoon press some of the water out, but not that much. We also add onions or chives to them which is optional but yummy. Sour cream is the traditional topping (or applesauce if you make them on the sweeter side.)

  • We do something very similar in Czech Republic. Its called “cmunda” or “bramborak” (depends on location, also about 102549 variations). Marjoram is always key ingredience, some salami and pig fat instead of oil will make them even better. Try out!

  • You probably haven’t thought about the phrase “off the reservation” since you learned it as a kid, but I suggest taking a moment to really consider what it means, where it comes from, and why it might cause viewers to cringe and/or recoil.

  • 3:30 From right to left, we have the Bagel Latke, the Kosher Nightmare Latke, the Spicy Latke and the Rosh Hashanah Latke. Very interesting takes, I’ll admit.

  • I’ll try not to be offended by the random stuff being put on top of these, like I’ve never seen any Jews even try to put anything on latkes besides sour cream or applesauce, but also I’m really picky and my family usually just makes boxed latkes on some random day of Hannukah once a year so who am I to talk

  • Wow, never knew bramboráky are eaten like this outisde of the Czech Republic! Gotta try it sometime, here we usually add a lot of garlic and bacon into the “dough” and they are made way thinner for more crispiness, they are eaten by themselves or with meat usually.

  • This is similar to a Swedish dish: rårakor, but they aren’t as thick and is fried in butter. You server them with lingonberry jam and fried salted pork ( I don’t know the correct English name for it) or bacon. I sometimes add carrots and red beet to spice it up a bit, give a nice color and taste too.

  • you really should make your own apple sauce to go with the latkes along with some sour cream. because thats better than all the other toppings that you put on it

  • Babish needs a restaurant. I know obviously it won’t be made by babish himself but still. In an ideal world babish has multiple restaurants.

  • Am Jewish Me Approve

    Kinda ;-; The Way My Family Does It Is VERY Different And The More Traditional Way But This is Still A Effective Way Of Doing it
    If Your Ya Know Now jewish

  • If you wanna make it extra tasty, add grated onion (or finely chopped green onion) and/or carrot.

    The right way to eat it is either with sour cream, applesauce, or both.