Menopause, Bone Remodeling, and Brittle bones – How you can Be Positive

 

Osteoporosis Update

Video taken from the channel: University of California Television (UCTV)


 

Women’s Wellness: Bone density

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Introduction to RANKL | RANK | OPG Signaling Pathway

Video taken from the channel: JJ Medicine


 

Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women Mode of Action Animation

Video taken from the channel: CAST PHARMA


 

Menopause & You: Osteoporosis

Video taken from the channel: Main Line Health


 

Bone Remodeling and Modeling

Video taken from the channel: Amgen


 

Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

Video taken from the channel: Amgen


Menopause, Bone Remodeling, and Osteoporosis How to Be Proactive. As women age, we go through a physiological change called menopause. This occurs when there is a depletion of eggs due to aging. After a woman goes through menopause they are no longer fertile and will not have monthly menstrual cycles.

This typically happens between the ages of 45-55. This means that our bones are not as stable as they previously were and are more liable to fracture. Since estrogen levels decrease after menopause, women are at a high risk for developing osteoporosis. Be Proactive and Decrease Risk for Osteoporosis? Resistance training has been proven to be an influential option in maintaining bone mineral density.

Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bone tissue to thin and become less dense. This produces weakened bones that are more susceptible to fracture. Osteoporosis shows very few symptoms and can. If menopause is on your mind and you’re worried about osteoporosis, you can be proactive by boosting your bone health through diet and exercise.

Start by adding more calcium to your diet as soon as possible. Calcium and bone health are closely tied, as this nutrient is known for strengthening the bones. Pathophysiology of bone loss.

Bone remodeling is the process by which old bone is replaced by new bone. The normal bone remodeling process consists of five phases: the resting phase activation, resorption, reversal, and formation. In the activation phase of remodeling, osteoclasts are recruited to the surface of the bone. The increases in Ac.f at menopause and in osteoporosis patients are greater than the increases in biochemical markers of bone remodeling reported in similar subjects.

21 This may be largely because of the fact that, because they are markers of global remodeling, their values will be affected by the size of a subject’s skeleton, whereas the Ac.f. Exercise Is a Natural Way to Prevent Osteoporosis After Menopause Performing regular exercise is often a cornerstone of osteoporosis prevention for post-menopausal women because it prompts your bones to become denser. By exercising, you’re sending your body a signal that you’re going to need your bones to be strong in the future. Menopause is a time of many changes for women. But there’s no reason for one of them to be bone loss, osteoporosis, or increased fracture risk.

You have so many options to preserve your bone density — or even increase it — in the time around menopause. Since most women experience accelerated bone loss in [ ]. Osteoporosis is more likely to affect older women, especially white and Asian women, than men.

One reason for this is the impact of falling estrogen levels after menopause. Menopause significantly speeds bone loss and increases the risk for osteoporosis. Research indicates that up to 20% of bone loss can happen during these stages and approximately 1 in 10 women over the age of 60 are affected by osteoporosis worldwide.

List of related literature:

Menopause is particularly critical in the development of osteoporosis because hormones like estrogen, which facilitate bone formation, markedly decline after menopause.

“NSCA's Essentials of Personal Training” by NSCA -National Strength & Conditioning Association
from NSCA’s Essentials of Personal Training
by NSCA -National Strength & Conditioning Association
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2011

Osteoporosis can be prevented or delayed by maximizing peak bone mass in the first three decades of life and establishing positive dietary and exercise habits that can sustain the natural bone changes of menopause and aging (American Dietetic Association, 2004).

“Women's Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing” by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Women’s Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing
by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

You should also point out that osteoporosis is the most serious menopausal symptom and that there are alternatives to hormone therapy in preventing the decrease in bone mass associated with menopause.

“Modern Pharmacology with Clinical Applications” by Charles R. Craig, Robert E. Stitzel
from Modern Pharmacology with Clinical Applications
by Charles R. Craig, Robert E. Stitzel
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004

Because of these effects, an estrogen-deficient woman has a higher calcium requirement, and unless she raises her calcium intake after menopause, she will continue to lose bone after the estrogen-dependent quantum has been lost, even if the same diet would have been adequate to maintain her skeleton before menopause.

“Osteoporosis” by Robert Marcus, David W. Dempster, Jane A. Cauley, David Feldman
from Osteoporosis
by Robert Marcus, David W. Dempster, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2013

In this chapter we’ll tell you how to lower your risk of developing osteoporosis by building healthy bones before menopause and making some healthy choices in your lifestyle after menopause.

“Menopause For Dummies” by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
from Menopause For Dummies
by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
Wiley, 2011

When investigating osteoporosis in women in the past, it must also be kept in mind that bone maintenance and fragility in older women is the compound product of both age-related and postmenopausal osteoporosis.

“Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton” by M. Anne Katzenberg, Shelley R. Saunders
from Biological Anthropology of the Human Skeleton
by M. Anne Katzenberg, Shelley R. Saunders
Wiley, 2011

After age thirty or so,the body is ableto balance thetwo processes forawhile, but eventually the demolition crew begins to overtake the builders, and bone mineral densitybegins to diminish.

“Becoming Vegan, Express Edition: The Everyday Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition” by Brenda Davis, RD, Vesanto Melina, MS, RD
from Becoming Vegan, Express Edition: The Everyday Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition
by Brenda Davis, RD, Vesanto Melina, MS, RD
Book Publishing Company, 2013

After more than 15 years of working with osteoporosis, I find the most successful treatment involves not only balancing (normalizing) hormone levels, but also improving lifestyle and dietary habits that we know accelerate bone loss.

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone” by Linda G. Rector-Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone
by Linda G. Rector-Page
Traditional Wisdom, 2000

The amount of bone loss with each cycle of remodeling is accelerated after menopause; hence, the vulnerability of women to osteoporosis and its complications.

“Robbins Basic Pathology E-Book” by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Jon C. Aster
from Robbins Basic Pathology E-Book
by Vinay Kumar, Abul K. Abbas, Jon C. Aster
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Exercise is an important component of osteoporosis treatment and prevention, although exercise alone is not adequate to prevent the rapid bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency in early menopause.

“Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice” by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
from Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice
by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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7 comments

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  • Thanks for this informative overview of the many things that can contribute to bone loss in women as they age. For additional information on this subject, this article is helpful: http://lifesathomecare.com/aging-can-affect-bone-mass/

  • High calcium and Osteoporosis. Parathyroid normal so is Magnesium level. What can I do supplemental Calcium isn’t going to work!

  • Euccomia bark from far East prevents bone breaks as martial artists break boards. Lets love n share this. God bless. Plants good. Meat in moderation (size of deck of cards n mostly omega 3 fish). Go meditaranian diet. Excuse spelling, dont give a damn

  • I just had a patient with hard bright white super thick bone from Prolia. I can see why some could get the necrosis instead though.

  • One must watch out for depression in older women. Depressed women often have trouble getting motivated to cook a healthy meal from scratch. So they end up eating only or mostly snack items or things you can cook in less than ten minutes. One expert has called this the tea and toast syndrome.

  • Video is really important, and especially the ideas concerning reverse osteoporosis. Another resource I also found helpfull for anxiety postmenopausal osteoporosis treatment was Renkarter Expert Osteo Report it should be on Google if you need it

  • Three years ago, when I was 57, because of type 1 diabetes, my endocrinologist ordered a DXA scan. My T-score was -2.4, I’ve been on risedronate sodium ever since, plus a daily supplement of 1000 mg of calcium with vitamin D. Last year the DXA scan gave a T-score of -1.1. Yay! But the bone mineral density was even worse. So now, in addition to the bisphosphonate, I take an additional 1000 international units of vitamin D. In a couple of weeks, I get a third DXA scan to see how it’s going.