The J.R.R. Tolkien Help guide to Fitness

 

The Art of The Hobbit – J.R.R. Tolkien Collection

Video taken from the channel: Pontus Presents


 

Tolkien Books Reading Order Building a World

Video taken from the channel: Men of the West


 

JRR Tolkien: Master of the Rings documentary

Video taken from the channel: rkalo


 

We Need to Talk About David Day!

Video taken from the channel: Talking Tolkien


 

Lord of the Rings: How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien

Video taken from the channel: CMUHSS


 

Tolkien 101 | Where to Start & How to Continue

Video taken from the channel: books by leynes


 

Beginner’s Guide for The Lord of the Rings & Tolkien’s Universe For People new to Tolkien’s Lore

Video taken from the channel: ThePhilosophersGames


 

Let’s Talk J.R.R. Tolkien

Video taken from the channel: Books for MKs


 

JRR Tolkien: Master of the Rings documentary

Video taken from the channel: rkalo


 

Tolkien Books Reading Order Building a World

Video taken from the channel: Men of the West


 

Lord of the Rings: How To Read J.R.R. Tolkien

Video taken from the channel: CMUHSS


 

We Need to Talk About David Day!

Video taken from the channel: Talking Tolkien


 

Tolkien 101 | Where to Start & How to Continue

Video taken from the channel: books by leynes


 

Beginner’s Guide for The Lord of the Rings & Tolkien’s Universe For People new to Tolkien’s Lore

Video taken from the channel: ThePhilosophersGames


The J.R.R. Tolkien Guide to Fitness By Steve Kamb • Last Updated: April 28, 2011 • 29 comments Tolkien was the man. Author of some of the the most amazing works in literary fiction history (The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy), this man pretty much pioneered the Fantasy genre that we’ve all.

THE LOST ROAD AND OTHER WRITINGS [J.R.R. TOLKIEN] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. THE LOST ROAD AND OTHER WRITINGS. For readers and students getting to grips with this world for the first time, J.R.R. Tolkien: A Guide for the Perplexed is an essential guide to the author’s life and work.

The book helps readers explore: · Tolkien’s life and times · Tolkien’s mythical world · The languages of Middle Earth · The major works –. For readers and students getting to grips with this world for the first time, J.R.R. Tolkien: A Guide for the Perplexed is an essential guide to the author’s life and work.The book helps readers explore:· Tolkien’s life and times· Tolkien’s mythical world· The languages of Middle Earth· The major works –. Scull and Hammond’s “The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide” is an unparalleled reference work about Tolkien as author.

The “Chronology” volume examines his life in extraordinary detail, often day-by-day. It draws heavily from Tolkien’s letters. A new guide to the life and work of J.R.R.

Tolkien, the premier British fantasy author of the 20th century, and his great works: The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. This guide is clearly written for the general reader, offering an all-round introduction to this hugely popular writer. The book was short, briefed and I thought it was pretty well written and explains many things about Tolkien and what make him click.

I do not believed that Michael White meant his book to be an authoritive biography but as an introduction to J.R.R. Tolkien. J.R.R Tolkien served in World War I before returning to his alma mater, Oxford, where he taught philology and medieval literature. Fascinated by language Tolkien invented his own “Elvish” which led into his own mythology. The Hobbit was first published in in 1937 followed by the trilogy The Lord of the.

J.R.R. Tolkien has been gone for nearly 50 years, yet the words the Lord of the Rings creator left behind feel especially applicable in this weird, uncertain world of the coronavirus outbreak. If.

Health & fitness Family Travel Money The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien review. Children’s books A guide to reading classics for boys.

Published: 15 Apr 2015. A guide to reading.

List of related literature:

He thus fulfills the concept of the “fitness” between words and the things they name, suggested in the passage by Gandalf quoted earlier.

“Ents, Elves, and Eriador: The Environmental Vision of J.R.R. Tolkien” by Matthew T. Dickerson, Jonathan Evans, Donald D. Elder, Tom Shippey
from Ents, Elves, and Eriador: The Environmental Vision of J.R.R. Tolkien
by Matthew T. Dickerson, Jonathan Evans, et. al.
University Press of Kentucky, 2006

Training for health and fitness is discussed at length in part VII of this book.

“Physiology of Sport and Exercise” by W. Larry Kenney, Jack H. Wilmore, David L. Costill
from Physiology of Sport and Exercise
by W. Larry Kenney, Jack H. Wilmore, David L. Costill
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2019

Castiglione’s Book of the Courtier (1528), followed by Thomas Elyot’s Book of the Governour (1541), included chapters on physical education, promoting the classical Greek and Roman physical activities (along with fencing, archery, tennis, and dancing) as good exercises.

“Physical Education, Exercise and Sport Science in a Changing Society” by William Freeman
from Physical Education, Exercise and Sport Science in a Changing Society
by William Freeman
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2011

Among these are chapter 7: “Weight Training and Body Shaping”; chapter 8: “Body-Fat Loss and Weight Control”; chapter 9: “Body Image”; and chapter 16: “Beyond Fitness: Becoming an Elite Performer,” for readers who wish to go beyond mere physical fitness.

“Physical Fitness and Wellness: Changing the Way You Look, Feel, and Perform” by Jerrold S. Greenberg, George B. Dintiman, Barbee Myers Oakes
from Physical Fitness and Wellness: Changing the Way You Look, Feel, and Perform
by Jerrold S. Greenberg, George B. Dintiman, Barbee Myers Oakes
Human Kinetics, 2004

Andreas, S. Cross Training and Paleo: The Beginner’s Guide, Kindle Edition.

“Essentials of Managing Stress” by Brian Luke Seaward
from Essentials of Managing Stress
by Brian Luke Seaward
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

In an attempt to gain broader support in the health/fitness industry, the second edition featured a number of major changes from the first edition.

“ACSM's Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines” by American College of Sports Medicine
from ACSM’s Health/Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines
by American College of Sports Medicine
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2012

You’ll find all the exercise descriptions and photographs in Chapter 13.

“Testosterone Transformation: Lose Belly Fat, Build Muscle, and Boost Sexual Vitality” by Myatt Murphy, Jeff Csatari
from Testosterone Transformation: Lose Belly Fat, Build Muscle, and Boost Sexual Vitality
by Myatt Murphy, Jeff Csatari
Rodale Books, 2012

I have included a brief Chapter 4 at the end of Part One, which tells you how to use the various workouts in this book according to your specific needs.

“From XL to XS: A fitness guru's guide to changing your body” by Payal Gidwani Tiwari
from From XL to XS: A fitness guru’s guide to changing your body
by Payal Gidwani Tiwari
Random House Publishers India Pvt. Limited, 2011

Again, this is a general book about health and diet, so if you want to get all cuckoo for calories, fat, and protein and start training for an Ironman, there are much better books to help guide you on that journey.

“Skinny Bastard: A Kick-in-the-Ass for Real Men Who Want to Stop Being Fat and Start Getting Buff” by Rory Freedman, Kim Barnouin
from Skinny Bastard: A Kick-in-the-Ass for Real Men Who Want to Stop Being Fat and Start Getting Buff
by Rory Freedman, Kim Barnouin
ReadHowYouWant.com, Limited, 2010

In De sanitate tuenda, books 2—3, he writes at some length about the different ages of life, about exercise (including the longdistance exercise of riding and hunting) and fatigue.”

“Rethinking the Mediterranean” by Wendell V. Harris, William Vernon Harris, Columbia University (New York). Center for the Ancient Mediterranean. Conference. (2001: New York), Columbia University. Center for the Ancient Mediterranean
from Rethinking the Mediterranean
by Wendell V. Harris, William Vernon Harris, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2005

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

View all posts

404 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • If you are new: check the description, I put some information there. I hope it helped some people out and you liked it. It was actually quite hard to make and I’m not 100% happy with it. Let me know what you think of it. Next week could be light on content.

    Playlists:
    My best lore videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvIF22mOujY&list=PLvqIed90tYZoTeR0HFEY9ir6X31aLnazo
    Film/Book differences series https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qe-4l74B8mw&list=PLvqIed90tYZoiZZ-mAGxp6NnUrdURe0Uq

    Mistakes:

  • Read The Lost Road (vol IV of the History of Middle Earth) and you will see that all these features are there explicit. It’s a strange book, perhaps the strangest in Tolkien’s morphology, but considering it was written just before he started writing the lord of the rings it contains his vision, his Weltanschauung that led him to write eventually his masterpiece.

  • I kind of disagree with you regarding “canon”. Typical book/film canon isn’t quite like “religious canon” of old. Book/Film canon just means that while there IS room to fudge things there is still a underlying structure of characters, places, timeline, and events that are set in stone that you CAN’T alter without fundamentally altering the story.

    Same thing with Norse mythology. Some of Tolkien’s work is loosely based on Norse mythology, however you can’t replace half of Norse mythology with Tolkien’s work and still call it Norse mythology, because it wouldn’t be. Norse mythology HAS evolved over the centuries but NOT to the point where the Norse wouldn’t recognize it. That’s because certain people, things, and events ARE set in stone and they’ve never been changed (and more than likely never WILL be changed). That’s what book readers and film watchers would call “canon”.

    The word “canon” has itself evolved to mean more than the classic “religious dogma with hard rules” ideal. Canon can also just mean “upholding the known normal” or “upholding accepted principle” (like in written stories). The word “canon” itself isn’t quite as “hard core” as it used to be.

  • My dad bought me the books in 1985 when I was 10. I was consumed for 2 weeks while a devoured the stories. I have read them over so many times I’ve lost count. You do a phenomenal job. You should be very proud. Keep on.

  • Can anyone tell if there’s any actual English spelling differences between the American version and the UK´s HarperCollins edition? Trying to decide which deluxe edition to get atm.

  • I was a precocious child and insisted on reading The Silmarillion when I was around 11… I had watched the films and decided that was the best place to go… (God only knows why) I didn’t really understand it but it was enough to make me read the rest of the series and to this day The Silmarillion remains my favourite of Tolkiens works

    However, I 100% agree this is the best reading order to experience Middle Earth and actually appreciate each work the first time you read it!

  • “…they need a building code more than they need a White Council.”
    Uber-nerd humor at its best!

    Furthermore, it’s nice that Jackson and his production design crew took the fact of numerous ruins in middle earth to heart. The movies (especially the extended cuts) are replete with beautiful, evocative ruins.

  • Hey you! I am a Tolkien reader since the latest 1970 and have read all his works since then! Saw the first adaption film with the music of Bo Hansen and of course all the newer films! You are a good workman of the newer sense! But in deep, there are other and deeper sources, what younger people don’t get today! All that is gold don’t glitter, don’t be the same as a strider, I am like Tom Bombadil, a man without a father, but act like so!

  • I’d agree that ‘The Hobbit’ is the place to start for a younger reader (child or early teen); not necessarily for an adult reading Tolkien for the first time. It really depends on individual tastes.

  • The Silmarillion was without a doubt a feast for my burgeoning addiction to other worlds and realms. After watching that triumphant Peter Jackson LOTR trilogy, I consumed as much of Tolkien lore as humanly possible. I remember commuting to and from my Thankless job listening to the entire Silmarillion epic via audio CD in my ‘95 Nissan Sentra ����‍♂️. A damn good method of ignoring dreary Miami rush hour traffic way back when��������.

  • To be honest i find iT kinda hard to read the lord of the rings so i should begin with the hobbit then silmarillion then the main series then beren and luthien

  • I am adding a second comment because Siri misspelled the word I wanted to say the word was author, I suppose. Anyway, I truly liked this video, and thank you again.

  • Man…What an order…Can’t wait to start!!! I have already Done…
    Thanks for your opinion Mellon…Until oh A Livestream…I really hope to make it…Marion Baggins Out Voting!!!
    P.s Please Make me Make it…Please!!! P.ps if I don’t, Until June Mellon!!!

  • For those who don’t want to read Lord of the Rings, I recommend Phil Dragash’s audiobook soundscape. He does all the character voices, sound effects, and theme music. Very well done.

  • My 2020 resolution is reading all 3 LOTR Books. I hope I can get through it all cuz there are A lot of characters ect… that were not in the movies

  • The movies weren’t out when I first read the books. I had to wait 30 years. I read them every year for many years. I thought the movies were fabulous! I did talk my kids into reading the books before watching the movies.

  • Please do a whole lecture on the different speech styles. I was very interested to see that there is a whole graph worked out.

    In my view the different speech modes is one of the most important aspects of LOTR. It seems to get too little attention.

    I see Sam Gamgee taken from his garden as Joe Gargery taken from his smithy and dropped in the middle of the Bible and The Iliad. The whole contrast between a working class everyman and posh ancient folk is, I believe, the meat and potatoes of the LOTR.

  • ‘lord of the rings’ is written as though the hobbits recorded it. the stylist is meant to be hobbitish. that transforms it from a good book to a work of genius

  • Sorry but I thought this was dreadful! He’s entitled to his bizarre theories about ‘least informed narrator’ in any given situation but I don’t see it nor do I agree with it and I’d be willing to bet that Tolkien would have considered this pretentious waffle too.

  • Anybody ever read the Sword of Shannarah series by Terry Brooks? I always found similarities between the two. Shannarah was still a great series, but lost intersted after about the 6th book lol
    Too bad MTV destroyed the Shannara Chronicles show

  • Been sitting here listening to this Yahoo Yammer for nigh on 40 minutes expecting to gain some great revelation knowledge into the mind of JRR Tolkien only to arrive at an inevitable conclusion that, rather than being dazzled with brilliance, I have been baffled with bull$h!t!!!!!

    Here’s a hint as to how to read Tolkien: 1. From start to Finish; 2. From top to Bottom; 3: From left to Right!!!

  • Neat, I didn’t realize this was brand-new when I clicked on it. I am reading the Fall of Gondolin, and with the exception of having done Hobbit after Return of the King, I have read the books so far in your suggested order.:-) I do agree with the order (being in the middle of it as I am).

  • The Silmarillion is my all time favourite book (RIP EVERY SINGLE CHARACTER). I actually read it first so LotR was quite easy for me to read. (btw Fëanor did nothing wrong hehe). RIP Turin son of Hurin. He was a tragic character. The Unfinished Tales is practically a history book. I am also a die hard Tolkien fan and I agree with everything you said. I really want to order HoME (The History of Middle-Earth) series but I can’t afford 12 books:(

  • Children of Hurin is great if you’re overly happy at the time of reading and need to bring yourself back down.
    Seriously. It’ll hurt you.

  • The Hobbit was one of the books my mom read to me when i was a kid, alongside Astrid Lindgren’s works and the Moomintrolls series by Tove Jansson:’) and later in elementary school we studied some chapters in the literature class (in translation though, because english isn’t my first language). Back then I didn’t know much (or at all) about the sequel, I heard the words “Lord of the Rings” but it was very vague in my memory, so I didn’t know for sure if it was legit a book, or if I just imagined it XD because when I was reading The Hobbit, i often noticed little references to things far beyond the scope of the story, like when the party found the swords, and it was mentioned that they were most likely made in Gondolin, it made me wonder, what place that Gondolin was, and whether or not we were going to visit it XD
    I remember seeing the first LotR movie in a theathre because it came out around my 12th birthday, and that’s where we went to celebrate XD it left an impression, although i didn’t understand all of the events, haha.
    I read the LotR books when I was an adult already, a uni student, and stuck at home alone for the christmas holidays. I read the whole thing in 2 days (not leaving much time for sleep, lol), and then went straight ti Silmarillion. As a linguist myself, i can say it’s a must read for anyone who studies languages, and especially the English language!

    i read through the comments and saw mentions of other adaptations of the works (i remember seeing some of those). here’s an idea/question would you be interested in making a video about the alternative adaptations of Tolkien’s universe? that could be an interesting topic!

  • I feel like I’m the only person on earth who likes the hobbit movies lol. It probably helps that I didn’t really have any expectations going in but I don’t get why they’re so slated.

  • Great video. It’s really nice to know I’m not the only one passionate about Tolkien. This community is so lovely and your videos are great! See you next week!

  • I strongly believe that Sam’s simple line “Well, I’m back” fully encapsulates everything that is great about LotR, and here’s Dr. Drout giving an hour-long presentation to make that point.

  • It’s mandatory to watch Rankin and Bass cartoons of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings before watching Peter Jackson’s LOTR an The Hobbit.

  • The most negative thing one could say about Tolkien’s mythology is that he was never able tae finish it. I can only how much more he would have written.

  • I’d love to see a video on the friendship between Lewis and Tolkien! Have you read his essay On Fairy-Stories? I haven’t gotten around to it yet, but it seems like something up your alley.

  • i am starting now reading the books with the hobbit. 3/4 through the book and i think it’s an excellent starting point for younger readers. after reading the book the movies have become nearly unwatchable like it happened for me with the first harry potter movie:( i fear reading the lord of the rings books for what they can do to the movies for me. it just feels like i’m watching a speedrun of the book. yes i am a new reader. haven’t read much before so i guess i have to still adapt to this but it’s honestly hard!

  • It’s mandatory to watch Rankin and Bass cartoons of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings before watching Peter Jackson’s LOTR an The Hobbit.

  • There are some very strange mistakes in this documentary. Firstly, Sauron didn’t build Dol Guldur it was likely built by Oropher, Thranduil’s father, before he and his people fled to the north of Mirkwood. The King of the Dead betrayed Isildur, not Elendil. Merry didn’t kill the Witch King he was able to wound him using a dagger designed for such a purpose and this allowed Éowyn to deal the fatal blow. And Frodo was imprisoned by orcs from the tower of Cirith Ungol, not from Minas Morgul.

    Someone as exacting as Tolkien would be spinning in his grave to hear such bloopers. Please do your research the next time you attempt something like this.

  • I love your enthusiasm and your commentary!
    Speaking as an older person, I commend your choices!
    I’ve got later impressions of LOTR (1st and second editions)
    All of the History of Middle Earth (as first published)
    In fact. pretty much everything Tolkien, or his son Christopher Tolkien published.
    They take up a lot of space in my office!
    Also about 15 books owned by his son, Michael. All inscribed in similar manner to JRRT’s symbolic style.
    It’s great to see a young generation still appreciates the work of this Great Man.
    Thank you for posting.
    Very Best Wishes to you!

  • About a month ago, I moved out of my parent’s house to go to college. And since I had a long bus journey ahead of me, and wanted to start a new chapter in many possible ways, I decided to look for a new book (series) to pour my soul into and devour. So, I needed something excellent. I wanted a new Harry Potter, something I didn’t have since… well, Harry Potter. And for those reasons, I picked up the first part of LOTR and went on my way into the world.
    I struggled through the prologue. But already within the first few pages of actual story, I noticed that… the writing was kind of charming. It was witty and slow paced and very enjoyable. So I continued. And at some point, I’m not sure how it happened, I realized that, holy shit, this was it. This was actually all I had hoped for and more, this really was my next Harry Potter, my next world to helplessly fall in love with and my next fandom to spend hours upon hours on.

    I finished the books last week, and I cried so fucking much, but it was good crying. Like, I’ll never get to discover it all for the first time again, but I WILL read it again, and again and again, and there are still three absolutely phenomenal movies to watch and mountains of fanfiction to read and dumb memes to laugh at and now all of this is my life.
    I never intended to link the start of my own big journey into life so inseparably with the journey of the fellowship, but I did and it fits in a kind of poetic way that I really like ( even though I really hope I’m not headed to Mordor lol).

    Tolkien was just as incredible as everyone says he was. The books hold up after like 70 years, the movies hold up after almost 20 years, and I firmly believe both will continue to do so.

    (Also I got a new OTP out of it and like, that’s more than I could have ever hoped for. Frodo and Sam, it’s so perfect that it hurts…)

  • I’m reading The Hobbit now and am finding that even though it’s a children’s book technically, I overthink it and turn it into such a complex story that I find myself worried about not understanding every nuance. Or maybe I just have ADD or something. Haha

  • A Tolkien Bestiarium is a nice illustrated book for beginners an pros.
    I started reading the Hobbit, The lord of the ring, Silmarillion, Lost tales etc. in my early teens more than 40 years ago. I’m a big Tolkien fan since that time. I love good fantasy an SF stories/books. Dune series is another favorite.

  • Duane Allman was a master guitarist and one of the founding members of the Allman Brothers Band. He named his daughter, Galadriel, after the Tolkien character.

  • No spoilers, but there is 100% an homage to J.R.R. Tolkien’s work in the final episode of Game of Thrones. I won’t say it but when you watch the episode you’ll know what I mean

  • I started with the silmarillion. And I hope that the amazon prime series about the 2nd age of middle earth will be “good?” because the main characters didn’t really exist in the books… By the way I agree with you that the silmarillion is easy to read its like reading some old versions of the bible.

  • I first watched the movies so I read The Silmarillion first since I already knew what Middle-Earth was about and I was interested in the backstory, then The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, I’ll continue with The Unfinished Tales and then The History of Middle-Earth this summer

  • Thank you so much for this video!! I’m into his books right now. I love to visit Middle earth in books. ❤ May I ask where you bought your Tolkien books?

  • I love john and i love his books soooo much but just few novels by him transulated to arabic so i need to have very good english to read them.. Im working on that but that will take along time and im excited to read them cause i read the hobbit.. it was great��❤❤

  • mostly autumn! first heard of them in this doc, and since them, they became one of my favourite bands. very nice and nostalgic to watch it again.

  • I am watching this for homework cuz i don’t wanna read the books and watch the all the movies to write about it for home work �� (No offence 2 Tolkien though i’m sure he is a amazing writer!)

  • The Fall of Gondolin was absolutely horrible, and not worth the read or the money. However, The children of Húrin was an amazing story! I love almost all of Tolkien’s work!

  • Children of Hurin is great if you’re overly happy at the time of reading and need to bring yourself back down.
    Seriously. It’ll hurt you.

  • My knowledgeable friend. I really don’t think anyone can be a true expert on Tolkien. But you do a fantastic job at it! Thanks for another great video!

  • (Order from this video)
    1. The Hobbit
    2. The Lord of the Rings
    The Fellowship of the Ring
    The Two Towers
    The Return of the King
    3. The Silmarillion
    4. The Great Tales
    Beren and Luthien
    Children of Hurin
    The Fall of Gondolin
    5. Unfinished Tales
    6. History of Middle Earth
    The Book of Lost Tales, Part I
    The Book of Lost Tales, Part II
    The Lays of Beleriand
    The Shaping of Middle-earth
    The Lost Road and Other Writings
    The Return of the Shadow
    The Treason of Isengard
    The War of the Ring
    Sauron Defeated
    Morgoth’s Ring
    The War of the Jewels
    The Peoples of Middle-earth
    7. Letters of Tolkien
    8. Tom Bombadil
    Bilbo’s Last Words
    9. (Other books by individuals who have analyzed Tolkien’s work.)

    Thank you Yoystan for providing this content and making it easy and fun to dive into Tolkien’s world!

  • I have not read him…perhaps he would be down with using a font difference in the future. Doing the back catalogue would be an editorial task of epic proportions but with computers hey…..red letter Tolkien time.

  • Hi! I’ve already read the LOTR in Italian and I’m wondering to start reading in english. Which book do you reccomend to a non-native spakers? I’m thinking that maybe reading again the all saga could be intresting, but I’m a little afraid about the difficoulty of the language… what do you think? Maybe the Hobbit is esaier? Thank you very much for your help

  • Actually, i feel that Dr Drout is pitching way above the cognitive ability of the audience. He deserves much more than the feedback he gets back from his audience not even close to if he had pitched a responsive audience try Oxbridge please. Indeed this lecture would’ve been best pitched to Prof Tolkien’s college…

  • Game of Thrones has now ended, now the Lord of the Rings will take up it’s rightful place as ruler of all. The crownless again shall be king.

  • I see a possible parallel between the Hobbits’ journey to Mordor and Tolkiens’ boyhood move from the country to the polluted city.

  • I was wanting to buy the Hobbit Companion by David Day and now I am having second thoughts about that. What do you think. Would it be a wasted purchase even if the pictures are good?

  • Tolkien was the best not because of his legendarium, He is distinguished from others because of his linguistic brilliance and capability of speaking countless languages……..quote by an unknown YouTuber

  • I read them all until the History of Middle-Earth (HOME); but started with LOTR before the Hobbit, and read them each three times. Have recently ordered HOME much thanks to @themenofthewest and the upcoming LOTR tv-series in 2021 that have sparked my renewed interest to delve deeper into the fantastic works of Tolkien!:)

  • Actually the Silmarillion was finished in 1930 before the hobbit but then, because it was the begining of everything he had to adapt and rewrite the silmarillion to adapt it to the hobbit and after that to the lotr but he died before he could adapt it to the lotr. So it was finished even before the hobbit. Most people don’t know this.

  • stuff also gets ruined because people steal the building the materials. For example: the roof of Fountains Abbey; Canterbury Castle; The Flavian Ampitheater.

  • This video is a class on both Tolkien, and how to use horrible timing with half decent jokes, and how to butcher the german language.

  • New subscriber here, not new to Tolkien, but I have loads to learn. I read The Hobbit and then The Lord of the Rings 30 years ago. The film did not disappoint. I didn’t like The Hobbit films at first, but now I do, despite its flaws. The extended DVD sets of both film series are highly recommended. I look forward to checking out more of your videos thank you!

  • Perfect advice for further reading of Tolkien. I too started with the hobbit, then lord of the rings, then the silmarillion. I will get children of huran and unfinished tales next. Thank you! I love you Leynes

  • Nice work, i found it very informative and I personally can’t wait to read the silmarillion, i Will say though while i Havent read a lot of tolkien i have read the hobbit and I gotta say while i respect your opinion i have to say i prefer the movies, mainly for giving the dwarves more personality and giving Bard a more Prominent role in the story and setting him up rather than just being some guy Who shows up out of the blue, plus Benedict Cumberbatch is always a win, unpopular opinion i know but I do still see why People love the book

  • I was disappointed to hear you say the movies weren’t good. I am a fan if Tolkien ‘s books AND love the movies. The script was kept as close as possible to the novels which is RARE. Yes there were differences and things left out but I have NEVER seen a movie hold so close to the book before. That being said, watching the movies after reading the books, helped me straighten out not just geographical confusions I had, but also character haziness. One long character description at the beginning of meeting a new person, doesn’t always remain crystal clear through the length of 3 large novels. The movies helped solidify the images for the next reading. Who am I kidding, I’ve read AND watched the movies numerous times and each time discovering something new I had missed each time.
    I don’t usually comment on posts, but I couldn’t help myself when you expressed displeasure in what I consider a very difficult and commendable job at keeping the movies so close to the books. Should you want a HORRIBLE example of that, watch Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy. With the teaspoon of the book they took the movie from, they managed to go off the rails and never find them again not even 10 minutes in. I waited SO LONG for that movie, but walked out 20 minutes in. The only reason I ever watched the whole was because my husband begged. I still could barely make it.

    Sorry for the long rant but I just think that you are not seeing the biggest benefit to not just readers for some clarifying points, but the publicity it brought the books. If not for the movies, I doubt that over half the people that have read them since, would’ve taken the time to read them all. That would’ve been their loss too.

  • Tbh I would do unfinished tales before BEFORE Silmarillion because it is much closer to the story of LOTR.
    Also read the Complete History DEAD LAST. It is vast and daunting and only for the most experienced. Instead read his other worlds outside of ME I would say

  • Duane Allman was a master guitarist and one of the founding members of the Allman Brothers Band. He named his daughter, Galadriel, after the Tolkien character.

  • The Lord of the Rings series (LoTR) is a shitty tale. Nothing much happens in anywhere in the book. That idiot Gandalf, foolish Frodo, their companions are just wandering from one point to other point. So many plans get cancelled. Also the ring is too much over-hyped as no one knows what it actually does or at least there is no mention of any good episode about its magical powers.

    The books are too verbose. Too less of action and higher percentage of the book is filled with the description of nature, trees, mountains, hills and people.

    This series is utter nonsense.

    Tolkein has made fool of many readers. And he has been successful in his evil endeavour.

  • Wagner rip-off. Three part opera (LOTR) with a prelude (Hobbit) about a powerful magic ring that is evil. The stories are basically the same thing but Tolkien would never admit the truth that for the most part it was based in it. There are unique narrative elements in Wagner that are NOT present in the Norse myths which Tolkien utilized, yet everyone either is ignorant of this or ignores it. It’s undeniable. No Wagner, no LOTR.

  • The Cats of Queen Beruthiel were explained in Unfinished Tales. Queen Beruthiel was the wife of Tarannon Falastur, 12th king of Gondor. She was a witch, who trained her ten cats to act as her spies. Her husband eventually banished her from his kingdom and she was last seen in a boat, sailing south, accompanied only by her cats.

  • The evocative feeling of ruins and nostalgia that is distant yet present is a good insight.

    I think of the story of Tolkien as a professor reading Beowulf to his students with full intensity as one of the poets would have long ago and them viscerally understanding Beowulf and ancient English poetry even though they didn’t understand old English.

    For an Anglo-American audience, the sense that celts, then the splendor of Rome, then the time of Beowulf, then Chaucer, that all of these things flow through them just as fully as the modern world is powerful to experience, and fiction that touches these deeper stories and histories that live on in us and our culture (from an Anglo-descended perspective).

    That’s one of the reasons I loved black panther so much; for me the way Tolkien is able to take the basic spirit of English deep history and tap into it in his world building was the way the creators of black panther were able to do the same thing from an Afrocentric place, and thus give instant access to a deep history of place and people through fictional characters in a way that might be harder with straight history.

  • 1:30 Oh but you are wrong; it’s not 3 novels, it’s just 1 big and long and wonderful novel that the publisher forced Professor Tolkien to publish in the form of 3 tomes, and the 6 books are just divisions greater than chapters.

  • I had to smile when I saw you hold up your copy of the Silmarillion with all the bookmarks sticking out of the side.

    @ 7:34 “The most complete version of the narn.”:D Only people who have read it already will have caught what you said.

  • Man, you’ve save my money. I had my finger ready to pay for David Day’s collection, but i looked for some reference and then you appear. Thanks you

  • I remember my dad reading The Hobbit to me as a child and I also watched the Lord Of The Rings movies and read the books. I never did get to the Silmarillion though. These were always fond memories for me (spanning from when I was 6 until I was 10). Now, at 17, I’m revisiting the wonderful world of Middle Earth with fresh eyes. I started with the movies and I was about to start on the books when I encountered this video. Definitely a helpful video and now I have an even longer reading list than before. It seems this beloved part of my childhood shall now become a beloved part of my coming adulthood too.

    (A sidenote on the video: While it’s a wonderful video. I had to put the speed down to.75 in order to understand and process it because you talk so fast.)

  • Top notch video, as always!

    I was made aware of Mr. Day’s unreliable authorship while browsing through one of the reddit forums dedicated to The Professor, and have taken care since to stay away from his works, despite the great illustrations and neat packaging that they seem to possess.

    For someone building his Tolkien collection of books, I think it is extremely important to spend the money where it is deserved, especially if the book(s) don’t come cheap!

    I would be highly interested to know your views on the other guide, the Complete Tolkien Companion by J.E.A Tyler.

    Also, for a future video, if possible, please do a comparative analysis of some of the art books belonging to the Legendarium (Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator, The Art of the Hobbit, The Art of The Lord of The Rings, Middle Earth Traveller, The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit Sketchbook) so that anyone looking to buy their first art book, can pick 1 or 2 as a starting point (depending on their taste and the knowledge provided in the video). These books aren’t cheap, so can’t just splurge on most of them. A video will definitely help!

  • Your one volume paperback of Lord of the Rings is the same as the one I own. My hardcover book of The Silmarillion is also the same as yoursI received it as a Christmas present back in 1977 from my brother. It’s one of the prettiest books I own. I love the physical book, but I thought the story of The Silmarillion was a bit slow and hard to read with all the names and places. The Lord of the Rings is longer, but it is much easier for me to read and comprehend. I still have a movie edition of the 1979 cartoon of The Hobbit. I have owned that paperback since the 1970’s and it might be pretty rare now. Some people don’t like the cartoon version, but I rather enjoyed it. I loved Tolkien’s translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (my brother gave me that book too). On the whole Tolkien requires more patience to read than C. S. Lewis (Lewis is faster paced and not as wordy), but I think I like them both about equally.

  • I can still remember checking out my first Tolkien book, the Hobbit, from my school library, then getting home, crawling into bed and reading “In a hole in the ground, there lived a Hobbit.” for the first time. And as fate would have it, the trailer for the first movie came out later that day.

  • Hi, can you tell me about the height of this paperback version of ‘ The Silmarillion’? I was going to buy it I i don’t know whether it will fit it in my book shelf or not

  • I have never read lotr because my mother was a controlling Christian no Harry potter or lotr because devil crap im 21 now and i realized I’m on my phone 8 hours a day I watched the movies behind my mom’s back when I was 10 now I want to get into this books cause i like the movies and also to take A break from my phone for abit

  • These books are one of the best stories of all time. I felt the movies changes or added things that didn’t need to be and was not happy with them. Though I did like the earlier movie that was more cartoon but did a much better job of being more in tune with the books.
    He invented a new world and made it real. A mark of a great writer. I lost count of how many times I’ve read them over the years but I never got tired of reading them

  • I asked my high schooler son what books were popular on campus, ones the kids were reading just for fun, not assigned. We had The Hobbit and The Once and Future King. He looked at me like I had just sprouted a second head.��‍♀️

  • I’m not a philologist, but even I know that Tolkien was the person that put the words precisely where they should be because languages were his speciality, and he was truly thorough when creating his world and its history peoples, languages etc. This is what happens to people when no one reads them fairy tales of different peoples and cultures when they are kids, and they don’t read books of different writers from different nations and historical backgrounds they get narrow-minded and don’t understand the usage of old fashioned words, archaisms and characteristics of protagonists and antagonists of the stories. It was nice listening to this lecture, but I don’t need explanations of Tolkien’s motivation or anything like that to enjoy his works… Nostalgia yeah, may not be popular, but anyone who has felt deep nostalgia and longing for what has been and is gone, for the passing of time and seeing birds leave to go to the south in autumn anyone will understand the feeling Tolkien has weaved into his writings…

  • Really interesting video! Gonna use it whenever someone asks me why I wouldn’t necessarily recommend his works.
    Even though I admit to falling victim to the pretty new editions…haha.

  • Hobbit -> LotR Trilogy -> Return of the King Appendix -> Similrillian -> The rest of the books & notes in no particular order -> reread Hobbit & LotR with renewed appreciation and context

  • Sorry but I thought this was dreadful! He’s entitled to his bizarre theories about ‘least informed narrator’ in any given situation but I don’t see it nor do I agree with it and I’d be willing to bet that Tolkien would have considered this pretentious waffle too.

  • With the last seasons of Game of thrones being turned into dog’s dinner by the writers.
    I need the upcoming LOTR series to fill the void that has been left in my chest.

  • I didn’t get the chance to read the and never will be because of you I learned so much about the history of Tolkien thank you so much, hope you reach 100k subscribers or more:)

  • What does he mean that Tolkien’s work is not literature! Pop culture? Not at all. It is epic Prose in the tradition of Beowulf and the Norse Sagas

  • Just got The Hobbit and L.O.T.R books and when they get here (delayed delivery due to COVID-19����) i will get into them after i finish IT by Stephen King…Just got into reading and i love it��Great video and thanks for talking about these books��������✌��

  • Too many people never read the appendices because The main story is over.but there is just SO much information in there that it’s a complete waste to skip it.

  • At first I struggled and didn’t understand the first 100 pages of the silmarilion, I scrapped that, I then restarted and concentrated on what I was reading creating a vivid world in my mind using my mind I understood the book and as each page went on I got addicted and the pictures that depicted were truly beautiful. I then read children of hurin in a couple days, then I read the beautiful sad story of the fall of gondolin, which I wish was explored more by the man himself. I wish there was more, I really do.

  • Well writtten script, competently delivered. Aweful, aweful comedic timing. Reading it from paper doomed his chances of any of the jokes (which were fine) ever landing

  • you are an amazing youtuber and I regret to see that you are not as active as you were before, I enjoy your middle earth tour videos and I can’t wait for you to do more, I also enjoyed your a middle earth traveler book video and I have it now, so thanks for that I guess lol

  • I love john and i love his books soooo much but just few novels by him transulated to arabic so i need to have very good english to read them.. Im working on that but that will take along time and im excited to read them cause i read the hobbit.. it was great��❤❤

  • I didn’t get the chance to read the and never will be because of you I learned so much about the history of Tolkien thank you so much, hope you reach 100k subscribers or more:)

  • How would we want to read these in chronological order? That’s my main question I’ve read the hobbit and lord of the rings and grew up on the books and movies. I’ve always wanted to read the other books but never gotten around to it

    EDIT: I know you said about the letters what show chronological orders in your opinion but with ALL the books what would the best order be??

  • Beren and Lúthien,The Children of Húrin, and The Fall of Gondolin could be considered a trilogy and should be considered for a future movie trilogy.

  • Been sitting here listening to this Yahoo Yammer for nigh on 40 minutes expecting to gain some great revelation knowledge into the mind of JRR Tolkien only to arrive at an inevitable conclusion that, rather than being dazzled with brilliance, I have been baffled with bull$h!t!!!!!

    Here’s a hint as to how to read Tolkien: 1. From start to Finish; 2. From top to Bottom; 3: From left to Right!!!

  • Have you read the Book of Lost Tales (I and II)? The story of Tinuviel is charming. It’s the ancestor of Beren and Luthien, but reads more like a fairy tale. Sauron appears as Tevildo, Lord of the Cats.

    I’m surprised that you found LotR dense but not the Silmarillion:-)

    I read LotR out loud to my kids when they were 5 and 9. They begged me to skip the Council of Elrond so I did skip ahead there a bit.:-D

  • I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, this is by far the best Middle-Earth lore channel in existence. I love your strict rule of using no images from the movies. The images and dialogue are so well put together.

  • I nearly passed over this and I’m glad I didn’t.

    I read LotR in the 70’s as a boy and it deeply impacted me. Unbeknown to me at the time Tolkien lived where I was born and holidayed at his aunts house and played in the hills and fields where I lived from age 3. The sense of place still stays with me. Now I can see (imagine?)the impact the area had on Tolkien….the woodland, ancient oaks, streams, lakes. The medieval timbered pubs with the old men, barmaids, locally brewed beers and ciders. The accents and appearance of rural Worcestershire folk. The distant hills of Wales, Shropshire.

    http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/1065-Bag-End-A-Very-English-Place.php

    It’s worth a visit.

  • Hi, I was wondering, it’s my brother’s birthday soon and I want to buy a present. You have the Art of Lord of the Rings and the Art of the Hobbit. Which one would you recommend for an avid LOTR fan, My brother really likes to dive deep into the theoretical aspects as well (he kinda learned Elfish, stuff like that and the whole history of the world)

  • I have not read him…perhaps he would be down with using a font difference in the future. Doing the back catalogue would be an editorial task of epic proportions but with computers hey…..red letter Tolkien time.

  • There is a whole series by cristopher tolkien based on history of middle earth. It has twelve volumes:
    1 The book of lost tales part 1
    2 The book of lost tales part 2
    3 The lays of beleriand
    4 The shaping of middle earth
    5 The lost road and other writings
    6 The return of the shadow
    7 The treason of isengard
    8 The war of the ring
    9 Sauron defeated
    10 Morgoth’s ring
    11 The war of the jewels
    12 the peoples of middle earth

  • chuckling i think the mass news actually thinks you can be persuaded to see me as Quest:) it couldn’t get any more allegorical ��

  • I used to be scared to read Lord of the Rings but ever since then I read all of the published Game of Thrones books (well, the main ones not the novellas) and I am hoping that it will be my next successful read-through. Starting with the Hobbit.:)

  • The Silmarillion was without a doubt a feast for my burgeoning addiction to other worlds and realms. After watching that triumphant Peter Jackson LOTR trilogy, I consumed as much of Tolkien lore as humanly possible. I remember commuting to and from my Thankless job listening to the entire Silmarillion epic via audio CD in my ‘95 Nissan Sentra ����‍♂️. A damn good method of ignoring dreary Miami rush hour traffic way back when��������.

  • I picked this book up today to hopefully get better at English because reading apparently helps with that, so im gonna go start reading this now, wish me luck:)

  • The Lord of the Rings series (LoTR) is a shitty tale. Nothing much happens in anywhere in the book. That idiot Gandalf, foolish Frodo, their companions are just wandering from one point to other point. So many plans get cancelled. Also the ring is too much over-hyped as no one knows what it actually does or at least there is no mention of any good episode about its magical powers.

    The books are too verbose. Too less of action and higher percentage of the book is filled with the description of nature, trees, mountains, hills and people.

    This series is utter nonsense.

    Tolkein has made fool of many readers. And he has been successful in his evil endeavour.

  • So I’m curious-how does one measure the effectiveness of the LKC method? It’s praised here, yet it’s not at all rare. It’s used in J J Abrams’ recent Star Wars: The Force Awakens as a way to deliver the story to ‘catch people up’ on the state of the galaxy….yet that movie was little more than a pop culture roller coaster of sanitized fan service comprised of strung-together emotional leitmotifs crafted to pluck each appropriate heart string to qualify it as a major Hollywood film. In short, the LKC method was used but it didn’t save the film.

    Is it a combination of Tolkien’s methods that makes LOTR what it is? Is it simply the voice with which he wrote it? Was it a lucky strike? I feel like a lot of the analysis with broken references and such is nice, but these are things studied and implemented by many of today’s major storytellers….but why so often does it fall flat even when executed by the book?

  • Table of Content
    >Learning by Knowledge Construction (LKC) [ 12:19]
    >>Zusammenhang of pseudo references/broken reference[ 25:14]
    >Philologists are the tribologists of text [ 42:22]
    >>Transcendental references[ 46:23]
    >Summary[ 53:04]

  • I watched this just after the 80th anniversary of the publishing of “The Hobbit”. Make sure you have the hour to commit to this program. It is very insightful and added a new level of my understanding of the Sage of Middle Earth.

  • The Hobbit was the book that introduced me to this beautifully world and I hope that everyone who read some of Tolkiens book’s is gonna fall in love in it as I did.

  • Can anyone tell if there’s any actual English spelling differences between the American version and the UK´s HarperCollins edition? Trying to decide which deluxe edition to get atm.

  • very easy. Tolkien was motivated by love. not money or fame or pursuit of intellectual or artistic excellence. his work has a soul and reader with a soul can feel it.

  • 1:30 Oh but you are wrong; it’s not 3 novels, it’s just 1 big and long and wonderful novel that the publisher forced Professor Tolkien to publish in the form of 3 tomes, and the 6 books are just divisions greater than chapters.

  • The Silmarillion is my all time favourite book (RIP EVERY SINGLE CHARACTER). I actually read it first so LotR was quite easy for me to read. (btw Fëanor did nothing wrong hehe). RIP Turin son of Hurin. He was a tragic character. The Unfinished Tales is practically a history book. I am also a die hard Tolkien fan and I agree with everything you said. I really want to order HoME (The History of Middle-Earth) series but I can’t afford 12 books:(

  • I love how interestingly you talk about it! And I also love that you find Silmarillion his most important work,just imagining what it could have been were he able to finish it…nonetheless I consider it the most insteresting piece of Fiction ever. It is the most important book for myself.
    I have not heard you mention the History of Middle Earth. You may have already read it, since it is quite an older video now. If you have not I recommend it even though I have not read it myself yet as I do not own the books, except the 12th one. It is basically full of additional and early material from Silmarillion, Hobbit and LOTR I think. There are some early texts and whatnot too. I think that if you loved Silmarillion,this is a way to go as it will give you even more information nd background of the work.

  • Honestly, somehow this is my favorite video of yours and I can’t say why. Feels like that is unfair, given that your other (btw really awesome!) videos took way more preparation and work.

  • That was done very well and I appreciate your hard work. I would weigh in on the subject of which to experience first by saying that I would watch the film’s first. I’m sure devotees would think this the lazy way out but I’ve had to many bad experiences reading an awesome book first then being terribly disappointed by the movie (which I was so eager to see!). My first and most traumatic example was the book ET-The Extraterrestrial. I read it and read it again (it’s very short) and then was so excited to go to the theater only to jump up about half way through, audibly sigh my disapproval and leave. So much was changed from my beloved story that ET-The Movie was reduced to politics. My initial reading of the Hobbit and LoTR was done so about 30 years prior to the first movies coming out so I did not remember the details at all by the time the movies appeared. That was a good thing. I reiterate, I advise watching the movies first and then you will be inspired to read the TRUE stories and end up loving both!
    Second item I wanted to mention… I believe that the cover art of the Hobbit book in your video (2nd Ed.?), The reclining dragon, can be seen in the art work opening credits of the movie “Monsters Inc”. I just noticed it after a gazillion videos of yours and others. Anyway, if you look at it and agree then we can call it trivia. Again good work, sorry for this book of my own here!

  • “…they need a building code more than they need a White Council.”
    Uber-nerd humor at its best!

    Furthermore, it’s nice that Jackson and his production design crew took the fact of numerous ruins in middle earth to heart. The movies (especially the extended cuts) are replete with beautiful, evocative ruins.

  • I’d posted a comment here long time ago said that I’ve really needed a script of his lecture in English, so I can translate it into my mother tongue and then share this wonderful lecture among our fandom. But now I cannot see that comment anywhere.:( There was a generous guy said that he can make a transcription for me. But because that comment was vanished, I’ve lost contact with him. Today, I post this comment again, hope to regain contact with that guy, or seek out another help from you who can understand every words of this lecture. I really want to translate this, but my listening skills are not good enough to understand the entire lecture in details. Please help me!

  • stuff also gets ruined because people steal the building the materials. For example: the roof of Fountains Abbey; Canterbury Castle; The Flavian Ampitheater.

  • I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, this is by far the best Middle-Earth lore channel in existence. I love your strict rule of using no images from the movies. The images and dialogue are so well put together.

  • I started with the silmarillion. And I hope that the amazon prime series about the 2nd age of middle earth will be “good?” because the main characters didn’t really exist in the books… By the way I agree with you that the silmarillion is easy to read its like reading some old versions of the bible.

  • Loved this and needed it. I’m reading the Silmarillion now and it’s a bit overwhelming. So I’m going to follow this order. Still gonna keep readinh the silmarillion tho. I love it.

  • I have a friend who read The Silmarillion, before he read The Lord Of The Rings. He didnt even see the movies at the time he read The Silmarillion.

  • Wow… I have had my head in a hobbit hole! I have read the Hobbit, the Trilogy LOTR, and the Silmarillion… multiple times, and I knew there were a few other books… but I never knew there were as many as you mentioned! Now I will have to look into these others!

  • Just finished reading the Hobbit yesterday for the first time, amazing book. At the moment I have only read the prologue of The Fellowship of The Ring and at any moment will begin to read the book. Luckily I have a friend who has read most of the lotr books so I usually tell him when I am for example half way through the book. It motivates me a lot because he always tells me how good the books are, asks me what part was my favorite, etc, etc. Very excited!!!!!!!

  • I was a precocious child and insisted on reading The Silmarillion when I was around 11… I had watched the films and decided that was the best place to go… (God only knows why) I didn’t really understand it but it was enough to make me read the rest of the series and to this day The Silmarillion remains my favourite of Tolkiens works

    However, I 100% agree this is the best reading order to experience Middle Earth and actually appreciate each work the first time you read it!

  • So glad I saw this. I always loved the films and wanted to delve back into the books despite their longevity. Having the chronological order gives me a new perspective on the whole outline of Tolkien’s world.

  • That was great to learn a bit more about LotR before the movies hit. I’m reading the books for the first time finally. I know I waited way too long. What a great look at the rebirth of modern fantasy thanks to Tolkien and his great skill and interest.

  • I have literally been looking for this for 2 years. This just came up in my suggested at the perfect time because I just started a reread and have only read the main 4

  • P.s I love this YouTube page! Sorry I dont know how to spell your name or I would mention you by name so sorry lol. But great page my friend!

  • Hi! I’ve already read the LOTR in Italian and I’m wondering to start reading in english. Which book do you reccomend to a non-native spakers? I’m thinking that maybe reading again the all saga could be intresting, but I’m a little afraid about the difficoulty of the language… what do you think? Maybe the Hobbit is esaier? Thank you very much for your help

  • Not sure what he is driving at? And I do not really care as this is uninteresting mostly opinionated nothing to learn or to even try to follow. Could not finish or I did not want to.

  • Rant sequence: INITIATED

    I finished the Lord of the Rings about a month and a half ago.

    It was an incredibly emotional experience for me.

    An old friend made a completely self-produced (and rather melancholic) dungeon synth album that was inspired by LOTR/Tolkien, which I encourage you to give a listen if you ever intend on or are currently reading Tolkien:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKcFKFBT2mY&list=PLmca-HoKiShlhG9POpIPedRQsc5rlAJkI
    Seriously, this album on repeat while reading LOTR was an awesome mood-setter and complemented the atmosphere beautifully. It was also partially what made reading this book such an emotional experience.

    The Lord of the Rings was easily, easily, the greatest book I’d ever touched.
    Tolkien’s world is really such an unbelievably beautiful and special thing and I’m glad that I was able to cross paths with it.
    It does my heart good to know that there was a person like Tolkien who gave life to such a miraculous world that has touched so many people.

    I felt that I needed some time off between LOTR and the Silmarillion.
    From what I’ve seen, people make the Silmarillion seem like a real time commitment/textbook-type read, which has made it difficult for me to find the motivation to read it.
    Watching this video has given me some clarity and reignited the spark I needed to start reading again.
    Thank you!

    Rant sequence: TERMINATED

  • Perfect advice for further reading of Tolkien. I too started with the hobbit, then lord of the rings, then the silmarillion. I will get children of huran and unfinished tales next. Thank you! I love you Leynes

  • This is the order I would recommend really. I tried to read the sillmarillion it was exceedingly complex and unless you read Tolkien’s 4 most well known books first, you’re in for one helluva hangover after reading Tolkien’s first and last book

  • It always amazes me how big of a world Tolkien created for “only” four (or seven) books. I’m curious: Did he (to our knowledge) ever planned to write “real” new books? Like a new trilogy or something?

  • Reading LotR without the appendices is like watching the movies in non-extended edition… There is something missing.

    Also the appendices are great preparation before starting the silmarillion or children of Hiring as they are written slightly different.

  • The evocative feeling of ruins and nostalgia that is distant yet present is a good insight.

    I think of the story of Tolkien as a professor reading Beowulf to his students with full intensity as one of the poets would have long ago and them viscerally understanding Beowulf and ancient English poetry even though they didn’t understand old English.

    For an Anglo-American audience, the sense that celts, then the splendor of Rome, then the time of Beowulf, then Chaucer, that all of these things flow through them just as fully as the modern world is powerful to experience, and fiction that touches these deeper stories and histories that live on in us and our culture (from an Anglo-descended perspective).

    That’s one of the reasons I loved black panther so much; for me the way Tolkien is able to take the basic spirit of English deep history and tap into it in his world building was the way the creators of black panther were able to do the same thing from an Afrocentric place, and thus give instant access to a deep history of place and people through fictional characters in a way that might be harder with straight history.

  • I use the audiobooks because I’m too busy to read, was finally able to listen to the Lord of the Rings (minus the Appendices) and got to listen to Sir Christopher Lee read the Children of Hurin. Next on my list is Silmarilion or the Hobbit (even though the Hobbit was the first I did read as a physical book.
    Some what if ideas:
    What if Faenor had survived the Battle under the Stars and lead the Noldor during the First Age.
    What if the Fellowship had gone tot he Grey Havens and sailed down the coast to Gondor and the Up the Anduin to get to Mordor.
    And an April Fools style video, What if Faenor, after the Silmarils were stolen just shrugged it off and cut his loses and went to have a pint with his seven sons instead.

  • Thank you for reading order. I read the hobbit long time ago so I decided to read all of tolkiens work cause I have some free time lately. I thought I should read it in chronological order but thank you for stopping me.

  • Yes another one of these videos!

    Gotta love the Tolkien videos by Pontus, accompanied by Adrian’s music. I already own this [in fact I believe I recommend it to you!] yet this was still interesting to watch.

    I quite enjoyed that so much of it was fold-out pages.

    There are two other Tolkien-related books that exist that greatly supplement his works:

    The Complete Guide to Middle-earth: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-Guide-Middle-earth-Hobbit-Silmarillion/dp/0007169426/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503424997&sr=1-1&keywords=complete+guide+to+middle-earth

    and, The Maps of Tolkien’s Middle-earth: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Maps-Tolkiens-Middle-earth-Special/dp/0007169701/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503425051&sr=1-3&keywords=the+maps+of+tolkien%27s+middle-earth

  • Tolkien was the best not because of his legendarium, He is distinguished from others because of his linguistic brilliance and capability of speaking countless languages……..quote by an unknown YouTuber

  • I read the Silmarillion first, am reading it a second time ’cause I love the First Age and elves so much, and I’m also reading Fellowship of the Ring. Started reading Two Towers years ago but I barely remember it. Thus far I’ve been in the order of Silmarillion and LOTR series. May read Hobbit after that.

  • Tolkien is truly an inspiration to have created such a vast world with such a rich lore and history. I always look forward to each video.

  • My knowledgeable friend. I really don’t think anyone can be a true expert on Tolkien. But you do a fantastic job at it! Thanks for another great video!

  • Rant sequence: INITIATED

    I finished the Lord of the Rings about a month and a half ago.

    It was an incredibly emotional experience for me.

    An old friend made a completely self-produced (and rather melancholic) dungeon synth album that was inspired by LOTR/Tolkien, which I encourage you to give a listen if you ever intend on or are currently reading Tolkien:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKcFKFBT2mY&list=PLmca-HoKiShlhG9POpIPedRQsc5rlAJkI
    Seriously, this album on repeat while reading LOTR was an awesome mood-setter and complemented the atmosphere beautifully. It was also partially what made reading this book such an emotional experience.

    The Lord of the Rings was easily, easily, the greatest book I’d ever touched.
    Tolkien’s world is really such an unbelievably beautiful and special thing and I’m glad that I was able to cross paths with it.
    It does my heart good to know that there was a person like Tolkien who gave life to such a miraculous world that has touched so many people.

    I felt that I needed some time off between LOTR and the Silmarillion.
    From what I’ve seen, people make the Silmarillion seem like a real time commitment/textbook-type read, which has made it difficult for me to find the motivation to read it.
    Watching this video has given me some clarity and reignited the spark I needed to start reading again.
    Thank you!

    Rant sequence: TERMINATED

  • Wow I love your review. The Silmarillion is also one of my favorite books, it was also easier for me to read than LotR. I am now set on reading the entire History of Middle-Earth, been wanting to do it for years and now I have a little extra time during the pandemic since I’m working from home hehe Wish me luck!

  • Great list! My only change would be to put The Children of Hurin and then Unfinished Tales before The Silmarillion. The Children of Hurin is a great bridge between the style of Return of the King and The Silmarillion, which can otherwise be pretty jarring and loses a lot of readers. Putting it along with Unfinished Tales in that gap helps prepare you to really appreciate The Silmarillion for what it is.

  • Time-Table:

    Slipcase: 00:15 00:58
    Binding: 00:59 01:50
    Contents: 02:19 02:24
    Some of the art & sketches: 02:25 06:02
    Spine & sewn binding: 06:09 06:43
    Outro: 06:44 07:10

  • I started with the Hobbit and then read LOTRs for the first time in the mid 70s when I was in Jr. high, but I would start with the Silmarillion if I was reading them for the first time

  • The Hobbit movies are abysmal! The characters are hate..able. The Dwarves are terrible. Thorin is disgustingly rude! Elrond saves them and the Thorin curses him in Sindarin. Excuse me but what the hell?

    Everything is terrible!

  • The only change I would make in read order is to read the silmarillion first. I’m of the mind to read things in chronological order if that is possible, in this case chronological within the history of middle earth, not so much order of publication. As for the rest of your suggestions on order I believe there is no flaw in it. Thanks for all that you do on this channel.

  • Wagner rip-off. Three part opera (LOTR) with a prelude (Hobbit) about a powerful magic ring that is evil. The stories are basically the same thing but Tolkien would never admit the truth that for the most part it was based in it. There are unique narrative elements in Wagner that are NOT present in the Norse myths which Tolkien utilized, yet everyone either is ignorant of this or ignores it. It’s undeniable. No Wagner, no LOTR.

  • Thank you for reading order. I read the hobbit long time ago so I decided to read all of tolkiens work cause I have some free time lately. I thought I should read it in chronological order but thank you for stopping me.

  • Thanks for your suggested order! Currently rereading LotR (after reading Silmarillion and Hobbit)…haven’t had a chance to read any of the others yet.

  • Top notch video, as always!

    I was made aware of Mr. Day’s unreliable authorship while browsing through one of the reddit forums dedicated to The Professor, and have taken care since to stay away from his works, despite the great illustrations and neat packaging that they seem to possess.

    For someone building his Tolkien collection of books, I think it is extremely important to spend the money where it is deserved, especially if the book(s) don’t come cheap!

    I would be highly interested to know your views on the other guide, the Complete Tolkien Companion by J.E.A Tyler.

    Also, for a future video, if possible, please do a comparative analysis of some of the art books belonging to the Legendarium (Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator, The Art of the Hobbit, The Art of The Lord of The Rings, Middle Earth Traveller, The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit Sketchbook) so that anyone looking to buy their first art book, can pick 1 or 2 as a starting point (depending on their taste and the knowledge provided in the video). These books aren’t cheap, so can’t just splurge on most of them. A video will definitely help!

  • I am watching this for homework cuz i don’t wanna read the books and watch the all the movies to write about it for home work �� (No offence 2 Tolkien though i’m sure he is a amazing writer!)

  • While I do think this is a good reading order, I would also argue you could start out with The Hobbit and then move on to The Silmarillion. I enjoyed my second read through of The Lord of the Rings much more after I read the books on Middle-earth’s mythology and history

  • Maybe you should make a “how to read middle earth” video. For example, I take notes and talk to people about the world. I also look at pictures of middle earth before I go to bed.

  • What year were the editions you have printed? I have a box set with the 3 Lord Of The Rings books and they’re these exact editions, and I want the rest of the books to be matching when I buy them.

  • Well writtten script, competently delivered. Aweful, aweful comedic timing. Reading it from paper doomed his chances of any of the jokes (which were fine) ever landing

  • one thing being a Tolkien fan has done is it made me intrested in his academic work as well, like Monsters and Critics, his Beowulf translation and his actual research and theories on Languages, History and Mythology

  • You might have warned anybody who actually needed that information about the stylistic and tonal differences between The Hobbit and LOTR.

  • What does he mean that Tolkien’s work is not literature! Pop culture? Not at all. It is epic Prose in the tradition of Beowulf and the Norse Sagas

  • Nice work, i found it very informative and I personally can’t wait to read the silmarillion, i Will say though while i Havent read a lot of tolkien i have read the hobbit and I gotta say while i respect your opinion i have to say i prefer the movies, mainly for giving the dwarves more personality and giving Bard a more Prominent role in the story and setting him up rather than just being some guy Who shows up out of the blue, plus Benedict Cumberbatch is always a win, unpopular opinion i know but I do still see why People love the book

  • And, as far as Tom Bombadil, he has an actual identity in Middle-earth that is explored by Tom Shippey, and to which even Tolkien himself infers in “Letters” and “The History of Middle-earth.”

    Tom Bombadil is a character rather like Enlil and Enki, called a “Protoplast” in academic Mythology Studies (That means “First form” and refers to the first “Life” to arise in a myth). Tom Bombadil is the Protoplast for Middle-earth, and while Tolkien did not use that explicit word to describe him, his descriptions and the other stories he writes about Tom Bombadil make it clear that this is his role within Middle-earth. Thus he is an ‘Other’ within Middle-earth. He is a form of Life that is naturally emergent with the creation of Eä, yet which is neither a Child of Ilúvatar, nor an Ainur.

  • Beren and Lúthien,The Children of Húrin, and The Fall of Gondolin could be considered a trilogy and should be considered for a future movie trilogy.

  • There is a whole series by cristopher tolkien based on history of middle earth. It has twelve volumes:
    1 The book of lost tales part 1
    2 The book of lost tales part 2
    3 The lays of beleriand
    4 The shaping of middle earth
    5 The lost road and other writings
    6 The return of the shadow
    7 The treason of isengard
    8 The war of the ring
    9 Sauron defeated
    10 Morgoth’s ring
    11 The war of the jewels
    12 the peoples of middle earth

  • This is the order I would recommend really. I tried to read the sillmarillion it was exceedingly complex and unless you read Tolkien’s 4 most well known books first, you’re in for one helluva hangover after reading Tolkien’s first and last book

  • Personally, I’ve always found one of the major keys to understanding Tolkien is irony.

    There is none. I’ve never read a work of literature so utterly devoid of irony.

  • Tbh I would do unfinished tales before BEFORE Silmarillion because it is much closer to the story of LOTR.
    Also read the Complete History DEAD LAST. It is vast and daunting and only for the most experienced. Instead read his other worlds outside of ME I would say

  • Great video. It’s really nice to know I’m not the only one passionate about Tolkien. This community is so lovely and your videos are great! See you next week!

  • One could also argue that one should start with the Silmarillion, to learn how the world of Tolkien was created and from there read the Hobbit and LOTR, there’s really no recipe!

  • The first Tolkien book I ever read was The Silmarillion. To those who are wondering why I started there instead of reading The Hobbit and The LOTR trilogy first, is for a few reasons. The first is at the time of The original trilogy’s conclusion (Peter Jackson’s film trilogy) I wasn’t aware of The Hobbit’s existence until a few years later, and on top of that The Fellowship of the Ring video game put a bad taste in my mouth. Since I heard that game was based on the first book of the trilogy I felt that maybe those books weren’t for me. However many years later after discovering The Silmarillion, and learning how challenging it was to read, I wanted to say I read the hardest of Tolkien’s work and boy was it an indescribable experience. To learning the origins of Middle Earth, meeting Sauron’s master, and learning key events in the first age made me feel so much appreciation for the creative mind of Tolkien. The book will always hold a special place in my heart and I’m so glad it was my first book in his legendarium. I have yet to read The Hobbit, as well as TLOTR trilogy but I’m looking forward to it. Thank you for this video Men Of The West, Tolkien is smiling down upon you. ������

  • you are an amazing youtuber and I regret to see that you are not as active as you were before, I enjoy your middle earth tour videos and I can’t wait for you to do more, I also enjoyed your a middle earth traveler book video and I have it now, so thanks for that I guess lol

  • Worth every second. Reading Tolkien transformed my life in a way that nothing ever did. Because, as he said, it is not a simple fairy tale, its an experience. And Tolkien for sure poured himself into his work, a part of his soul, and his suffering and the hope and nostalgia, the innocence preserved in the hearts of the unknowing (the hobbits) by sacrifice of those 5 hobbits, the goodness people are still capable of, even after so much pain and heartache. Selflessness, duty, honour. And he put in a happy ending, which we all know thats the real escapist part of it, in real life, this happy ending hardly ever come.

  • I came into contact with Michael Drout by way of an Old English course I took through Signum University. He’s fanastic and I love his humour.

  • The Hobbit movies are abysmal! The characters are hate..able. The Dwarves are terrible. Thorin is disgustingly rude! Elrond saves them and the Thorin curses him in Sindarin. Excuse me but what the hell?

    Everything is terrible!

  • Man…What an order…Can’t wait to start!!! I have already Done…
    Thanks for your opinion Mellon…Until oh A Livestream…I really hope to make it…Marion Baggins Out Voting!!!
    P.s Please Make me Make it…Please!!! P.ps if I don’t, Until June Mellon!!!

  • Damn, i think the movies are awesome, so imagine now that I’m strarting with all Harper Collins collection (you should see my self made Sauron’s book marker just for The Sirmarillion, well actually all my book markers are self made topic allusive, including humanities, philosophy and sciences).

  • (Order from this video)
    1. The Hobbit
    2. The Lord of the Rings
    The Fellowship of the Ring
    The Two Towers
    The Return of the King
    3. The Silmarillion
    4. The Great Tales
    Beren and Luthien
    Children of Hurin
    The Fall of Gondolin
    5. Unfinished Tales
    6. History of Middle Earth
    The Book of Lost Tales, Part I
    The Book of Lost Tales, Part II
    The Lays of Beleriand
    The Shaping of Middle-earth
    The Lost Road and Other Writings
    The Return of the Shadow
    The Treason of Isengard
    The War of the Ring
    Sauron Defeated
    Morgoth’s Ring
    The War of the Jewels
    The Peoples of Middle-earth
    7. Letters of Tolkien
    8. Tom Bombadil
    Bilbo’s Last Words
    9. (Other books by individuals who have analyzed Tolkien’s work.)

    Thank you Yoystan for providing this content and making it easy and fun to dive into Tolkien’s world!

  • I suggest giving the Unabridged Sillmerilion a listen on Audible, the Narrator makes it sound so epic! The children of Hurin was my favorite, it reminded me of something out of GOT lol, its pretty messed up.

  • Also listen to Donald Swann’s musical settings of Tolkien’s songs Tolkien himself approved them.  My personal favourite is Namarie.

  • I used to be scared to read Lord of the Rings but ever since then I read all of the published Game of Thrones books (well, the main ones not the novellas) and I am hoping that it will be my next successful read-through. Starting with the Hobbit.:)

  • poor from reading reference / notes in delivering a presentation. This, in conjunction with an extremely apathetic audience, makes one feel for Dr Drout. The narrative is incredibly wide-ranging and unclear considering the title of the vid. However, the talk is incredibly deep wrt tolkien, and very informative.

    Well done sir

  • I for one have read Lord of the Rings at least 3 times. Once when I was 10, 15 and 25. Picking up new things about it every time I read it.

  • I can’t believe they give Merry sole credit for killing the Witch-king! He only wounds him, but Éowyn is the one to deliver the killing blow.

  • I kind of disagree with you regarding “canon”. Typical book/film canon isn’t quite like “religious canon” of old. Book/Film canon just means that while there IS room to fudge things there is still a underlying structure of characters, places, timeline, and events that are set in stone that you CAN’T alter without fundamentally altering the story.

    Same thing with Norse mythology. Some of Tolkien’s work is loosely based on Norse mythology, however you can’t replace half of Norse mythology with Tolkien’s work and still call it Norse mythology, because it wouldn’t be. Norse mythology HAS evolved over the centuries but NOT to the point where the Norse wouldn’t recognize it. That’s because certain people, things, and events ARE set in stone and they’ve never been changed (and more than likely never WILL be changed). That’s what book readers and film watchers would call “canon”.

    The word “canon” has itself evolved to mean more than the classic “religious dogma with hard rules” ideal. Canon can also just mean “upholding the known normal” or “upholding accepted principle” (like in written stories). The word “canon” itself isn’t quite as “hard core” as it used to be.

  • That was great to learn a bit more about LotR before the movies hit. I’m reading the books for the first time finally. I know I waited way too long. What a great look at the rebirth of modern fantasy thanks to Tolkien and his great skill and interest.

  • chuckling i think the mass news actually thinks you can be persuaded to see me as Quest:) it couldn’t get any more allegorical ��

  • My favourite LotR character is Eowyn. I have loved the name for years and while I wasn’t brave enough with my first daughter, it felt right this time around and we now have a baby girl named Eowyn….Winnie for short.

  • Wow I love that hard copy of lotr! And also the Hobbit! They’re gorgeous! I am due for a reread of lotr, and I need to read more by him. I’ve read lotr and the Hobbit, but I really want to read the samarillion!

  • Wow Tolkien was a homewrecker lol.
    I was obsessed with the movies when I was a kid. Finally managed to read the books after a couple of false starts when I was a bit too young for them, I guess.
    I want to have a “year of The Tolkien” and read everything he ever wrote.
    Nice editions! ��
    Mine is the bind up with the red cover. It’s very bendy actually lol
    I literally insta buy any book David Day makes on Middle Earth.

  • I started the Hobbit and find the writing style incredibly hard to digest and the story very dry and boring. I know that Tolkien style can be difficult to read if your used to modern fantasy but should I just skip the Hobbit and move on to the lord of the Rings or wait a few years till I’m more well read in the genre?

  • I have never read lotr because my mother was a controlling Christian no Harry potter or lotr because devil crap im 21 now and i realized I’m on my phone 8 hours a day I watched the movies behind my mom’s back when I was 10 now I want to get into this books cause i like the movies and also to take A break from my phone for abit

  • Prof. Drout’s description of mournful nostalgia, reminds me of the Portuguese word, saudade and the many laments associated with it in poetry and song. The universality of the human heart and its longings is impressive. Tolkien’s ability to put so much into his work is a blessing.

  • If you are new: check the description, I put some information there. I hope it helped some people out and you liked it. It was actually quite hard to make and I’m not 100% happy with it. Let me know what you think of it. Next week could be light on content.

    Playlists:
    My best lore videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvIF22mOujY&list=PLvqIed90tYZoTeR0HFEY9ir6X31aLnazo
    Film/Book differences series https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qe-4l74B8mw&list=PLvqIed90tYZoiZZ-mAGxp6NnUrdURe0Uq

    Mistakes:

  • Great list! My only change would be to put The Children of Hurin and then Unfinished Tales before The Silmarillion. The Children of Hurin is a great bridge between the style of Return of the King and The Silmarillion, which can otherwise be pretty jarring and loses a lot of readers. Putting it along with Unfinished Tales in that gap helps prepare you to really appreciate The Silmarillion for what it is.

  • one thing being a Tolkien fan has done is it made me intrested in his academic work as well, like Monsters and Critics, his Beowulf translation and his actual research and theories on Languages, History and Mythology

  • THE GREAT WAR WAS FOUGHT BECAUSE BANKERS WANTED TO REMAKE THE WORLD WITH THEM AS THE RULERS. BUT FIRST, THEY NEEDED TO BLOW IT UP, THEN OWN IT

  • For someone talking about communicative economy he needs an awful lot of time to make only a handful of points: ruins-nostalgia, LK-point of view, learning about world with character simultaneously, organic environment of learning, that’s it. I expected a lot more of this, for instance background information on major characters, explaining why we are drawn to certain characters and repulsed by others, the concept of the ring, the exact extent of Gandalf’s knowledge and power to intervene in the world vs. his “soft” power, the story of the elveshow they see themselves in the world and why their role has somehow “played out.” Really, with all due respect, this was not at all as insightful and revealing as I had expected.

  • The books are sooo much better than the movies. I enjoyed the movies but I feel they were extremely rushed and it was imposible to capture the real pace at which the story develops, and also failed to capture much of the feeling of Tolkien’s narrative. For example in the books it was always a big shock for the reader any time elven appeared. They felt truly magical, sometimes spectacularly wonderful such as the first time Arwen appears. In the movies this wasn’t conveyed properly. I think they could’ve done a much better job through a TV series.

  • Vielen Dank für dieses tolle Video! Die LotR Filme sind seit ihrem Erscheinen einfach wie “zuhause” für mich und ich habe sie unzählige male gesehen aber erst letzten Sommer habe ich begonnen, die Bücher zu lesen und mich wirklich mit der Welt zu beschäftigen. Dein Chanel hilft mir, die LotR Welt noch mehr zu verstehen, schätzen und zu lieben! Danke!

  • Vielen Dank für dieses tolle Video! Die LotR Filme sind seit ihrem Erscheinen einfach wie “zuhause” für mich und ich habe sie unzählige male gesehen aber erst letzten Sommer habe ich begonnen, die Bücher zu lesen und mich wirklich mit der Welt zu beschäftigen. Dein Chanel hilft mir, die LotR Welt noch mehr zu verstehen, schätzen und zu lieben! Danke!

  • If you want a totally comprehensive primer on the Simarillion (with some nice humor thrown in) go to https://www.tor.com/series/the-silmarillion-primer/
    Awesome stuff!

  • How would we want to read these in chronological order? That’s my main question I’ve read the hobbit and lord of the rings and grew up on the books and movies. I’ve always wanted to read the other books but never gotten around to it

    EDIT: I know you said about the letters what show chronological orders in your opinion but with ALL the books what would the best order be??

  • To be honest i find iT kinda hard to read the lord of the rings so i should begin with the hobbit then silmarillion then the main series then beren and luthien

  • So I’m curious-how does one measure the effectiveness of the LKC method? It’s praised here, yet it’s not at all rare. It’s used in J J Abrams’ recent Star Wars: The Force Awakens as a way to deliver the story to ‘catch people up’ on the state of the galaxy….yet that movie was little more than a pop culture roller coaster of sanitized fan service comprised of strung-together emotional leitmotifs crafted to pluck each appropriate heart string to qualify it as a major Hollywood film. In short, the LKC method was used but it didn’t save the film.

    Is it a combination of Tolkien’s methods that makes LOTR what it is? Is it simply the voice with which he wrote it? Was it a lucky strike? I feel like a lot of the analysis with broken references and such is nice, but these are things studied and implemented by many of today’s major storytellers….but why so often does it fall flat even when executed by the book?

  • I picked this book up today to hopefully get better at English because reading apparently helps with that, so im gonna go start reading this now, wish me luck:)

  • For those who don’t want to read Lord of the Rings, I recommend Phil Dragash’s audiobook soundscape. He does all the character voices, sound effects, and theme music. Very well done.

  • There is a 1977 The Hobbit movie made by Rankin-Bass, the company that made all those claymation Christmas movies. It is cute and dark, and I think it compliments The Hobbit as a children’s bedtime storybook quite well.

  • The movies weren’t out when I first read the books. I had to wait 30 years. I read them every year for many years. I thought the movies were fabulous! I did talk my kids into reading the books before watching the movies.

  • If you want a totally comprehensive primer on the Simarillion (with some nice humor thrown in) go to https://www.tor.com/series/the-silmarillion-primer/
    Awesome stuff!

  • It might be worth thinking how to introduce the books to a child. Aged about 8 I discovered “The Hobbit” in our school library. I loved it. It was either the first or second proper book, i.e. not a picture-book, I ever read (The other was “Biggles Buries a Hatchet”). Soon after my mother shyly showed me an odd volume of “The Two Towers”, saying it could be a bit scary, but I might like the chapter ‘Flotsam and Jetsam’. Never looked back! (The Silmarillion doesn’t do it for me though.) Endorse all your other recs.

  • I really appreciate this kind of video, especially from a youtuber that knows what they’re talking about.
    I had already asked previously and got a fantastic, in depth answer on what books to read first (so I knew The Hobbit was my next read!). But this video was typical ThePhilosophersGames quality so there was loads I wasn’t aware of and I really enjoyed it! I will recommend this to anyone wanting to start exploring middle earth in a heartbeat:)

  • I really appreciate this kind of video, especially from a youtuber that knows what they’re talking about.
    I had already asked previously and got a fantastic, in depth answer on what books to read first (so I knew The Hobbit was my next read!). But this video was typical ThePhilosophersGames quality so there was loads I wasn’t aware of and I really enjoyed it! I will recommend this to anyone wanting to start exploring middle earth in a heartbeat:)

  • Reading LotR without the appendices is like watching the movies in non-extended edition… There is something missing.

    Also the appendices are great preparation before starting the silmarillion or children of Hiring as they are written slightly different.

  • The Hobbit was one of the books my mom read to me when i was a kid, alongside Astrid Lindgren’s works and the Moomintrolls series by Tove Jansson:’) and later in elementary school we studied some chapters in the literature class (in translation though, because english isn’t my first language). Back then I didn’t know much (or at all) about the sequel, I heard the words “Lord of the Rings” but it was very vague in my memory, so I didn’t know for sure if it was legit a book, or if I just imagined it XD because when I was reading The Hobbit, i often noticed little references to things far beyond the scope of the story, like when the party found the swords, and it was mentioned that they were most likely made in Gondolin, it made me wonder, what place that Gondolin was, and whether or not we were going to visit it XD
    I remember seeing the first LotR movie in a theathre because it came out around my 12th birthday, and that’s where we went to celebrate XD it left an impression, although i didn’t understand all of the events, haha.
    I read the LotR books when I was an adult already, a uni student, and stuck at home alone for the christmas holidays. I read the whole thing in 2 days (not leaving much time for sleep, lol), and then went straight ti Silmarillion. As a linguist myself, i can say it’s a must read for anyone who studies languages, and especially the English language!

    i read through the comments and saw mentions of other adaptations of the works (i remember seeing some of those). here’s an idea/question would you be interested in making a video about the alternative adaptations of Tolkien’s universe? that could be an interesting topic!

  • New subscriber here, not new to Tolkien, but I have loads to learn. I read The Hobbit and then The Lord of the Rings 30 years ago. The film did not disappoint. I didn’t like The Hobbit films at first, but now I do, despite its flaws. The extended DVD sets of both film series are highly recommended. I look forward to checking out more of your videos thank you!

  • It always amazes me how big of a world Tolkien created for “only” four (or seven) books. I’m curious: Did he (to our knowledge) ever planned to write “real” new books? Like a new trilogy or something?

  • My family made a mistake with me years ago when I was about 9 and they bought me Unfinished Tales I believe. It was the wrong book to introduce a very young child and I remember it being so bad in my mind so unreadable and none of it made no sense. And it spoiled me on any of these books for year’s. Then the movies came out and I got interested in trying to read the books but I still have that bad taste in my mouth. First impressions truly make or break thing’s. Maybe listening to them on audio would be better for me.

  • I did read the hobbit, but I was an adamant harry potter kid when the lotr trilogy came out.

    I binged the extended trilogy in college (precious free time man) and was thoroughly enchanted,so I started reading the literature after that and was very much mind-blown. Never looked back.

  • That is a far too simplistic reading of the Hobbit there is a lot going on there and it sets up LOTR as Bilbo is the Ring Finder. ��But well done to you for recommending Tolkien

  • There is a 1977 The Hobbit movie made by Rankin-Bass, the company that made all those claymation Christmas movies. It is cute and dark, and I think it compliments The Hobbit as a children’s bedtime storybook quite well.

  • The Hobbit was the book that introduced me to this beautifully world and I hope that everyone who read some of Tolkiens book’s is gonna fall in love in it as I did.

  • Why, immensely thanks for this video! Now I have a proper and valid proof that I am not alone regarding David Day’s inproper interpretation of Tolkien’s work, without bright boundaries between his own imagination and what really was professor’s ideas and visions.

  • I asked my high schooler son what books were popular on campus, ones the kids were reading just for fun, not assigned. We had The Hobbit and The Once and Future King. He looked at me like I had just sprouted a second head.��‍♀️

  • i am starting now reading the books with the hobbit. 3/4 through the book and i think it’s an excellent starting point for younger readers. after reading the book the movies have become nearly unwatchable like it happened for me with the first harry potter movie:( i fear reading the lord of the rings books for what they can do to the movies for me. it just feels like i’m watching a speedrun of the book. yes i am a new reader. haven’t read much before so i guess i have to still adapt to this but it’s honestly hard!

  • Loved this and needed it. I’m reading the Silmarillion now and it’s a bit overwhelming. So I’m going to follow this order. Still gonna keep readinh the silmarillion tho. I love it.

  • You should read Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth by John Garth. It covers much of the details of the Tolkien Movie about his time in WWI when he lived in my great great grandfather’s cottage.

  • my partner bought me the lord of the rings for christmas its the special edition which is beautiful big brown book with amazing illustrations and a red ribbon as a page finder.Anyhoo she moaned to my mother that she would never ever b uy me a book again,As she did not see me for the rest of Chriatmas.lol i read it every two years in the winter.My favorite but love his the three great tales as well.Hobbit is delightful and how we find our greatest treasure in friends x

  • You should read Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth by John Garth. It covers much of the details of the Tolkien Movie about his time in WWI when he lived in my great great grandfather’s cottage.

  • I’m reading The Hobbit now and am finding that even though it’s a children’s book technically, I overthink it and turn it into such a complex story that I find myself worried about not understanding every nuance. Or maybe I just have ADD or something. Haha

  • I haven’t read any of these except The Hobbit, so my goodreads tbr has been greatly increased. Not to seem like a creepy internet stranger, I noticed when I added “The Master of Middle Earth”, that you have listed it as already read and gave it 3 stars in 2011. It looks like you forgot you’ve already read that one:)

  • Start with the The Hobbit as a warm up for the introduction to Middle Earth. Then level up to Lord of the Rings before reaching The Silmarillion.

  • poor from reading reference / notes in delivering a presentation. This, in conjunction with an extremely apathetic audience, makes one feel for Dr Drout. The narrative is incredibly wide-ranging and unclear considering the title of the vid. However, the talk is incredibly deep wrt tolkien, and very informative.

    Well done sir

  • If you enjoy this brilliant man check out Rings, Swords and Monsters. A series of excellent lectures on Fantasy lit. Also check Mythmoot. All on Youtube. Enjoy.

  • I see a possible parallel between the Hobbits’ journey to Mordor and Tolkiens’ boyhood move from the country to the polluted city.

  • Thank you so much for this video!! I’m into his books right now. I love to visit Middle earth in books. ❤ May I ask where you bought your Tolkien books?

  • I love your enthusiasm and your commentary!
    Speaking as an older person, I commend your choices!
    I’ve got later impressions of LOTR (1st and second editions)
    All of the History of Middle Earth (as first published)
    In fact. pretty much everything Tolkien, or his son Christopher Tolkien published.
    They take up a lot of space in my office!
    Also about 15 books owned by his son, Michael. All inscribed in similar manner to JRRT’s symbolic style.
    It’s great to see a young generation still appreciates the work of this Great Man.
    Thank you for posting.
    Very Best Wishes to you!

  • Read The Lost Road (vol IV of the History of Middle Earth) and you will see that all these features are there explicit. It’s a strange book, perhaps the strangest in Tolkien’s morphology, but considering it was written just before he started writing the lord of the rings it contains his vision, his Weltanschauung that led him to write eventually his masterpiece.

  • The Lord of the Rings series (LoTR) is a shitty tale. Nothing much happens in anywhere in the book. That idiot Gandalf, foolish Frodo, their companions are just wandering from one point to other point. So many plans get cancelled. Also the ring is too much over-hyped as no one knows what it actually does or at least there is no mention of any good episode about its magical powers.

    The books are too verbose. Too less of action and higher percentage of the book is filled with the description of nature, trees, mountains, hills and people.

    This series is utter nonsense.

    Tolkein has made fool of many readers. And he has been successful in his evil endeavour.

  • The Fall of Gondolin was absolutely horrible, and not worth the read or the money. However, The children of Húrin was an amazing story! I love almost all of Tolkien’s work!

  • Thanks for the video! Today I got the urge to read another of Tolkien’s books (already read The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings and Silmarillion) and your video helped me to figure out which book I want to read next (just ordered The Unfinished Tales)

  • I personally prefer exactly that way, yet, not knowing where to start from, when I started reading the books a few years ago, I started with The Silmarillion… After some time I regreted it.

  • Question. In the appendices I understand the footnotes referencing the Hobbit, and Lotr I II and III. What about when the footnote references p and pp? What book are they referring to? Some are page numbers higher than any of the 4 main books.

  • I’m so glad you’re stressing the importance of the appendices, there is so much in there that fleshes out the stories that it’s crazy to miss them. And the Letters of Father Christmas is an adorable little book.

  • My dead read The Hobbit to me as a kid (didn’t remember much about it afterward), I read LotR trilogy later, followed by The Silmarillion, which was a real mind-blower and still a book I come back to from time to time. Eventually circled back around to The Hobbit, and yeah, when you have all that knowledge of Middle Earth swimming around in your head it’s kinda funny to notice all the clues that this was a story that got stitched into the Legendarium rather than being made for it originally, lol. Still a great story though, and the most approachable book for newcomers.

  • I love how interestingly you talk about it! And I also love that you find Silmarillion his most important work,just imagining what it could have been were he able to finish it…nonetheless I consider it the most insteresting piece of Fiction ever. It is the most important book for myself.
    I have not heard you mention the History of Middle Earth. You may have already read it, since it is quite an older video now. If you have not I recommend it even though I have not read it myself yet as I do not own the books, except the 12th one. It is basically full of additional and early material from Silmarillion, Hobbit and LOTR I think. There are some early texts and whatnot too. I think that if you loved Silmarillion,this is a way to go as it will give you even more information nd background of the work.

  • Hey everyone, I hope you all enjoyed this video! I would also like to recommend taking a look at A Tolkien Compass and The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion (as well as other reading guides) after reading the works of Tolkien’s legendarium for more information about our favorite author’s writings! Thanks

  • Question. In the appendices I understand the footnotes referencing the Hobbit, and Lotr I II and III. What about when the footnote references p and pp? What book are they referring to? Some are page numbers higher than any of the 4 main books.

  • Also, if you by any means can get it, you should read Kalevala by Elias Lonrot. A lot of the stories from Silmarillion, like Turin Turambar are based on it

  • I’m not a philologist, but even I know that Tolkien was the person that put the words precisely where they should be because languages were his speciality, and he was truly thorough when creating his world and its history peoples, languages etc. This is what happens to people when no one reads them fairy tales of different peoples and cultures when they are kids, and they don’t read books of different writers from different nations and historical backgrounds they get narrow-minded and don’t understand the usage of old fashioned words, archaisms and characteristics of protagonists and antagonists of the stories. It was nice listening to this lecture, but I don’t need explanations of Tolkien’s motivation or anything like that to enjoy his works… Nostalgia yeah, may not be popular, but anyone who has felt deep nostalgia and longing for what has been and is gone, for the passing of time and seeing birds leave to go to the south in autumn anyone will understand the feeling Tolkien has weaved into his writings…

  • Who knows “albonin” a story from Tolkien (maybe himself) as a child in a dialog with s.o. in which elfs are first named (Alb, alf elf, elb?)

  • Thanks for the video. Admittedly I’ve been using David Day’s maps to set up games and build maps in Age of Empires on PC. I’ll definitely go with Tolkien’s original maps going forward.:-)

  • Prof. Drout’s description of mournful nostalgia, reminds me of the Portuguese word, saudade and the many laments associated with it in poetry and song. The universality of the human heart and its longings is impressive. Tolkien’s ability to put so much into his work is a blessing.

  • I completely disagree with an almost immediate assertion, that LotR is “pop culture and not literature.” As if being one precludes the other. Many, many great novelists were popular in their culture. Pop culture is a purely modern term, and the fact that millions of people love LotR in no way means it is not literature. It is not only literature, but one of the great literary classics.

  • I was disappointed to hear you say the movies weren’t good. I am a fan if Tolkien ‘s books AND love the movies. The script was kept as close as possible to the novels which is RARE. Yes there were differences and things left out but I have NEVER seen a movie hold so close to the book before. That being said, watching the movies after reading the books, helped me straighten out not just geographical confusions I had, but also character haziness. One long character description at the beginning of meeting a new person, doesn’t always remain crystal clear through the length of 3 large novels. The movies helped solidify the images for the next reading. Who am I kidding, I’ve read AND watched the movies numerous times and each time discovering something new I had missed each time.
    I don’t usually comment on posts, but I couldn’t help myself when you expressed displeasure in what I consider a very difficult and commendable job at keeping the movies so close to the books. Should you want a HORRIBLE example of that, watch Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy. With the teaspoon of the book they took the movie from, they managed to go off the rails and never find them again not even 10 minutes in. I waited SO LONG for that movie, but walked out 20 minutes in. The only reason I ever watched the whole was because my husband begged. I still could barely make it.

    Sorry for the long rant but I just think that you are not seeing the biggest benefit to not just readers for some clarifying points, but the publicity it brought the books. If not for the movies, I doubt that over half the people that have read them since, would’ve taken the time to read them all. That would’ve been their loss too.

  • If you enjoy this brilliant man check out Rings, Swords and Monsters. A series of excellent lectures on Fantasy lit. Also check Mythmoot. All on Youtube. Enjoy.

  • Damn, i think the movies are awesome, so imagine now that I’m strarting with all Harper Collins collection (you should see my self made Sauron’s book marker just for The Sirmarillion, well actually all my book markers are self made topic allusive, including humanities, philosophy and sciences).

  • Don’t get me wrong I absolutely luv this documentary but I’m finding myself cringing at every mispronunciation of names, towns, lands, etc. But hey, at least their trying! Lol ��������������‍♂️������‍♂️����������‍♀️������⚔��������������

  • Wow… really great video. I have been thinking of trying Tolkien’s work from a long time but I kept on delaying it for some reason. Not anymore though. I will be buying The Hobbit book very soon. I guess it’s never too late to read ��

  • My 2020 resolution is reading all 3 LOTR Books. I hope I can get through it all cuz there are A lot of characters ect… that were not in the movies

  • my partner bought me the lord of the rings for christmas its the special edition which is beautiful big brown book with amazing illustrations and a red ribbon as a page finder.Anyhoo she moaned to my mother that she would never ever b uy me a book again,As she did not see me for the rest of Chriatmas.lol i read it every two years in the winter.My favorite but love his the three great tales as well.Hobbit is delightful and how we find our greatest treasure in friends x

  • I had to smile when I saw you hold up your copy of the Silmarillion with all the bookmarks sticking out of the side.

    @ 7:34 “The most complete version of the narn.”:D Only people who have read it already will have caught what you said.

  • I love Tolkien’s style of prose, the poetry of his descriptions really matches the mythicality of the story, it reminds me of the epic poets like Virgil, Dante, homer at points.

    I’m actually not a fan of how bare-boned the prose of modern fantasy has become, the name of the wind and Earthsea are the only ones I’ve found that value prose and make it beautiful.

  • Have you read the Book of Lost Tales (I and II)? The story of Tinuviel is charming. It’s the ancestor of Beren and Luthien, but reads more like a fairy tale. Sauron appears as Tevildo, Lord of the Cats.

    I’m surprised that you found LotR dense but not the Silmarillion:-)

    I read LotR out loud to my kids when they were 5 and 9. They begged me to skip the Council of Elrond so I did skip ahead there a bit.:-D

  • Just got The Hobbit and L.O.T.R books and when they get here (delayed delivery due to COVID-19����) i will get into them after i finish IT by Stephen King…Just got into reading and i love it��Great video and thanks for talking about these books��������✌��

  • Hi, can you tell me about the height of this paperback version of ‘ The Silmarillion’? I was going to buy it I i don’t know whether it will fit it in my book shelf or not

  • I did read the hobbit, but I was an adamant harry potter kid when the lotr trilogy came out.

    I binged the extended trilogy in college (precious free time man) and was thoroughly enchanted,so I started reading the literature after that and was very much mind-blown. Never looked back.

  • ‘lord of the rings’ is written as though the hobbits recorded it. the stylist is meant to be hobbitish. that transforms it from a good book to a work of genius

  • No..elronds elf friends is fucking ridiculous. They might be giants is drawn from a masterpiece of literature..not a book about munchkins.

  • Didn’t know of the 12-volume history of Middle-earth. Will look into that. I first read “Riddles in the Dark” in sixth grade in April 1975 as that chapter was a story in our school reading series. I didn’t know it was from a novel called The Hobbit until I overheard a classmate talking about someone having to destroy a ring in the Cracks of Doom. I was hooked then, but when we went to the library to check out the book, I had to get on a waiting list as it was very popular then. So he suggested I read LOTR first and I loved it. I finally got a call from the public library that August saying The Hobbit was in, and I raced down and checked it out and read it in a lawn chair in my backyard on a beautiful sunny day. I was in hobbit Heaven! Read The Silmarillion after that and then Carpenter’s Tolkien biography. Thanks for another great video!

  • The Lord of the Rings series (LoTR) is a shitty tale. Nothing much happens in anywhere in the book. That idiot Gandalf, foolish Frodo, their companions are just wandering from one point to other point. So many plans get cancelled. Also the ring is too much over-hyped as no one knows what it actually does or at least there is no mention of any good episode about its magical powers.

    The books are too verbose. Too less of action and higher percentage of the book is filled with the description of nature, trees, mountains, hills and people.

    This series is utter nonsense.

    Tolkein has made fool of many readers. And he has been successful in his evil endeavour.

  • Just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading The Fellowship of the Ring, and the reason why I dared to read it was because of you, so thanks for that. I used to think that it was too long and dense, and so that I shouldn’t even try to read it (I had tried reading The Hobbit when I was twelve and I just couldn’t). Seeing how passionate you were about it made me want to give Tolkien another go, now I’m searching for the cheapest place to buy The Two Towers. Thank you very much.

  • At first I struggled and didn’t understand the first 100 pages of the silmarilion, I scrapped that, I then restarted and concentrated on what I was reading creating a vivid world in my mind using my mind I understood the book and as each page went on I got addicted and the pictures that depicted were truly beautiful. I then read children of hurin in a couple days, then I read the beautiful sad story of the fall of gondolin, which I wish was explored more by the man himself. I wish there was more, I really do.

  • Pretty much agree. I‘d probably read The Children of Hurín before the other two great tales, because it is basically a finished text, whereas the other two are much more fragmented and even feature different versions (such as a poetic and a prose version) of the text.

  • I strongly believe that Sam’s simple line “Well, I’m back” fully encapsulates everything that is great about LotR, and here’s Dr. Drout giving an hour-long presentation to make that point.

  • I completely disagree with an almost immediate assertion, that LotR is “pop culture and not literature.” As if being one precludes the other. Many, many great novelists were popular in their culture. Pop culture is a purely modern term, and the fact that millions of people love LotR in no way means it is not literature. It is not only literature, but one of the great literary classics.

  • Worth every second. Reading Tolkien transformed my life in a way that nothing ever did. Because, as he said, it is not a simple fairy tale, its an experience. And Tolkien for sure poured himself into his work, a part of his soul, and his suffering and the hope and nostalgia, the innocence preserved in the hearts of the unknowing (the hobbits) by sacrifice of those 5 hobbits, the goodness people are still capable of, even after so much pain and heartache. Selflessness, duty, honour. And he put in a happy ending, which we all know thats the real escapist part of it, in real life, this happy ending hardly ever come.

  • Please do a whole lecture on the different speech styles. I was very interested to see that there is a whole graph worked out.

    In my view the different speech modes is one of the most important aspects of LOTR. It seems to get too little attention.

    I see Sam Gamgee taken from his garden as Joe Gargery taken from his smithy and dropped in the middle of the Bible and The Iliad. The whole contrast between a working class everyman and posh ancient folk is, I believe, the meat and potatoes of the LOTR.

  • This video is a class on both Tolkien, and how to use horrible timing with half decent jokes, and how to butcher the german language.

  • I love Tolkien’s style of prose, the poetry of his descriptions really matches the mythicality of the story, it reminds me of the epic poets like Virgil, Dante, homer at points.

    I’m actually not a fan of how bare-boned the prose of modern fantasy has become, the name of the wind and Earthsea are the only ones I’ve found that value prose and make it beautiful.

  • Wow I love your review. The Silmarillion is also one of my favorite books, it was also easier for me to read than LotR. I am now set on reading the entire History of Middle-Earth, been wanting to do it for years and now I have a little extra time during the pandemic since I’m working from home hehe Wish me luck!

  • No..elronds elf friends is fucking ridiculous. They might be giants is drawn from a masterpiece of literature..not a book about munchkins.

  • I came into contact with Michael Drout by way of an Old English course I took through Signum University. He’s fanastic and I love his humour.

  • I nearly passed over this and I’m glad I didn’t.

    I read LotR in the 70’s as a boy and it deeply impacted me. Unbeknown to me at the time Tolkien lived where I was born and holidayed at his aunts house and played in the hills and fields where I lived from age 3. The sense of place still stays with me. Now I can see (imagine?)the impact the area had on Tolkien….the woodland, ancient oaks, streams, lakes. The medieval timbered pubs with the old men, barmaids, locally brewed beers and ciders. The accents and appearance of rural Worcestershire folk. The distant hills of Wales, Shropshire.

    http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/1065-Bag-End-A-Very-English-Place.php

    It’s worth a visit.

  • Anybody ever read the Sword of Shannarah series by Terry Brooks? I always found similarities between the two. Shannarah was still a great series, but lost intersted after about the 6th book lol
    Too bad MTV destroyed the Shannara Chronicles show

  • The Cats of Queen Beruthiel were explained in Unfinished Tales. Queen Beruthiel was the wife of Tarannon Falastur, 12th king of Gondor. She was a witch, who trained her ten cats to act as her spies. Her husband eventually banished her from his kingdom and she was last seen in a boat, sailing south, accompanied only by her cats.

  • Honestly, somehow this is my favorite video of yours and I can’t say why. Feels like that is unfair, given that your other (btw really awesome!) videos took way more preparation and work.

  • Fav book: Silmarillion. Fav book re JRRT: Road to Middle-Earth/Shippey. Fav character: Idril. If I have to choose a human fav: Haleth.

  • Start with the The Hobbit as a warm up for the introduction to Middle Earth. Then level up to Lord of the Rings before reaching The Silmarillion.

  • I read them all until the History of Middle-Earth (HOME); but started with LOTR before the Hobbit, and read them each three times. Have recently ordered HOME much thanks to @themenofthewest and the upcoming LOTR tv-series in 2021 that have sparked my renewed interest to delve deeper into the fantastic works of Tolkien!:)

  • I remember when I was 12 and first got into Lord of the Rings in 2001, I honestly thought at first that it was a 6-book series and I thought the order was Fellowship of the Ring, Two Towers, Return of the King, I drew a blank for 4, and 5, and I thought The Hobbit was the 6th and final book. If you go by the PJ movies in order of their release dates, the 6th and final film of his in Middle-earth was of The Hobbit, so I was off by 13 years and two different mediums.

  • I disagree. That’s it. That’s my comment. Kidding a part it just reminded of how much I still have to read. And I’m very happy about it. I think I don’t really need to read anything else, just Tolkien books.

  • Unfortunately, when a writer once demonstrates a willingness to allow their own views to overwrite those of the author being commented upon, they utterly destroy their reputation. It’s like someone caught cheating at cards; their reputation is gone, and people don’t want to play with them anymore.

  • I actually read LotR first in my mid teens, then the Silmarillion before speed reading The Hobbit (which I found rather dull really).

  • I watched this just after the 80th anniversary of the publishing of “The Hobbit”. Make sure you have the hour to commit to this program. It is very insightful and added a new level of my understanding of the Sage of Middle Earth.

  • I’ve read the books about 5 times,but listened to the audiobooks read by the great Rob Inglis about 15 times,he reads it perfectly

  • So proud to say I’ve read all the books; The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, LOTR trilogy, and quite a bit of The Book Of Lost Tales. I encountered them at just the right time in life, when I had time to read unlike today lol. Such a wonderful journey. Oh, Children of Hurin is pretty good too.

  • very easy. Tolkien was motivated by love. not money or fame or pursuit of intellectual or artistic excellence. his work has a soul and reader with a soul can feel it.

  • A Tolkien Bestiarium is a nice illustrated book for beginners an pros.
    I started reading the Hobbit, The lord of the ring, Silmarillion, Lost tales etc. in my early teens more than 40 years ago. I’m a big Tolkien fan since that time. I love good fantasy an SF stories/books. Dune series is another favorite.

  • I’d posted a comment here long time ago said that I’ve really needed a script of his lecture in English, so I can translate it into my mother tongue and then share this wonderful lecture among our fandom. But now I cannot see that comment anywhere.:( There was a generous guy said that he can make a transcription for me. But because that comment was vanished, I’ve lost contact with him. Today, I post this comment again, hope to regain contact with that guy, or seek out another help from you who can understand every words of this lecture. I really want to translate this, but my listening skills are not good enough to understand the entire lecture in details. Please help me!

  • Actually, i feel that Dr Drout is pitching way above the cognitive ability of the audience. He deserves much more than the feedback he gets back from his audience not even close to if he had pitched a responsive audience try Oxbridge please. Indeed this lecture would’ve been best pitched to Prof Tolkien’s college…

  • My dad bought me the books in 1985 when I was 10. I was consumed for 2 weeks while a devoured the stories. I have read them over so many times I’ve lost count. You do a phenomenal job. You should be very proud. Keep on.

  • The only change I would make in read order is to read the silmarillion first. I’m of the mind to read things in chronological order if that is possible, in this case chronological within the history of middle earth, not so much order of publication. As for the rest of your suggestions on order I believe there is no flaw in it. Thanks for all that you do on this channel.

  • These books are one of the best stories of all time. I felt the movies changes or added things that didn’t need to be and was not happy with them. Though I did like the earlier movie that was more cartoon but did a much better job of being more in tune with the books.
    He invented a new world and made it real. A mark of a great writer. I lost count of how many times I’ve read them over the years but I never got tired of reading them

  • Personally, I’ve always found one of the major keys to understanding Tolkien is irony.

    There is none. I’ve never read a work of literature so utterly devoid of irony.

  • Tolkien is truly an inspiration to have created such a vast world with such a rich lore and history. I always look forward to each video.

  • Man, you’ve save my money. I had my finger ready to pay for David Day’s collection, but i looked for some reference and then you appear. Thanks you

  • I feel like I’m the only person on earth who likes the hobbit movies lol. It probably helps that I didn’t really have any expectations going in but I don’t get why they’re so slated.

  • So glad I saw this. I always loved the films and wanted to delve back into the books despite their longevity. Having the chronological order gives me a new perspective on the whole outline of Tolkien’s world.

  • And, as far as Tom Bombadil, he has an actual identity in Middle-earth that is explored by Tom Shippey, and to which even Tolkien himself infers in “Letters” and “The History of Middle-earth.”

    Tom Bombadil is a character rather like Enlil and Enki, called a “Protoplast” in academic Mythology Studies (That means “First form” and refers to the first “Life” to arise in a myth). Tom Bombadil is the Protoplast for Middle-earth, and while Tolkien did not use that explicit word to describe him, his descriptions and the other stories he writes about Tom Bombadil make it clear that this is his role within Middle-earth. Thus he is an ‘Other’ within Middle-earth. He is a form of Life that is naturally emergent with the creation of Eä, yet which is neither a Child of Ilúvatar, nor an Ainur.

  • And, as far as Tom Bombadil, he has an actual identity in Middle-earth that is explored by Tom Shippey, and to which even Tolkien himself infers in “Letters” and “The History of Middle-earth.”

    Tom Bombadil is a character rather like Enlil and Enki, called a “Protoplast” in academic Mythology Studies (That means “First form” and refers to the first “Life” to arise in a myth). Tom Bombadil is the Protoplast for Middle-earth, and while Tolkien did not use that explicit word to describe him, his descriptions and the other stories he writes about Tom Bombadil make it clear that this is his role within Middle-earth. Thus he is an ‘Other’ within Middle-earth. He is a form of Life that is naturally emergent with the creation of Eä, yet which is neither a Child of Ilúvatar, nor an Ainur.

  • Why, immensely thanks for this video! Now I have a proper and valid proof that I am not alone regarding David Day’s inproper interpretation of Tolkien’s work, without bright boundaries between his own imagination and what really was professor’s ideas and visions.

  • Not sure what he is driving at? And I do not really care as this is uninteresting mostly opinionated nothing to learn or to even try to follow. Could not finish or I did not want to.

  • I was wanting to buy the Hobbit Companion by David Day and now I am having second thoughts about that. What do you think. Would it be a wasted purchase even if the pictures are good?

  • Just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading The Fellowship of the Ring, and the reason why I dared to read it was because of you, so thanks for that. I used to think that it was too long and dense, and so that I shouldn’t even try to read it (I had tried reading The Hobbit when I was twelve and I just couldn’t). Seeing how passionate you were about it made me want to give Tolkien another go, now I’m searching for the cheapest place to buy The Two Towers. Thank you very much.

  • Wow… really great video. I have been thinking of trying Tolkien’s work from a long time but I kept on delaying it for some reason. Not anymore though. I will be buying The Hobbit book very soon. I guess it’s never too late to read ��

  • I started the Hobbit and find the writing style incredibly hard to digest and the story very dry and boring. I know that Tolkien style can be difficult to read if your used to modern fantasy but should I just skip the Hobbit and move on to the lord of the Rings or wait a few years till I’m more well read in the genre?

  • I’ve read the books about 5 times,but listened to the audiobooks read by the great Rob Inglis about 15 times,he reads it perfectly

  • Actually the Silmarillion was finished in 1930 before the hobbit but then, because it was the begining of everything he had to adapt and rewrite the silmarillion to adapt it to the hobbit and after that to the lotr but he died before he could adapt it to the lotr. So it was finished even before the hobbit. Most people don’t know this.

  • Unfortunately, when a writer once demonstrates a willingness to allow their own views to overwrite those of the author being commented upon, they utterly destroy their reputation. It’s like someone caught cheating at cards; their reputation is gone, and people don’t want to play with them anymore.

  • What’s the name of the Von Ziggler song?? It’s escaping me at the moment:/ (I also e-mailed you, feel free to respond however you wish. Making a ‘Pontus Adrian Von Ziggler Tolkien book playlist haha)

  • I can’t believe they give Merry sole credit for killing the Witch-king! He only wounds him, but Éowyn is the one to deliver the killing blow.

  • Really interesting video! Gonna use it whenever someone asks me why I wouldn’t necessarily recommend his works.
    Even though I admit to falling victim to the pretty new editions…haha.

  • mostly autumn! first heard of them in this doc, and since them, they became one of my favourite bands. very nice and nostalgic to watch it again.

  • My family made a mistake with me years ago when I was about 9 and they bought me Unfinished Tales I believe. It was the wrong book to introduce a very young child and I remember it being so bad in my mind so unreadable and none of it made no sense. And it spoiled me on any of these books for year’s. Then the movies came out and I got interested in trying to read the books but I still have that bad taste in my mouth. First impressions truly make or break thing’s. Maybe listening to them on audio would be better for me.

  • That is a far too simplistic reading of the Hobbit there is a lot going on there and it sets up LOTR as Bilbo is the Ring Finder. ��But well done to you for recommending Tolkien

  • I disagree. That’s it. That’s my comment. Kidding a part it just reminded of how much I still have to read. And I’m very happy about it. I think I don’t really need to read anything else, just Tolkien books.

  • About a month ago, I moved out of my parent’s house to go to college. And since I had a long bus journey ahead of me, and wanted to start a new chapter in many possible ways, I decided to look for a new book (series) to pour my soul into and devour. So, I needed something excellent. I wanted a new Harry Potter, something I didn’t have since… well, Harry Potter. And for those reasons, I picked up the first part of LOTR and went on my way into the world.
    I struggled through the prologue. But already within the first few pages of actual story, I noticed that… the writing was kind of charming. It was witty and slow paced and very enjoyable. So I continued. And at some point, I’m not sure how it happened, I realized that, holy shit, this was it. This was actually all I had hoped for and more, this really was my next Harry Potter, my next world to helplessly fall in love with and my next fandom to spend hours upon hours on.

    I finished the books last week, and I cried so fucking much, but it was good crying. Like, I’ll never get to discover it all for the first time again, but I WILL read it again, and again and again, and there are still three absolutely phenomenal movies to watch and mountains of fanfiction to read and dumb memes to laugh at and now all of this is my life.
    I never intended to link the start of my own big journey into life so inseparably with the journey of the fellowship, but I did and it fits in a kind of poetic way that I really like ( even though I really hope I’m not headed to Mordor lol).

    Tolkien was just as incredible as everyone says he was. The books hold up after like 70 years, the movies hold up after almost 20 years, and I firmly believe both will continue to do so.

    (Also I got a new OTP out of it and like, that’s more than I could have ever hoped for. Frodo and Sam, it’s so perfect that it hurts…)

  • I would add the “Atlas of Middle Earth”, by Karen Wynn Fonstad. It covers every story in the three main books. It’s fantastic!!!

  • Pretty much agree. I‘d probably read The Children of Hurín before the other two great tales, because it is basically a finished text, whereas the other two are much more fragmented and even feature different versions (such as a poetic and a prose version) of the text.

  • Just finished reading the Hobbit yesterday for the first time, amazing book. At the moment I have only read the prologue of The Fellowship of The Ring and at any moment will begin to read the book. Luckily I have a friend who has read most of the lotr books so I usually tell him when I am for example half way through the book. It motivates me a lot because he always tells me how good the books are, asks me what part was my favorite, etc, etc. Very excited!!!!!!!

  • I remember when I was 12 and first got into Lord of the Rings in 2001, I honestly thought at first that it was a 6-book series and I thought the order was Fellowship of the Ring, Two Towers, Return of the King, I drew a blank for 4, and 5, and I thought The Hobbit was the 6th and final book. If you go by the PJ movies in order of their release dates, the 6th and final film of his in Middle-earth was of The Hobbit, so I was off by 13 years and two different mediums.

  • Neat, I didn’t realize this was brand-new when I clicked on it. I am reading the Fall of Gondolin, and with the exception of having done Hobbit after Return of the King, I have read the books so far in your suggested order.:-) I do agree with the order (being in the middle of it as I am).

  • My dead read The Hobbit to me as a kid (didn’t remember much about it afterward), I read LotR trilogy later, followed by The Silmarillion, which was a real mind-blower and still a book I come back to from time to time. Eventually circled back around to The Hobbit, and yeah, when you have all that knowledge of Middle Earth swimming around in your head it’s kinda funny to notice all the clues that this was a story that got stitched into the Legendarium rather than being made for it originally, lol. Still a great story though, and the most approachable book for newcomers.

  • I have literally been looking for this for 2 years. This just came up in my suggested at the perfect time because I just started a reread and have only read the main 4

  • P.s I love this YouTube page! Sorry I dont know how to spell your name or I would mention you by name so sorry lol. But great page my friend!

  • Who knows “albonin” a story from Tolkien (maybe himself) as a child in a dialog with s.o. in which elfs are first named (Alb, alf elf, elb?)

  • While I do think this is a good reading order, I would also argue you could start out with The Hobbit and then move on to The Silmarillion. I enjoyed my second read through of The Lord of the Rings much more after I read the books on Middle-earth’s mythology and history

  • Thanks for your suggested order! Currently rereading LotR (after reading Silmarillion and Hobbit)…haven’t had a chance to read any of the others yet.

  • I for one have read Lord of the Rings at least 3 times. Once when I was 10, 15 and 25. Picking up new things about it every time I read it.

  • Hey everyone, I hope you all enjoyed this video! I would also like to recommend taking a look at A Tolkien Compass and The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion (as well as other reading guides) after reading the works of Tolkien’s legendarium for more information about our favorite author’s writings! Thanks

  • Too many people never read the appendices because The main story is over.but there is just SO much information in there that it’s a complete waste to skip it.

  • In Montenegro I cannot find The Unfinished Tales. Beren & Luthien and Fall of Gondolin are not even translated in Serbian. I read all I have. If only I could find these three books:(

  • Interesting! I always assumed that the History of Middle Earth was just the chapters from the Silmarillion in separate books, with maybe a little more detail. I now have more of Tolkein to love thank you SO much

  • I’m so glad you’re stressing the importance of the appendices, there is so much in there that fleshes out the stories that it’s crazy to miss them. And the Letters of Father Christmas is an adorable little book.

  • Hello there traveller; If you have come seeking information concerning the world of Tolkien, then I dare say that you have arrived at the right door. Stay a while and listen.

  • Also listen to Donald Swann’s musical settings of Tolkien’s songs Tolkien himself approved them.  My personal favourite is Namarie.

  • In Montenegro I cannot find The Unfinished Tales. Beren & Luthien and Fall of Gondolin are not even translated in Serbian. I read all I have. If only I could find these three books:(

  • For someone talking about communicative economy he needs an awful lot of time to make only a handful of points: ruins-nostalgia, LK-point of view, learning about world with character simultaneously, organic environment of learning, that’s it. I expected a lot more of this, for instance background information on major characters, explaining why we are drawn to certain characters and repulsed by others, the concept of the ring, the exact extent of Gandalf’s knowledge and power to intervene in the world vs. his “soft” power, the story of the elveshow they see themselves in the world and why their role has somehow “played out.” Really, with all due respect, this was not at all as insightful and revealing as I had expected.

  • I actually read LotR first in my mid teens, then the Silmarillion before speed reading The Hobbit (which I found rather dull really).

  • One could also argue that one should start with the Silmarillion, to learn how the world of Tolkien was created and from there read the Hobbit and LOTR, there’s really no recipe!

  • Wow… I have had my head in a hobbit hole! I have read the Hobbit, the Trilogy LOTR, and the Silmarillion… multiple times, and I knew there were a few other books… but I never knew there were as many as you mentioned! Now I will have to look into these others!

  • thank you for this. Even though I am a life long fan of the rider. It was still wonderful to hear your descriptions. I thoroughly enjoyed them.

  • There are some very strange mistakes in this documentary. Firstly, Sauron didn’t build Dol Guldur it was likely built by Oropher, Thranduil’s father, before he and his people fled to the north of Mirkwood. The King of the Dead betrayed Isildur, not Elendil. Merry didn’t kill the Witch King he was able to wound him using a dagger designed for such a purpose and this allowed Éowyn to deal the fatal blow. And Frodo was imprisoned by orcs from the tower of Cirith Ungol, not from Minas Morgul.

    Someone as exacting as Tolkien would be spinning in his grave to hear such bloopers. Please do your research the next time you attempt something like this.

  • Game of Thrones has now ended, now the Lord of the Rings will take up it’s rightful place as ruler of all. The crownless again shall be king.

  • I started with the Hobbit and then read LOTRs for the first time in the mid 70s when I was in Jr. high, but I would start with the Silmarillion if I was reading them for the first time

  • And, as far as Tom Bombadil, he has an actual identity in Middle-earth that is explored by Tom Shippey, and to which even Tolkien himself infers in “Letters” and “The History of Middle-earth.”

    Tom Bombadil is a character rather like Enlil and Enki, called a “Protoplast” in academic Mythology Studies (That means “First form” and refers to the first “Life” to arise in a myth). Tom Bombadil is the Protoplast for Middle-earth, and while Tolkien did not use that explicit word to describe him, his descriptions and the other stories he writes about Tom Bombadil make it clear that this is his role within Middle-earth. Thus he is an ‘Other’ within Middle-earth. He is a form of Life that is naturally emergent with the creation of Eä, yet which is neither a Child of Ilúvatar, nor an Ainur.

  • I read the Silmarillion first, am reading it a second time ’cause I love the First Age and elves so much, and I’m also reading Fellowship of the Ring. Started reading Two Towers years ago but I barely remember it. Thus far I’ve been in the order of Silmarillion and LOTR series. May read Hobbit after that.

  • I personally prefer exactly that way, yet, not knowing where to start from, when I started reading the books a few years ago, I started with The Silmarillion… After some time I regreted it.

  • Hobbit -> LotR Trilogy -> Return of the King Appendix -> Similrillian -> The rest of the books & notes in no particular order -> reread Hobbit & LotR with renewed appreciation and context

  • I can still remember checking out my first Tolkien book, the Hobbit, from my school library, then getting home, crawling into bed and reading “In a hole in the ground, there lived a Hobbit.” for the first time. And as fate would have it, the trailer for the first movie came out later that day.

  • I remember my dad reading The Hobbit to me as a child and I also watched the Lord Of The Rings movies and read the books. I never did get to the Silmarillion though. These were always fond memories for me (spanning from when I was 6 until I was 10). Now, at 17, I’m revisiting the wonderful world of Middle Earth with fresh eyes. I started with the movies and I was about to start on the books when I encountered this video. Definitely a helpful video and now I have an even longer reading list than before. It seems this beloved part of my childhood shall now become a beloved part of my coming adulthood too.

    (A sidenote on the video: While it’s a wonderful video. I had to put the speed down to.75 in order to understand and process it because you talk so fast.)

  • I would add the “Atlas of Middle Earth”, by Karen Wynn Fonstad. It covers every story in the three main books. It’s fantastic!!!

  • Hello there traveller; If you have come seeking information concerning the world of Tolkien, then I dare say that you have arrived at the right door. Stay a while and listen.

  • Interesting! I always assumed that the History of Middle Earth was just the chapters from the Silmarillion in separate books, with maybe a little more detail. I now have more of Tolkein to love thank you SO much

  • I have a friend who read The Silmarillion, before he read The Lord Of The Rings. He didnt even see the movies at the time he read The Silmarillion.

  • Hey you! I am a Tolkien reader since the latest 1970 and have read all his works since then! Saw the first adaption film with the music of Bo Hansen and of course all the newer films! You are a good workman of the newer sense! But in deep, there are other and deeper sources, what younger people don’t get today! All that is gold don’t glitter, don’t be the same as a strider, I am like Tom Bombadil, a man without a father, but act like so!

  • The most negative thing one could say about Tolkien’s mythology is that he was never able tae finish it. I can only how much more he would have written.

  • Maybe you should make a “how to read middle earth” video. For example, I take notes and talk to people about the world. I also look at pictures of middle earth before I go to bed.

  • I use the audiobooks because I’m too busy to read, was finally able to listen to the Lord of the Rings (minus the Appendices) and got to listen to Sir Christopher Lee read the Children of Hurin. Next on my list is Silmarilion or the Hobbit (even though the Hobbit was the first I did read as a physical book.
    Some what if ideas:
    What if Faenor had survived the Battle under the Stars and lead the Noldor during the First Age.
    What if the Fellowship had gone tot he Grey Havens and sailed down the coast to Gondor and the Up the Anduin to get to Mordor.
    And an April Fools style video, What if Faenor, after the Silmarils were stolen just shrugged it off and cut his loses and went to have a pint with his seven sons instead.

  • What year were the editions you have printed? I have a box set with the 3 Lord Of The Rings books and they’re these exact editions, and I want the rest of the books to be matching when I buy them.

  • Also, if you by any means can get it, you should read Kalevala by Elias Lonrot. A lot of the stories from Silmarillion, like Turin Turambar are based on it

  • Thanks for the video! Today I got the urge to read another of Tolkien’s books (already read The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings and Silmarillion) and your video helped me to figure out which book I want to read next (just ordered The Unfinished Tales)

  • With the last seasons of Game of thrones being turned into dog’s dinner by the writers.
    I need the upcoming LOTR series to fill the void that has been left in my chest.

  • So proud to say I’ve read all the books; The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, LOTR trilogy, and quite a bit of The Book Of Lost Tales. I encountered them at just the right time in life, when I had time to read unlike today lol. Such a wonderful journey. Oh, Children of Hurin is pretty good too.

  • Don’t get me wrong I absolutely luv this documentary but I’m finding myself cringing at every mispronunciation of names, towns, lands, etc. But hey, at least their trying! Lol ��������������‍♂️������‍♂️����������‍♀️������⚔��������������

  • Thanks for the video. Admittedly I’ve been using David Day’s maps to set up games and build maps in Age of Empires on PC. I’ll definitely go with Tolkien’s original maps going forward.:-)

  • You might have warned anybody who actually needed that information about the stylistic and tonal differences between The Hobbit and LOTR.

  • Didn’t know of the 12-volume history of Middle-earth. Will look into that. I first read “Riddles in the Dark” in sixth grade in April 1975 as that chapter was a story in our school reading series. I didn’t know it was from a novel called The Hobbit until I overheard a classmate talking about someone having to destroy a ring in the Cracks of Doom. I was hooked then, but when we went to the library to check out the book, I had to get on a waiting list as it was very popular then. So he suggested I read LOTR first and I loved it. I finally got a call from the public library that August saying The Hobbit was in, and I raced down and checked it out and read it in a lawn chair in my backyard on a beautiful sunny day. I was in hobbit Heaven! Read The Silmarillion after that and then Carpenter’s Tolkien biography. Thanks for another great video!

  • The first Tolkien book I ever read was The Silmarillion. To those who are wondering why I started there instead of reading The Hobbit and The LOTR trilogy first, is for a few reasons. The first is at the time of The original trilogy’s conclusion (Peter Jackson’s film trilogy) I wasn’t aware of The Hobbit’s existence until a few years later, and on top of that The Fellowship of the Ring video game put a bad taste in my mouth. Since I heard that game was based on the first book of the trilogy I felt that maybe those books weren’t for me. However many years later after discovering The Silmarillion, and learning how challenging it was to read, I wanted to say I read the hardest of Tolkien’s work and boy was it an indescribable experience. To learning the origins of Middle Earth, meeting Sauron’s master, and learning key events in the first age made me feel so much appreciation for the creative mind of Tolkien. The book will always hold a special place in my heart and I’m so glad it was my first book in his legendarium. I have yet to read The Hobbit, as well as TLOTR trilogy but I’m looking forward to it. Thank you for this video Men Of The West, Tolkien is smiling down upon you. ������

  • Table of Content
    >Learning by Knowledge Construction (LKC) [ 12:19]
    >>Zusammenhang of pseudo references/broken reference[ 25:14]
    >Philologists are the tribologists of text [ 42:22]
    >>Transcendental references[ 46:23]
    >Summary[ 53:04]

  • It might be worth thinking how to introduce the books to a child. Aged about 8 I discovered “The Hobbit” in our school library. I loved it. It was either the first or second proper book, i.e. not a picture-book, I ever read (The other was “Biggles Buries a Hatchet”). Soon after my mother shyly showed me an odd volume of “The Two Towers”, saying it could be a bit scary, but I might like the chapter ‘Flotsam and Jetsam’. Never looked back! (The Silmarillion doesn’t do it for me though.) Endorse all your other recs.

  • That was done very well and I appreciate your hard work. I would weigh in on the subject of which to experience first by saying that I would watch the film’s first. I’m sure devotees would think this the lazy way out but I’ve had to many bad experiences reading an awesome book first then being terribly disappointed by the movie (which I was so eager to see!). My first and most traumatic example was the book ET-The Extraterrestrial. I read it and read it again (it’s very short) and then was so excited to go to the theater only to jump up about half way through, audibly sigh my disapproval and leave. So much was changed from my beloved story that ET-The Movie was reduced to politics. My initial reading of the Hobbit and LoTR was done so about 30 years prior to the first movies coming out so I did not remember the details at all by the time the movies appeared. That was a good thing. I reiterate, I advise watching the movies first and then you will be inspired to read the TRUE stories and end up loving both!
    Second item I wanted to mention… I believe that the cover art of the Hobbit book in your video (2nd Ed.?), The reclining dragon, can be seen in the art work opening credits of the movie “Monsters Inc”. I just noticed it after a gazillion videos of yours and others. Anyway, if you look at it and agree then we can call it trivia. Again good work, sorry for this book of my own here!

  • I’d agree that ‘The Hobbit’ is the place to start for a younger reader (child or early teen); not necessarily for an adult reading Tolkien for the first time. It really depends on individual tastes.

  • thank you for this. Even though I am a life long fan of the rider. It was still wonderful to hear your descriptions. I thoroughly enjoyed them.

  • The books are sooo much better than the movies. I enjoyed the movies but I feel they were extremely rushed and it was imposible to capture the real pace at which the story develops, and also failed to capture much of the feeling of Tolkien’s narrative. For example in the books it was always a big shock for the reader any time elven appeared. They felt truly magical, sometimes spectacularly wonderful such as the first time Arwen appears. In the movies this wasn’t conveyed properly. I think they could’ve done a much better job through a TV series.

  • I suggest giving the Unabridged Sillmerilion a listen on Audible, the Narrator makes it sound so epic! The children of Hurin was my favorite, it reminded me of something out of GOT lol, its pretty messed up.

  • I first watched the movies so I read The Silmarillion first since I already knew what Middle-Earth was about and I was interested in the backstory, then The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, I’ll continue with The Unfinished Tales and then The History of Middle-Earth this summer

  • Great video! Did you purchase this from the Book Depository? Also, does this sit nicely next to the slipcased A Tolkien Tapestry? Cheers,

  • No spoilers, but there is 100% an homage to J.R.R. Tolkien’s work in the final episode of Game of Thrones. I won’t say it but when you watch the episode you’ll know what I mean

  • I am adding a second comment because Siri misspelled the word I wanted to say the word was author, I suppose. Anyway, I truly liked this video, and thank you again.

  • Hello! Love your videos, was perhaps wondering if you have had any experience in purchasing Everyman’s Library editions of classical Greek plays, such as:
    https://www.amazon.com/Theban-Plays-Everymans-Library-Cloth/dp/0679431322/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1503456293&sr=8-1&keywords=the+theban+plays+by+sophocles+everyman

  • THE GREAT WAR WAS FOUGHT BECAUSE BANKERS WANTED TO REMAKE THE WORLD WITH THEM AS THE RULERS. BUT FIRST, THEY NEEDED TO BLOW IT UP, THEN OWN IT

  • Tolkien’s art is among my favourites. A great looking edition and a good video. Thank you for making it. I’m now considering buying it.:)