Existence Training Learned from Or Trail

 

The Oregon Trail IRL Challenge

Video taken from the channel: Good Mythical Morning


 

¿What About? The Oregon Trail

Video taken from the channel: The Restart Life


 

The Trail to Oregon!

Video taken from the channel: Team StarKid


 

Teen Titans Go! | The Oregon Trail | Cartoon Network

Video taken from the channel: Cartoon Network UK


 

“The Story of the Oregon Trail” VHS

Video taken from the channel: RIP VHS


 

The Oregon Trail (The Wild West)

Video taken from the channel: Simple History


 

What It Was Like to Be On the Oregon Trail

Video taken from the channel: Weird History


 

The Oregon Trail IRL Challenge

Video taken from the channel: Good Mythical Morning


 

¿What About? The Oregon Trail

Video taken from the channel: The Restart Life


 

The Trail to Oregon!

Video taken from the channel: Team StarKid


 

Teen Titans Go! | The Oregon Trail | Cartoon Network

Video taken from the channel: Cartoon Network UK


 

“The Story of the Oregon Trail” VHS

Video taken from the channel: RIP VHS


 

The Oregon Trail (The Wild West)

Video taken from the channel: Simple History


 

What It Was Like to Be On the Oregon Trail

Video taken from the channel: Weird History


Although we could play other educational games on those old computers, we always chose Oregon Trail – a game that (allegedly) taught us students about pioneer life back in the mid 1800s. In this gem of a game you control a covered wagon starting from Independence, MO and proceed along a 2,000 mile trail to Oregon. The Oregon Trail is a way to teach kids valuable life lessons. Here are 7 life lessons we learned from playing Oregon trail. My favorite three lessons from Oregon Trail can apply both to cross-country wagon journeys and your everyday financial life in the 21st century 1. Always have a spare axle in your wagon.

You’re travelling with a large family and a wagon full of gunpowder. Perhaps the most important lesson from The Oregon Trail is that no amount of preparation, planning, or meticulous management of your wagon party guarantees success. Life is bound to throw you curveballs; it’s healthy to acknowledge you. Kids who grew up with the Oregon Trail likely also played Crosscountry USA and learned to live on the road. They also got old country music stuck in their heads from time to time.

More horsepower, bigger engines the more you put into something the faster you’ll get it done and with fewer headaches. The Oregon Trail was an actual path. By 1843, when the first large wagon train was organized, a route existed across the continent from Independence, Missouri to the Pacific Ocean.

It was an actual trail, mostly connected, created by Indians and trappers. The period 1843-1855 saw the heaviest traffic on the Oregon Trail. Two words: Oregon Trail.

Oregon Trail was a game that taught students about pioneer life back in the mid 1800s. In this gem of a game, you control a covered wagon starting from Independence, Missouri, and proceed along a 2,000-mile trail to Oregon. Making a history lesson immersive can teach the wrong lessons super efficiently, teacher and Rethinking Schools editor Bill Bigelow wrote an in-depth critique of “Oregon Trail. Oregon Trail Page 2 These lesson plans were written as a guideline to teach the Oregon Trail. The lessons in this unit are directly tied to the fourth grade state standards.

The print shop order on pages 4 -6 is for the worksheets needed to teach this unit as written. Each lesson. Women along the trail learned that traveling in long skirts was a challenge, and many took to wearing the same canvas trousers as the men.

Writes the noted western historian Lillian Schlissel, “the common conditions of heat, flies, dirt, weariness, lack of water, lost cattle, fear of Indian attack and disease, all these men and women shared.”.

List of related literature:

As users of the educational computer game Oregon Trail may recall, diseases like dysentery were a frequent affliction for the pioneers, and oxen often died before finishing the trip.

“The Intellectual Devotional: American History: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Converse Confidently about Our Nation's Past” by David S. Kidder, Noah D. Oppenheim
from The Intellectual Devotional: American History: Revive Your Mind, Complete Your Education, and Converse Confidently about Our Nation’s Past
by David S. Kidder, Noah D. Oppenheim
Rodale Books, 2007

As encounters with Indians suggest, the Oregon Trail experience changed over time.

“The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History” by Carlos A. Schwantes
from The Pacific Northwest: An Interpretive History
by Carlos A. Schwantes
University of Nebraska Press, 1996

By the mid-1850s, the Oregon Trail had become much safer.

“Dear America: Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie” by Kristiana Gregory
from Dear America: Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie
by Kristiana Gregory
Scholastic Incorporated, 2012

And the southern, or Applegate, route to Oregon was probably the single most dangerous stretch of the overland trail, though by the late 1850s no trails west-or even east-of South Pass were as safe as they once had been.

“The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1840-60” by John David Unruh
from The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1840-60
by John David Unruh
University of Illinois Press, 1993

Such were the slogans that pioneer families painted on their wagons before striking out on the Oregon Trail, which began at Independence and stretched 2,000 miles across the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains to the valleys of the Oregon Territory.

“The American Patriot's Almanac: Daily Readings on America” by William J. Bennett, John T.E. Cribb
from The American Patriot’s Almanac: Daily Readings on America
by William J. Bennett, John T.E. Cribb
Thomas Nelson, 2013

By 1833 the Pawnees had surrendered their claims to all lands south of the Platte; they had also gained a dangerous reputation among the fur caravans moving along “Sublette’s Trace,” the eastern reaches of what became the Oregon Trail.

“The Oregon Trail” by Francis Parkman, E. N. Feltskog
from The Oregon Trail
by Francis Parkman, E. N. Feltskog
University of Nebraska Press, 1994

Until mid-July there had been only one trail to follow, the old Oregon Trail, which led northward to Fort Hall on the Snake River and then west to the Raft River, where the Trail to California branched off to the south and the Oregon Trail continued northwest across Idaho.

“The World Rushed In: The California Gold Rush Experience” by J. S. Holliday, Howard Roberts Lamar
from The World Rushed In: The California Gold Rush Experience
by J. S. Holliday, Howard Roberts Lamar
University of Oklahoma Press, 2015

Our Oregon Trail journey was a lovely adventure we shall never forget.

“The Oregon Trail: An American Saga” by David Dary
from The Oregon Trail: An American Saga
by David Dary
Oxford University Press, 2005

Whether traveling east to Georgia or west to Natchez, “the traveler must go through several hundred miles of wilderness, possessed by savages, and be compelled to encamp in the woods, and swim unfordable streams.”

“Alabama's Frontiers and the Rise of the Old South” by Daniel Dupre
from Alabama’s Frontiers and the Rise of the Old South
by Daniel Dupre
Indiana University Press, 2017

The trail guide helped me tolerate my frustration and gave me some idea of what to look forward to.

“Journey Through Trauma: A Trail Guide to the 5-Phase Cycle of Healing Repeated Trauma” by Gretchen Schmelzer, PhD
from Journey Through Trauma: A Trail Guide to the 5-Phase Cycle of Healing Repeated Trauma
by Gretchen Schmelzer, PhD
Hay House, 2018

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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28 comments

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  • They got to Oregon and proceeded to rape all the natural resources. Some of their descendants continue that destructive legacy to this day

  • My great great grandparents came from Wisconsin to California, they even went back and forth a few times. They got a Spanish land grant in Nevada and ended up very rich. They still kept their covered wagon in their barn. I saw a pic of my great great grandmother, she looked pretty toguh and scary. I can see why.

  • For a real contemporary account of life on the Oregon Trail, check out the book ‘The Oregon Trail’ by Francis Parkman, (available on Amazon for $12.00 in paperback). It was written in 1846 by a person who really traveled on the trail, so it’s not just a collection of hear-say and speculation, (like this video is).

  • My husband and I played the Oregon Trail card game with our 6-year old, and have since had several conversations about it. Our talks and research on the subject included leading us to this video. Thank you for this condensed, enjoyable resource. You have earned a new subscriber!

  • During that scene where Lauren explains how she eats just about everything, you can see Clark in the background processing everything she says and looking genuinely concerned for her.

  • Episodes away from the desk are always the best!!! These ones always remind me of the mythical show. God I wish they’d bring that show back

  • Some of my family members crossed the trail and then married to receive more land! They stayed married until my Ancestor, Daniel Test in 1900! Oddly enough I was born and raised in Michigan but once I was married we moved west ourselves and I now live less than 1 mile from some of the still existing wagon ruts! Thank you for this video!

  • Great video! Here are a few more dangers on the Oregon Trail for anyone interested in learning more on the subject: https://www.frontierlife.net/blog/2020/7/25/dangers-on-the-oregon-trail-primary-sources

  • What? No dysentery? Cholera was the top death instead or some shit?
    Teen Titans Go does a great parody of The Oregon Trail Game, I recommend it…even though most of Teen Titans Go is rather cheesy & no match for The Original Series…although The B.E.R. Saga makes up for it, I recommend that too. The music alone is well worth it & all over YouTube.
    The most important lesson of the Oregon Trail:
    You are going to DIE. Talk about 1,000 ways to die before Spike TV comes along.
    Cholera…DIE
    Snake bite…DIE
    Let’s not forget: Dysentery…Poop till you DIE, DIE, DIE��.

  • If you guys love The Oregon Trail game, I think you’d love Starkid’s musical called The Trail to Oregon. It’s hilarious, and based on the game.

  • 2:06 people were offered 150 acres of land. You said a football field lol wtf. 150 acres can hold roughly 120 football fields. Get your facts straight.

  • While I was in Wyoming, I had my friend drop me off and I walked 6 miles on the Oregon trail near Independence Rock where he waited for me. Imagining all those people that took the trail and I was walking in their footsteps. Saw a rattlesnake during my walk and wondered how many died along the trail from snakebites. You can go to a National Park and see the sights, but here, all alone, on the Oregon Trail, you can relive an experience that people had 140 years ago. It’s admission is free and the experience is priceless! Next time I’m out there, I plan on doing 30 or 40 miles and camping overnight. When you get to Independence Rock, you’ll see all the names carved in it from the 1840’s and 50’s wagon trains.

  • i feel like the show makes it seem like more people like rhett… but guess what… this show wouldnt be the show without link!!! so shut yo traps lol

  • Your “gun deaths” remark was a little misleading. You should have said “accidental gun deaths” because a lot of these folks were unfamiliar with how to use a gun. Accidents happened.

  • Man I really don’t understand why this people were dying of all of these diseases…. the natives we’re traveling the same road all the time and have lives there for thousands of years

  • Episodes away from the desk are always the best!!! These ones always remind me of the mythical show. God I wish they’d bring that show back

  • Ahem! Any WHITE person could receive 160 acres, in return for growing crops. A significant proportion of white families today, owe their affluence in part to the ‘Homestead Act.’

  • That was grest thank you for putting togather a wonderful summation of what maters most…History must be passed on to are children..please..

  • I recently bought a handheld version of “The Oregon trail”
    I’m only in my 20s and have heard alot about the game.
    It is pretty fun but I think it would be cool if they came out with a modern version of the game on the consoles.
    It could still be educational and fun.

  • Back when I was still in school, the computer lab existed only as a novelty, and one could be banished from that privilege for an entire semester for making a profane epitaph on this game.

  • Round one was basically the original Oregon Trail, except nobody died or lost a wheel in the river. I never made it past the trail to the homestead. Also, Rhett is a slightly bigger target, so I’m not surprised Link got more hits in.

  • PLEASE more videos like this!
    I watch this challenge video like 20 times and it still makes me laugh
    Please can you do more videos like this!?

  • 1:13, picture of Mt. Joseph in northeast Oregon. Named after Chief Joseph, his burial site near a glacial lake at the base of the mountains.

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  • In school I read a book that was a choice book about the Oregon trail and I was supposed to be a family traveling on it or a leader of it you choose choices to get different endings

  • Me at 2am: CRAPHOOOLE! YEAH THAT’S ME! I’M SEVEN AND I’M MALE!!! MOUTHFACE! THAT’S WHAT MY FRIENDS CALL ME! I’M LOOKING FOR LOVE ON THE TRAIL!!!

  • 1:13, picture of Mt. Joseph in northeast Oregon. Named after Chief Joseph, his burial site near a glacial lake at the base of the mountains.

  • Me at 2am: CRAPHOOOLE! YEAH THAT’S ME! I’M SEVEN AND I’M MALE!!! MOUTHFACE! THAT’S WHAT MY FRIENDS CALL ME! I’M LOOKING FOR LOVE ON THE TRAIL!!!