Top Dirty Dozen And Clean 15 Foods

 

Talking about the ‘Clean 15’ and ‘Dirty Dozen’

Video taken from the channel: Citytv


 

Dirty Dozen List For 2020 What Fruits & Veggies To Buy Organic vs Conventional

Video taken from the channel: FlavCity with Bobby Parrish


 

Top 12 Contaminated Foods to NEVER Eat Non-Organic

Video taken from the channel: FullyRawKristina


 

Dirty Dozen & Clean Fifteen Explainer + Shopping Tips | You Versus Food | Well+Good

Video taken from the channel: Well+Good


 

2019 Dirty Dozen Food List “Bad Fruits & Veggies”

Video taken from the channel: FreddyO


 

Dirty Dozen + Clean 15 Environmental Working Group Shopper’s Guide | Andrew Weil, M.D.

Video taken from the channel: Andrew Weil, M.D.


 

Organic vs Conventional Produce The Dirty Dozen & Clean 15 Explained

Video taken from the channel: FlavCity with Bobby Parrish


 

Clean 15 VS. Dirty Dozen

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Livingood


 

Dirty Dozen & Clean Fifteen Explainer + Shopping Tips | You Versus Food | Well+Good

Video taken from the channel: Well+Good


 

Talking about the ‘Clean 15’ and ‘Dirty Dozen’

Video taken from the channel: Citytv


 

Top 12 Contaminated Foods to NEVER Eat Non-Organic

Video taken from the channel: FullyRawKristina


 

2019 Dirty Dozen Food List “Bad Fruits & Veggies”

Video taken from the channel: FreddyO


 

Dirty Dozen + Clean 15 Environmental Working Group Shopper’s Guide | Andrew Weil, M.D.

Video taken from the channel: Andrew Weil, M.D.


 

Organic vs Conventional Produce The Dirty Dozen & Clean 15 Explained

Video taken from the channel: FlavCity with Bobby Parrish


In 2019 strawberries, spinach, and kale top the list. Avocados, sweet corn, and pineapple made the “Clean Fifteen” list. Mushrooms.

Cabbage. Honeydew Melon. Kiwi. ( Source) The Environmental Working Group also suggests another reason to look to buy the Clean 15 foods when they are organically grown is because: Small amount of sweet corn, papaya and summer squash sold in the United States is produced from genetically modified seeds.

Top Dirty Dozen And Clean 15 Foods. AFP/Relaxnews. 04/30/2014 04:32am EDT | Updated May 8, 2014.

Created with Sketch. In the Environmental Working Group’s annual Dirty Dozen lis. According to the EWG, the Dirty Dozen is a list of the 12 fruits and vegetables that contain the highest concentrations of pesticides, which the EWG recommends buying organic.

The Clean Fifteen is a list of 15 fruits and vegetables that contain the fewest concentrations of pesticides, which the EWG believes are the safest foods to buy conventionally.. The lists are assembled based on data. The Environmental Working Group released its 2019 Dirty Dozen foods report, with strawberries, spinach, and kale topping the list. Here’s what to know about pesticides and your health. Produce on the EWG’s Clean Fifteen for 2014 are the least likely to hold pesticide residues.

Relatively few pesticides were detected on these foods, and tests found low total concentrations of pesticides. You don’t need to buy these organic. The Clean Fifteen. 1. Avocados 2. Sweet corn 3. Pineapples 4. Cabbage 5. Frozen sweet peas 6. Onions 7. Asparagus 8. 2019 Dirty Dozen & Clean 15 Key Findings Summary. Avocados and sweet corn were the cleanest.

Less than 1 percent of samples showed any detectable pesticides. More than 70 percent of Clean Fifteen fruit and vegetable samples had no pesticide residues. Almost 70% of these samples had no pesticide residues whatsoever: Avocados Sweet corn Pineapple Onions Papaya Sweet Peas (Frozen) Eggplant Asparagus Cauliflower Cantaloupes Broccoli Mushrooms Cabbage Honeydew Melon Kiwi. Here are some highlights from the Clean 15 list: Avocados and sweet corn were the cleanest tested, with fewer than 2 percent of samples showing any detectable pesticides.

More than 80 percent of pineapples, papayas, asparagus, onions and cabbages contained no pesticide residues. The Dirty Dozen is a phrase that refers to 12 “dirty” crops that farmers use the most pesticides on. Alternatively, the Clean Fifteen refers to fifteen crops that use the least amount of pesticides.

List of related literature:

87 The fact that the higher-ranking foods are clean while the lower-ranking foods are highly processed is no surprise.

“Eating Clean For Dummies” by Jonathan Wright, Linda Johnson Larsen
from Eating Clean For Dummies
by Jonathan Wright, Linda Johnson Larsen
Wiley, 2016

The Dirty Dozen includes the fruits and vegetables that have the highest levels of pesticides when grown conventionally.

“Little Foodie: Recipes for Babies and Toddlers with Taste” by Michele Olivier, Sara Peternell
from Little Foodie: Recipes for Babies and Toddlers with Taste
by Michele Olivier, Sara Peternell
Arcas Publishing, 2014

Its acquisitions included: Duncan Hines and Hines-Park Foods (food products), W. T. Young Foods (peanut butter and nuts), J. A. Folger (coffee), and Clorox Chemical Co. (bleach).

“Global Electronic Commerce: Theory and Case Studies” by J. Christopher Westland Theodore H. K. Clark, Westland Christopher J, J. Christopher Westland, Theodore H. K. Clark, Theodore H. K.. Clark
from Global Electronic Commerce: Theory and Case Studies
by J. Christopher Westland Theodore H. K. Clark, Westland Christopher J, et. al.
MIT Press, 1999

The “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen”2 are lists published annually of foods with higher and lower pesticide exposure, respectively, to help you choose which foods to eat organic.

“Every Victory Counts (Fixed Layout)” by Monique Giroux, Sierra Farris
from Every Victory Counts (Fixed Layout)
by Monique Giroux, Sierra Farris
Davis Phinney Foundation, 2017

The clean fifteen includes avocadoes, cabbage, onions, asparagus, eggplant, cauliflower, and sweet potatoes.

“Nutrition Facts: The Truth About Food” by Karen Frazier
from Nutrition Facts: The Truth About Food
by Karen Frazier
Callisto Media Incorporated, 2015

On the second day of business Ogilvy made a list of the five clients he most desired: General Foods, Bristol-Myers, Campbell Soup, Lever Brothers, and Shell Oil.

“Forbes Greatest Business Stories of All Time” by Forbes Magazine Staff, Daniel Gross
from Forbes Greatest Business Stories of All Time
by Forbes Magazine Staff, Daniel Gross
Wiley, 1997

Food Protection Trends 29(6):342–353 Sotir MJ, Ewald G, Kimura AC, Higa JI, Seth A, Troppy S, Myer S, Hoekstra RM, Austin J, Archer J, Spayne M, Daly ER, Griffin PM (2009) Outbreak of Salmonella Wandsworth and Typhimurium infections in infants and toddlers traced to a commercial vegetable-coated snack food.

“The Microbiological Safety of Low Water Activity Foods and Spices” by Joshua B. Gurtler, Michael P. Doyle, Jeffrey L. Kornacki
from The Microbiological Safety of Low Water Activity Foods and Spices
by Joshua B. Gurtler, Michael P. Doyle, Jeffrey L. Kornacki
Springer New York, 2014

Food Questions Answered, USFA bulletin, March 1918, 7, folder “Publications,” box 5, series 5H, USFA Collection, Hoover Institution.

“Modern Food, Moral Food: Self-Control, Science, and the Rise of Modern American Eating in the Early Twentieth Century” by Helen Zoe Veit
from Modern Food, Moral Food: Self-Control, Science, and the Rise of Modern American Eating in the Early Twentieth Century
by Helen Zoe Veit
University of North Carolina Press, 2013

You can put all the TV Show Pages on one list, all the Natural food chefs in another, and so on.

“Facebook Marketing All-in-One For Dummies” by Amy Porterfield, Phyllis Khare, Andrea Vahl
from Facebook Marketing All-in-One For Dummies
by Amy Porterfield, Phyllis Khare, Andrea Vahl
Wiley, 2012

Each year, the EWG releases two important lists to help us reduce our exposure to pesticides from fruits and vegetables: the Dirty Dozen Plus™ reveals the 12+ fruits and veggies that contain the most pesticides, while the Clean 15™ tells us the 15 that contain the least (EWG, 2014).

“CANINE NUTRIGENOMICS: THE NEW SCIENCE OF FEEDING YOUR DOG FOR OPTIMUM HEALTH” by W. Jean Dodds, DVM, Diana Laverdure
from CANINE NUTRIGENOMICS: THE NEW SCIENCE OF FEEDING YOUR DOG FOR OPTIMUM HEALTH
by W. Jean Dodds, DVM, Diana Laverdure
Dogwise Publishing, 2014

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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  • Debunking the pesticide residue myth by Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, FAND

    I am a registered dietitian who believes that any form of fruits and vegetables are healthy – organic or conventional. However, there are so many myths surrounding pesticides and fruits and vegetables that it’s mind boggling for consumers to wade through the confusion. So much so that research has found that some consumers are even scared to buy fresh produce! Here’s a look at the research and what you should know about pesticide residues and fruits and vegetables.

    A Recent Survey Among Registered Dietitians (RDs)

    A recent survey found that 95% of RDs agree that it’s important for consumers to know that conventionally grown produce is safe because not all consumers can afford organic produce. However, peer reviewed research has previously shown that fear-based messaging regarding residues resulted in low income consumers stating they were less like to purchase any produce—organic or conventional.

    Researchers at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s (IIT) Center for Nutrition Research surveyed low income consumers to learn more about what terms and information about fruits and vegetables may influence their shopping intentions. Among the key findings, misleading messaging which inaccurately describes certain fruits and vegetables as having “higher” pesticide residues results in low income shoppers reporting that they would be less likely to purchase any fruits and vegetables – organic or conventional. There is a plethora of research which shows eating any form of fruit and vegetables provides more health benefits than skipping them altogether.

    In the aforementioned RD survey, 94% of RDs agree that these sorts of inaccurate, fear-based messaging regarding pesticide residues has a negative impact on consumers because it causes concern about whether conventionally-grown fruits and vegetables are safe to eat. In addition, 93% of the RDs surveyed agreed that consumers should eat more fruits and vegetables every day, whether it’s organic or conventionally grown. Both are safe and can be eaten with confidence.

    Facts About Pesticide Residue

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently released its latest (2018) Pesticide Data Program (PDP) results. The findings were consistent with past results, and complementary to other state and federal testing programs. The summary showed more than 99% of the samples tested had pesticide residues well below benchmark levels established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, 47.8% of the foods tested had no detectable pesticide residue at all. These EPA benchmarks were set to ensure that pesticide residues remain at safe levels.

    The Alliance for Food and Farming has created a fabulous tool called the “Pesticide Residue Calculator” to help consumers calculate the amount of fresh produce they would need to consume in order to exceed the EPAs pesticide residue benchmarks. For example, a woman could consume 453 servings of strawberries in one day without any effect even if the strawberries have the highest pesticide residue recorded for strawberries. With 8 strawberries per serving, that would mean eating a total of 3,624 strawberries in one day!

    What About Dried Fruit?

    One of the most popular dried fruits (and one I use regularly in my cookbooks) is raisins. Raisins are a natural and healthy dried product, an easy and quick snack for kids and a non-perishable pantry staple. According to the USDA PDP Report, which included raisins in its 2018 sampling program, the vast majority of residues found on raisins were well below safety levels established by the EPA. The raisin industry is also subject to an annual comprehensive survey, which shows that raisins are grown in compliance with pesticide safety standards established by the EPA.

    The Benefits of Eating More Fruits and Vegetables

    According to the 2015-2020 dietary guidelines for Americans, approximately 90% of Americans do not meet the daily recommendations for vegetables and close to 80% don’t meet the daily recommendations for fruit. A peer reviewed study found that if half of all Americans increased their consumption of fruit and vegetables by a single serving each day, 20,000 cancer cases could be prevented annually. This overwhelming difference between the benefit and risk estimates provides confidence that consumers should not be concerned about cancer risks from choosing conventionally grown produce.

    As a registered dietitian, I am “pro-choice” when it comes to produce—but the choice is the consumer’s alone. Whether someone wants to eat organic or conventional, it is important to eat fruits and vegetables of any type (fresh, dried, canned, or frozen). No matter which fruits and vegetables you choose to eat, be proud of choosing foods that help contribute tremendous health benefits.” https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/guest-blog-debunking-the-pesticide-residue-myth/

  • Farmer’s Market haul would be awesome! I go to the farmer’s markets quite often but they can be expensive on certain items, I’m torn about organic strawberries because the last packs I bought,I bit into one and there was a larva/worm

  • Wouldn’t anything bad sprayed on plants falloff into dirt & get absorbed by roots & into said fruits & vegs except cabbage & broccoli?

  • I’ve been trying to research for buying organic legumes vs non-organic and I can’t find anything. Also, what about nuts? I sometimes aim for organic almonds (and almond flour) but do I really have to? What’s your opinion on this one? Thank you in advance!

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Be informed about what kinds of products are used by organic farmers. Many people like to purchase organic produce because they believe that it has not been sprayed with pesticides. This is not a correct assumption. The fact is most organic fruits and vegetables have been sprayed, but with different products.

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce
    https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • hi kristina, do you suggest peeling the skins off everything or are there def certain fruits and veggies you should keep the skin on?

  • Is banana in Clean 15? If it’s not COVID 19 and transportation is working I’d love to buy your book here in Korea. thanks always for super great information.

  • Bobby! You guys are the best thing ever! I’ve been binging on your videos but what I always think about and want to learn is the differences on salt. I’m not sure if you touch on that in any video but I would love to learn more and who better to teach me than you! Thank you #adoreyall

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • I never bought organic as it’s expensive, but after watching this I’ll be getting organic for spinach and kale. If you peel the fruit, is buying conventional ok?

  • Hi Kristina, thank you for your video. However, organic doesn’t mean pesticide-free. I read several articles and studies about that. It means that in organic food the pesticides must be derived from natural sources, not synthetically manufactured. A real organic apple looks way less nicer than the ones you find in the supermarket. It has holes due to the bugs and it is much smaller. When you test synthetic chemicals (used in non-organic food) for their ability to cause cancer, you find that about half of them are carcinogenic.
    Until recently, nobody bothered to look at natural chemicals (such as organic pesticides), because it was assumed that they posed little risk. But when the studies were done, the results were somewhat shocking: you find that about half of the natural chemicals studied are carcinogenic as well. This is a case where everyone (consumers, farmers, researchers) made the same, dangerous mistake. We assumed that “natural” chemicals were automatically better and safer than synthetic materials, and we were wrong. It’s important that we become more prudent in our acceptance of “natural” as being innocuous and harmless. The purpose in writing this comment is not to discourage people from buying organic produce. It is only meant to let you know what you are or aren’t getting when you make such a purchase. Unless you know your grower personally, there is no guarantee that your produce has been grown without pesticides or other chemicals. It’s a point to consider, given the substantially higher cost of organic foods.

    Data that describes the carcinogenicity of natural and synthetic compounds are referenced in Gold, L.S., et al. (1992) Science Vol. 258, pp. 261-265.

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Not too far from me Upstate New York in Troy has a farmers market. I went there thinking that it would be organic surprise almost nothing is organic in a farmers market. But the prices are high.

  • I’ve been trying to research for buying organic legumes vs non-organic and I can’t find anything. Also, what about nuts? I sometimes aim for organic almonds (and almond flour) but do I really have to? What’s your opinion on this one? Thank you in advance!

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce

    https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Bobby, why aren’t you wearing one of your flavcity t-shirts today? More importantly, why isn’t beautiful Rose Honey ALWAYS modelling one?

  • Have you ever made a video on the most nutritious gluten-free foods? My 16-year-old son is celiac and I want to make sure he’s getting all the nutrition he can

  • its always good to cite your sources. dirty dozen and clean fifteen is all from EWG. You make it sound as if its your thinking. Give credit where its due. https://www.ewg.org/

  • Great coverage of the dirty 12 and clean 15, bravo. Only concern is that GMO outrage was debunked a while back…not really sure why he’s still harping on them. It negatively impacts his overall credibility.

  • There’s tons of blueberries in the woods, so no need to buy them since they’re so easily stored. (Blueberries are awesome!:D)
    Ok, now I want blueberries… to the refigerator!

  • @FlavCity
    I have a question for you Bobby, i know you mentioned how any melons you can buy conventional due to how we eat it removing the rine, however sometimes when people do juicing they will add the rine of watermelon for instance to a juicer for extra benefits. So if someone is doing that, then organic would be better, correct? Cause otherwise you’d be drinking all the pesticides…

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.
    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.
    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.
    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director
    Alliance for Food and Farming
    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • thank you song thank you so much for letting us know that we can eat these sorts of foods that we can meet but I don’t only want to know vegetables and fruits I want to know some other food like bread meet and sorts of that so I want to know like one of those don’t have pesticides to make us have all the varieties of bad things that you were talking about

  • Nokm,,m,,,ll,,k,,kkkklllllllllll
    Lokoolllllllllllllllllolllllllllllllllllllll loop kkkkkoollllpoolllppplppoikOzoaooollllllllkkkkkkkkooookioooooo9kmmmmm mop mj

  • hi i am from Canada and when i was a child we had two acres of land and grew everything organic..no pesticides no chemicals even our apple andif y cherry trees had no sprays. it was awesome. i was never sick…i left home started eating junk food then i noticed my body changing and i gain weight had flus etc. so now i am growing veggies off of my balcony with organic seeds and soil and its amazing what you can grow off of your balcony in a appartment. but i use stainless steel or another non plastic container and i make lots of holes in the bottom of the can and add about two inches of clean rocks and then add my soil and plants which i grew inside first. or you can buy organic plants…tomatoes love a deep root system. so put only one plant in a tall 3 foot container. you need to learn how to do container gardening. i love the pole beans which freeze up good..so get a small deep freeze and have a couple of plants on the baloncy if you like peas as well. have fun learning…its the life god gave us way back in Eden and he plans to bring all that happiness back to good people again.
    back to eden..read psalms 37: 9, 10,11,29 Revelation 21: 3,4 Daniel 2: 44 and many more scriptures i could bring out that say that God’s plan has not change. soon his will to be done on earth is coming fast and you young people will see it. I just wrote this for people who believe in our heavenly father and his written word the bible. So best wishes to everyone, and start taking care of your body and LOL get down and get dirtly in the dirt and see what you can get growing in that good ole soil. one last thing MOTHER EARTH NEWS is a awesome magazine you can get…its beenb around for over 20 years, as it teaches you how to live off the land….bye

  • I never bought organic as it’s expensive, but after watching this I’ll be getting organic for spinach and kale. If you peel the fruit, is buying conventional ok?

  • I bought some organic bananas but they say on the packet they have only been sprayed with safe stuff so really they still sprayed:(

  • this video was super important, so thank you! It could be because I had a headache but the presenter had too much energy for me; wish I had that energy myself!!

  • hello everyone i want to know that sweet fruits such as jackfruit or durain can make us fat? and how about frutose content in the fruits harm our body like sugar?

  • I find that lists like these are a bit over-simplified; I’d rather know which produce has more than “x” amount of pesticides in them. Number 14 on the list might have ten times the toxic load as 15 and so on. I’ve looked for this information but without success.

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • YES broccoli and cabbage are two of my favorite veggies, especially broccoli but still buy organic unless no choice so good to know.

  • You’re a damn imbecile if you don’t mention any meats that you should always buy organic, and i can easily tell you why
    1. None/significantly less antibiotics used
    2. Bio availability is higher in organic meats

  • I keep looking on these lists and womder where is broccoli and brocolini on this list. Any thoughts? Not like its not a popular veggie ��

  • Organic Vegetables are not vegan
    -Organic Fertilizers can Include manure
    -Manure comes from factory animals
    -Therefore Organic produce is not vegan

  • Because of your videos I switched to only eating organic spinach and although I don’t eat apples, I love applesauce. Today you reminded me I should only eat organic applesauce. It’s a shame that a lot of children are eating applesauce laden with many pesticides and chemicals.

  • its always good to cite your sources. dirty dozen and clean fifteen is all from EWG. You make it sound as if its your thinking. Give credit where its due. https://www.ewg.org/

  • Love the videos. Thank you Bobby, Art, and Rose! ����
    Could you do a video on healthy desserts and snacks for diabetics? Thank you! ��

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce
    https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Thank you so much Bobby for sharing your valuable knowledge. I have the lists on our fridge for my family to see and memorize! I wanted to ask you about bananas and watermelon? Are they safe to buy non-organic?I have been a follower for a while now, you have taught me so much! Keep up you fantastic work:))

  • You should do a video of GMOs in produce explained more. Also on the video you made at Walmart talking about GMOs you’re saying its pretty much safe to eat all the produce that’s not on the Dirty Dozen. So I could go buy any conventional produce at any store that is not on Dirty Dozen list right?

  • always eat healthy foods is that it will Pegasus it is on the same when I know about it so frozen yeah that’s what I’m thinking always need help always eat healthy food so just always eat healthy things that you can’t eat that much decided to have pesticides at all

  • I keep looking on these lists and womder where is broccoli and brocolini on this list. Any thoughts? Not like its not a popular veggie ��

  • [Insert naturalistic fallacy here]
    [Insert organic doesn’t use pesticides here]    
    [Cite obviously biased source here]
    [Call a shill]
    [Enjoy your poison]
    [Insert something about god here]    
    [Misspell glyphosate]
    [Science has been wrong before]
    [Cite cherry picked/disproved study here]

  • Thank you for educating us on all this stuff.. I love love your show. You have changed the way I grocery shop and cook. My husband also loves your cooking recipes.

  • Debunking the pesticide residue myth by Toby Amidor, MS, RD, CDN, FAND

    I am a registered dietitian who believes that any form of fruits and vegetables are healthy – organic or conventional. However, there are so many myths surrounding pesticides and fruits and vegetables that it’s mind boggling for consumers to wade through the confusion. So much so that research has found that some consumers are even scared to buy fresh produce! Here’s a look at the research and what you should know about pesticide residues and fruits and vegetables.

    A Recent Survey Among Registered Dietitians (RDs)

    A recent survey found that 95% of RDs agree that it’s important for consumers to know that conventionally grown produce is safe because not all consumers can afford organic produce. However, peer reviewed research has previously shown that fear-based messaging regarding residues resulted in low income consumers stating they were less like to purchase any produce—organic or conventional.

    Researchers at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s (IIT) Center for Nutrition Research surveyed low income consumers to learn more about what terms and information about fruits and vegetables may influence their shopping intentions. Among the key findings, misleading messaging which inaccurately describes certain fruits and vegetables as having “higher” pesticide residues results in low income shoppers reporting that they would be less likely to purchase any fruits and vegetables – organic or conventional. There is a plethora of research which shows eating any form of fruit and vegetables provides more health benefits than skipping them altogether.

    In the aforementioned RD survey, 94% of RDs agree that these sorts of inaccurate, fear-based messaging regarding pesticide residues has a negative impact on consumers because it causes concern about whether conventionally-grown fruits and vegetables are safe to eat. In addition, 93% of the RDs surveyed agreed that consumers should eat more fruits and vegetables every day, whether it’s organic or conventionally grown. Both are safe and can be eaten with confidence.

    Facts About Pesticide Residue

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently released its latest (2018) Pesticide Data Program (PDP) results. The findings were consistent with past results, and complementary to other state and federal testing programs. The summary showed more than 99% of the samples tested had pesticide residues well below benchmark levels established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, 47.8% of the foods tested had no detectable pesticide residue at all. These EPA benchmarks were set to ensure that pesticide residues remain at safe levels.

    The Alliance for Food and Farming has created a fabulous tool called the “Pesticide Residue Calculator” to help consumers calculate the amount of fresh produce they would need to consume in order to exceed the EPAs pesticide residue benchmarks. For example, a woman could consume 453 servings of strawberries in one day without any effect even if the strawberries have the highest pesticide residue recorded for strawberries. With 8 strawberries per serving, that would mean eating a total of 3,624 strawberries in one day!

    What About Dried Fruit?

    One of the most popular dried fruits (and one I use regularly in my cookbooks) is raisins. Raisins are a natural and healthy dried product, an easy and quick snack for kids and a non-perishable pantry staple. According to the USDA PDP Report, which included raisins in its 2018 sampling program, the vast majority of residues found on raisins were well below safety levels established by the EPA. The raisin industry is also subject to an annual comprehensive survey, which shows that raisins are grown in compliance with pesticide safety standards established by the EPA.

    The Benefits of Eating More Fruits and Vegetables

    According to the 2015-2020 dietary guidelines for Americans, approximately 90% of Americans do not meet the daily recommendations for vegetables and close to 80% don’t meet the daily recommendations for fruit. A peer reviewed study found that if half of all Americans increased their consumption of fruit and vegetables by a single serving each day, 20,000 cancer cases could be prevented annually. This overwhelming difference between the benefit and risk estimates provides confidence that consumers should not be concerned about cancer risks from choosing conventionally grown produce.

    As a registered dietitian, I am “pro-choice” when it comes to produce—but the choice is the consumer’s alone. Whether someone wants to eat organic or conventional, it is important to eat fruits and vegetables of any type (fresh, dried, canned, or frozen). No matter which fruits and vegetables you choose to eat, be proud of choosing foods that help contribute tremendous health benefits.” https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/guest-blog-debunking-the-pesticide-residue-myth/

  • There’s tons of blueberries in the woods, so no need to buy them since they’re so easily stored. (Blueberries are awesome!:D)
    Ok, now I want blueberries… to the refigerator!

  • e muito bom ser crudiverA EM TODOS OS ASPECTOS,MAS é muito carissimo. todos os videos seus,so tem coisas boas e caras por exemplo: castannha de caju e tamaras e carissimo aqui no brasil sou louca pela aquelas tortas doces cupcake cru…carissimo!!!!!esse liquidificador e carissimo uns r$ 3.800,000nem existe aqui no brasil,sonhando com um…..syssa

  • e muito bom ser crudiverA EM TODOS OS ASPECTOS,MAS é muito carissimo. todos os videos seus,so tem coisas boas e caras por exemplo: castannha de caju e tamaras e carissimo aqui no brasil sou louca pela aquelas tortas doces cupcake cru…carissimo!!!!!esse liquidificador e carissimo uns r$ 3.800,000nem existe aqui no brasil,sonhando com um…..syssa

  • this video was super important, so thank you! It could be because I had a headache but the presenter had too much energy for me; wish I had that energy myself!!

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • I hope that you don’t eat potatos raw and you are not telling that to people. Am saying this even though i love that you are there.

  • thank you song thank you so much for letting us know that we can eat these sorts of foods that we can meet but I don’t only want to know vegetables and fruits I want to know some other food like bread meet and sorts of that so I want to know like one of those don’t have pesticides to make us have all the varieties of bad things that you were talking about

  • Bobby, how’s Chicago doing as far as civil unrest right now? I need to make my way over there for hyperbaric therapy very soon and was wondering if you think it’s all good to visit the city.

  • You’re a damn imbecile if you don’t mention any meats that you should always buy organic, and i can easily tell you why
    1. None/significantly less antibiotics used
    2. Bio availability is higher in organic meats

  • Is banana in Clean 15? If it’s not COVID 19 and transportation is working I’d love to buy your book here in Korea. thanks always for super great information.

  • I would put strawberry’s in the #1 position to only buy organic. The conventional’s are so irradiated they are very toxic. They get inside the berry itself so washing the outside won’t do much good. I either buy Organic Strawberry’s when on sale or i eat none at all

  • Can you come to the UK & do some episodes here pretty please? I’m so jealous of how big your health food stores are over there & all the products you mention that are good in the shops, I cannot purchase them here & I get so disappointed! Lol. I know some people in the UK would love it, we have far less options in our stores here unfortunately so can be difficult to know what to purchase, we also have tiny health stores. Thanks in advance, Jessica.

  • Do you know anything about the fertilizer Coop Poop? I am sick to my stomach that I put this on my veggies I planted after spending hundreds of dollars to make my garden all organic. Coop Poop can’t be sold in California for some reason but it has the OMRI label. Thank you for any information.

  • I think rules and regulations/ploicies are different in EUROPE, are they not? Does anyone know anything about this? I know that GMO’s are illegal in the EU union countries, and I’m pretty lucky to not have to worry about that (yet) in Norway. How ever Norwegian law is more strict on use of pesticides for food and greens. But we do import very much conventional from Netherlands, Spain, Isreal, France etc.
    I love watching these videos about things to avoid that can be toxic in our enviroment cause i love learning more every day about optimal health. It just gets frustrating sometimes not knowing if many of these things only apply in the US etc.

    Anyways, lovely movie, very informative and educational. Thank you.

  • Funny I was just buying fruits and veggies yesterday and thought I wish I knew which ones need to be organic or not. I wonder if Bobbys done a video on this and BOOM!

  • I have been watching and following you, I learned tremendous amount of valuable information on how we use so much pesticides That is so harmful for our health as well as our precious soil. Thank you for your energy and effort. great work.

  • I can’t eat strawberries anymore after that video going around! Is that true? The one with the worms! And I try to only buy organic for everything! “When available”

  • You can do a baking water, baking soda and white vinegar soak for 10 minutes, then rinse to remove a lot of pesticide from outer skin, and also from berries. Doesn’t impact flavor but helps clean up. I use even on organic berries as pesticides are difficult to remove from berries. Loutus used to make a machine that removed up to 90% of pesticides, but no longer sells it.

  • Hi there! I am kind of new. I discovered your videos like three weeks ago, so I am trying to catch up! I do enjoy your videos, thank you for doing what you do �� wondering about cucumber �� and jicama, do they need to be organic?

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • I think rules and regulations/ploicies are different in EUROPE, are they not? Does anyone know anything about this? I know that GMO’s are illegal in the EU union countries, and I’m pretty lucky to not have to worry about that (yet) in Norway. How ever Norwegian law is more strict on use of pesticides for food and greens. But we do import very much conventional from Netherlands, Spain, Isreal, France etc.
    I love watching these videos about things to avoid that can be toxic in our enviroment cause i love learning more every day about optimal health. It just gets frustrating sometimes not knowing if many of these things only apply in the US etc.

    Anyways, lovely movie, very informative and educational. Thank you.

  • Thank you for educating us on all this stuff.. I love love your show. You have changed the way I grocery shop and cook. My husband also loves your cooking recipes.

  • Nokm,,m,,,ll,,k,,kkkklllllllllll
    Lokoolllllllllllllllllolllllllllllllllllllll loop kkkkkoollllpoolllppplppoikOzoaooollllllllkkkkkkkkooookioooooo9kmmmmm mop mj

  • [Insert naturalistic fallacy here]
    [Insert organic doesn’t use pesticides here]    
    [Cite obviously biased source here]
    [Call a shill]
    [Enjoy your poison]
    [Insert something about god here]    
    [Misspell glyphosate]
    [Science has been wrong before]
    [Cite cherry picked/disproved study here]

  • I was looking for organic orange peel videos and saw a video for injecting water melon, in Africa dunking oranges in dyes, and another off shore dunking pickles in a dye.

  • Organic fruits (esp) and vegetables are honestly cost prohibitive. Esp for the average person. Period. So, just for the sake of “argument”, lets say that Organic fruits and vegetables did not exist and all fruits and vegetable were as they are now. Are you going to say that the pesticides and history of soil abuse on regular fruits and vegetables are SO toxic and life threatening that…. perhaps we should be eating gummy bears? or Mars bars? frozen pizza or Doritos?…. really? the way this dirty dozen is presented, you would think that one should eat ANYthing rather than regular fruits and vegetables. Is there any sort of middle ground? like washing your vegetables? maybe in salt or Soda? or? anything else we can do to get those dirty strawberries and blueberries and god forbid spinach down into our stomachs and still live a life? excuse me while I go heat up my frozen turkey pot pie (JOKEing, sort of), I’m a veggie-tarian:P May I just “suggest” in the nicest most polite way that is is better to consume fruits and vegetables in a balanced diet rather than not. Or worse yet, freak out at your mom’s table having strawberry shortcake.

  • @FlavCity
    I have a question for you Bobby, i know you mentioned how any melons you can buy conventional due to how we eat it removing the rine, however sometimes when people do juicing they will add the rine of watermelon for instance to a juicer for extra benefits. So if someone is doing that, then organic would be better, correct? Cause otherwise you’d be drinking all the pesticides…

  • Have you ever made a video on the most nutritious gluten-free foods? My 16-year-old son is celiac and I want to make sure he’s getting all the nutrition he can

  • If you ever come to Texas after covid can you hit up a bucees and let us know what you think and thank you for you videos you have helped me take control of my diabetes it hasn’t gone away but I’m on track in getting my life back together

  • Thank you, I have always been a label reader, taught by my Mama. Now, however, I compare all ingredients on my canned foods, snacks, and drinks. On my fresh veggies and fruits, it’s bargains only. Lol. Nowadays I am interested in non dairy ice creams, cheeses, eggs Happy to see Breyers, a family favorite has non dairy ice creams. You and your crew are doing a nice job.

  • I use a Lemon & Vinegar wash on fresh fruits and vegetables I buy at the grocery store. I wonder if Dr. Weil recommends that. April Lipke

  • I bought some organic bananas but they say on the packet they have only been sprayed with safe stuff so really they still sprayed:(

  • Sorry but onions are not grown under ground! And yes they are sprayed heaps and you forgot garlic. Both of these are sprayed in conventional production. They are a medicinal food.

  • Makes me so mad that these motherfuckers have us fucked either way. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. They know that we don’t want junk in our bodies, so when we decide we want organic fruits & veggies they contaminate THEM purposely to make us sick. These corporations can SUCK IT!

  • I was looking for organic orange peel videos and saw a video for injecting water melon, in Africa dunking oranges in dyes, and another off shore dunking pickles in a dye.

  • I throw whole kiwi fruit in to our smoothies, so always buy organic. The skins provide great fibre and you can be sure you are getting all the vitamins. Here in New Zealand, the home of kiwi fruit, most are heavily sprayed especially for export.

  • EWG’s Dirty Dozen for 2020
    Strawberries
    Spinach
    Kale
    Nectarines
    Apples
    Grapes
    Peaches
    Cherries
    Pears
    Tomatoes
    Celery
    Potatoes
    EWG’s Clean Fifteen for 2020
    Avocados
    Sweet corn
    Pineapple
    Onions
    Papaya
    Sweet peas (frozen)
    Eggplants
    Asparagus
    Cauliflower
    Cantaloupes
    Broccoli
    Mushrooms
    Cabbage
    Honeydew melon
    Kiwi

  • hoje tomei só suco na centrifuga e de almoço, banana com agua de coco e amora virou um açaí da hora, mas emagrecer que é bom nadaaaa…….

  • Hi Kristina, thank you for your video. However, organic doesn’t mean pesticide-free. I read several articles and studies about that. It means that in organic food the pesticides must be derived from natural sources, not synthetically manufactured. A real organic apple looks way less nicer than the ones you find in the supermarket. It has holes due to the bugs and it is much smaller. When you test synthetic chemicals (used in non-organic food) for their ability to cause cancer, you find that about half of them are carcinogenic.
    Until recently, nobody bothered to look at natural chemicals (such as organic pesticides), because it was assumed that they posed little risk. But when the studies were done, the results were somewhat shocking: you find that about half of the natural chemicals studied are carcinogenic as well. This is a case where everyone (consumers, farmers, researchers) made the same, dangerous mistake. We assumed that “natural” chemicals were automatically better and safer than synthetic materials, and we were wrong. It’s important that we become more prudent in our acceptance of “natural” as being innocuous and harmless. The purpose in writing this comment is not to discourage people from buying organic produce. It is only meant to let you know what you are or aren’t getting when you make such a purchase. Unless you know your grower personally, there is no guarantee that your produce has been grown without pesticides or other chemicals. It’s a point to consider, given the substantially higher cost of organic foods.

    Data that describes the carcinogenicity of natural and synthetic compounds are referenced in Gold, L.S., et al. (1992) Science Vol. 258, pp. 261-265.

  • I hope that you don’t eat potatos raw and you are not telling that to people. Am saying this even though i love that you are there.

  • I watched the entire video just to hear about broccoli and I get Organic 99% of the time.That sticker thing was very informative though.

  • My son manages the Produce Dept at a Safeway and he has to spray a “crisper” chemical on EVERYTHING including the Organic Produce!! I was shocked!

  • You can do a baking water, baking soda and white vinegar soak for 10 minutes, then rinse to remove a lot of pesticide from outer skin, and also from berries. Doesn’t impact flavor but helps clean up. I use even on organic berries as pesticides are difficult to remove from berries. Loutus used to make a machine that removed up to 90% of pesticides, but no longer sells it.

  • Hi Kristina, thank you for your video. However, ORGANIC DOESN’T MEAN PESTICIDE FREE. I read several researches and studies about that. It means that in organic food the pesticides must be derived from natural sources, not synthetically manufactured. A real organic apple looks way less nicer than the ones you find in the supermarket. It has holes due to the bugs and it is much smaller. When you test synthetic chemicals (used in non-organic food) for their ability to cause cancer, you find that about half of them are carcinogenic.
    Until recently, nobody bothered to look at natural chemicals (such as organic pesticides), because it was assumed that they posed little risk. But when the studies were done, the results were somewhat shocking: you find that about half of the natural chemicals studied are carcinogenic as well. This is a case where everyone (consumers, farmers, researchers) made the same, dangerous mistake. We assumed that “natural” chemicals were automatically better and safer than synthetic materials, and we were wrong. It’s important that we become more prudent in our acceptance of “natural” as being innocuous and harmless. The purpose in writing this comment is not to discourage people from buying organic produce. It is only meant to let you know what you are or aren’t getting when you make such a purchase. Unless you know your grower personally, there is no guarantee that your produce has been grown without pesticides or other chemicals. It’s a point to consider, given the substantially higher cost of organic foods.

    Data that describes the carcinogenicity of natural and synthetic compounds are referenced in Gold, L.S., et al. Science Vol. 258, pp. 261-265.

  • hi i am from Canada and when i was a child we had two acres of land and grew everything organic..no pesticides no chemicals even our apple andif y cherry trees had no sprays. it was awesome. i was never sick…i left home started eating junk food then i noticed my body changing and i gain weight had flus etc. so now i am growing veggies off of my balcony with organic seeds and soil and its amazing what you can grow off of your balcony in a appartment. but i use stainless steel or another non plastic container and i make lots of holes in the bottom of the can and add about two inches of clean rocks and then add my soil and plants which i grew inside first. or you can buy organic plants…tomatoes love a deep root system. so put only one plant in a tall 3 foot container. you need to learn how to do container gardening. i love the pole beans which freeze up good..so get a small deep freeze and have a couple of plants on the baloncy if you like peas as well. have fun learning…its the life god gave us way back in Eden and he plans to bring all that happiness back to good people again.
    back to eden..read psalms 37: 9, 10,11,29 Revelation 21: 3,4 Daniel 2: 44 and many more scriptures i could bring out that say that God’s plan has not change. soon his will to be done on earth is coming fast and you young people will see it. I just wrote this for people who believe in our heavenly father and his written word the bible. So best wishes to everyone, and start taking care of your body and LOL get down and get dirtly in the dirt and see what you can get growing in that good ole soil. one last thing MOTHER EARTH NEWS is a awesome magazine you can get…its beenb around for over 20 years, as it teaches you how to live off the land….bye

  • Please look into the sweet potato. It seems they have merged the sweet potato with a yam. Or altered them in some way. I grow my own sweet potatoes and don’t buy them. In the stores they tell you they are sweet potatoes but clearly they look like yams. Yams have pointed ends and are stringy in the texture. Sweet potatoes are sweeter then yams, more shaped like a regular potato, and no stringy texture. Let us know what you find. Thanks

  • Great coverage of the dirty 12 and clean 15, bravo. Only concern is that GMO outrage was debunked a while back…not really sure why he’s still harping on them. It negatively impacts his overall credibility.

  • Yasss! I’d love a farmers market episode. Can you hit up the Logan square & Lincoln square markets? I can’t wait. I always share your recommendations with my family & friends. Thanks for all the content you provide.

  • I have a question: when I buy conventional stuff, i have heard i should wash it. Do you know of the best method for washing conventional fruits and veggies to try and remove at least some of that pesticide?

  • gmo fruits and vegetables can still be coming from animals which is not vegan monsanto has an agenda called the codex system and his plan is to have a human reduction of us humans from 9 billion to 500 million by polluting our plants. the only way to be truly vegan is to buy organic fruits and vegetables

  • gmo fruits and vegetables can still be coming from animals which is not vegan monsanto has an agenda called the codex system and his plan is to have a human reduction of us humans from 9 billion to 500 million by polluting our plants. the only way to be truly vegan is to buy organic fruits and vegetables

  • Lots of misleading facts here but can’t be arsed to argue them, an honest tip though buy EU as much as possible as if it fails EU regulations it can’t even be sold outside EU and they have better legislation than US

  • You should do a video of GMOs in produce explained more. Also on the video you made at Walmart talking about GMOs you’re saying its pretty much safe to eat all the produce that’s not on the Dirty Dozen. So I could go buy any conventional produce at any store that is not on Dirty Dozen list right?

  • always eat healthy foods is that it will Pegasus it is on the same when I know about it so frozen yeah that’s what I’m thinking always need help always eat healthy food so just always eat healthy things that you can’t eat that much decided to have pesticides at all

  • I throw whole kiwi fruit in to our smoothies, so always buy organic. The skins provide great fibre and you can be sure you are getting all the vitamins. Here in New Zealand, the home of kiwi fruit, most are heavily sprayed especially for export.

  • What is your opinion on Greenhouse produce? Since it is sheltered away from bugs, do they need to spray it so much? Costco around Chicago has boxes 12×20 of locally greenhouse grown tomatoes. I buy them but are they good?

  • hi kristina, do you suggest peeling the skins off everything or are there def certain fruits and veggies you should keep the skin on?

  • Do you mind sharing the sources for the studies mentioned? I think this would be very helpful for those that are interested in the academic studies

  • I have a question: when I buy conventional stuff, i have heard i should wash it. Do you know of the best method for washing conventional fruits and veggies to try and remove at least some of that pesticide?

  • sorry but your miss informed, mango is one of the worst sprayed, here in australia the government has printed the pesticides used by mango growers, they still use DDT, one of the worst sprays

  • I use a Lemon & Vinegar wash on fresh fruits and vegetables I buy at the grocery store. I wonder if Dr. Weil recommends that. April Lipke

  • Thank you, I have always been a label reader, taught by my Mama. Now, however, I compare all ingredients on my canned foods, snacks, and drinks. On my fresh veggies and fruits, it’s bargains only. Lol. Nowadays I am interested in non dairy ice creams, cheeses, eggs Happy to see Breyers, a family favorite has non dairy ice creams. You and your crew are doing a nice job.

  • Please look into the sweet potato. It seems they have merged the sweet potato with a yam. Or altered them in some way. I grow my own sweet potatoes and don’t buy them. In the stores they tell you they are sweet potatoes but clearly they look like yams. Yams have pointed ends and are stringy in the texture. Sweet potatoes are sweeter then yams, more shaped like a regular potato, and no stringy texture. Let us know what you find. Thanks

  • Sorry but onions are not grown under ground! And yes they are sprayed heaps and you forgot garlic. Both of these are sprayed in conventional production. They are a medicinal food.

  • How did I get here? I have no idea… But this must be some awful bullshit. I have never found any evidence that organic fruits and vegetables are any nutritionally different than conventional produce. Furthermore, organic produce may be sprayed with “natural pesticides” instead of man-made pesticides. Just because something is natural doesn’t mean that is safe or safer than man-made pesticides. The pesticide residue is extremely low anyway. If you are so concerned, then you might as well just wear no make up. I bet there are more toxins in makeup than the food on your plate.

  • hello everyone i want to know that sweet fruits such as jackfruit or durain can make us fat? and how about frutose content in the fruits harm our body like sugar?

  • Hi Kristina, thank you for your video. However, ORGANIC DOESN’T MEAN PESTICIDE FREE. I read several researches and studies about that. It means that in organic food the pesticides must be derived from natural sources, not synthetically manufactured. A real organic apple looks way less nicer than the ones you find in the supermarket. It has holes due to the bugs and it is much smaller. When you test synthetic chemicals (used in non-organic food) for their ability to cause cancer, you find that about half of them are carcinogenic.
    Until recently, nobody bothered to look at natural chemicals (such as organic pesticides), because it was assumed that they posed little risk. But when the studies were done, the results were somewhat shocking: you find that about half of the natural chemicals studied are carcinogenic as well. This is a case where everyone (consumers, farmers, researchers) made the same, dangerous mistake. We assumed that “natural” chemicals were automatically better and safer than synthetic materials, and we were wrong. It’s important that we become more prudent in our acceptance of “natural” as being innocuous and harmless. The purpose in writing this comment is not to discourage people from buying organic produce. It is only meant to let you know what you are or aren’t getting when you make such a purchase. Unless you know your grower personally, there is no guarantee that your produce has been grown without pesticides or other chemicals. It’s a point to consider, given the substantially higher cost of organic foods.

    Data that describes the carcinogenicity of natural and synthetic compounds are referenced in Gold, L.S., et al. Science Vol. 258, pp. 261-265.

  • With July 4th approaching, would love to see video with hot dog, hamburger ( with buns/wraps) recommendations as well as baked beans and various side dishes. You’ve so inspired me to eat clean and healthy.

  • Lots of misleading facts here but can’t be arsed to argue them, an honest tip though buy EU as much as possible as if it fails EU regulations it can’t even be sold outside EU and they have better legislation than US

  • I would put strawberry’s in the #1 position to only buy organic. The conventional’s are so irradiated they are very toxic. They get inside the berry itself so washing the outside won’t do much good. I either buy Organic Strawberry’s when on sale or i eat none at all

  • Nice video. I’m still on the fence as both my parents are 78 years old and never ate organic or any of these methods and are in good health.

  • YES broccoli and cabbage are two of my favorite veggies, especially broccoli but still buy organic unless no choice so good to know.

  • Organic kale at Smart & Final $1.29 a bunch sometimes$1.49 a bunch. It is consistently$0.20 cheaper a bunch than non-organic kale.

  • Be informed about what kinds of products are used by organic farmers. Many people like to purchase organic produce because they believe that it has not been sprayed with pesticides. This is not a correct assumption. The fact is most organic fruits and vegetables have been sprayed, but with different products.

  • Sad to break up to everyone but doesn’t matter if is organic especially if you go to places where there is always always sale alot veggies sold by farmers lots of people are taking the farmers credit their is actually a news reporter that cought this and their is a bunch a reviews that now is fake reviews so yeah sad but true people all true we have been lied to.

  • Makes me so mad that these motherfuckers have us fucked either way. Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. They know that we don’t want junk in our bodies, so when we decide we want organic fruits & veggies they contaminate THEM purposely to make us sick. These corporations can SUCK IT!

  • Nice video. I’m still on the fence as both my parents are 78 years old and never ate organic or any of these methods and are in good health.

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.
    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.
    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.
    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director
    Alliance for Food and Farming
    https://www. safefruitsandveggies. com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Can you come to the UK & do some episodes here pretty please? I’m so jealous of how big your health food stores are over there & all the products you mention that are good in the shops, I cannot purchase them here & I get so disappointed! Lol. I know some people in the UK would love it, we have far less options in our stores here unfortunately so can be difficult to know what to purchase, we also have tiny health stores. Thanks in advance, Jessica.

  • Just wanna let you know that my health teacher showed us this video and we all groaned when you said the puns. Very informative, though.

  • Environmental Working Group’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ produce list stokes pesticide fears in an ‘already anxiety-ridden world’ An open letter to Mr. Ken Cook, President
    Environmental Working Group

    Your announced plan to release the so-called “Dirty Dozen” list under current circumstances is misguided and concerning. As you are well aware, this list is not only scientifically unsupportable but peer reviewed research has shown it negatively impacts consumers and discourages consumption because it erroneously raises produce safety fears.

    On behalf of the organic and conventional farmers we represent, we ask that you rethink your decision to release and promote this list due to its undermining effect on health efforts to increase consumption of the very foods we are urged to eat more of to boost immunity and prevent illness. Now is not the time to release more inaccurate and fear-based messaging into an already anxiety-ridden world.

    In addition, your list has been repeatedly discredited by scientists. A peer reviewed analysis has shown that your organization follows no established scientific procedures in the development of the so-called list. Moreover, this analysis found that your list’s recommendations to substitute organic forms of produce for conventional forms does not reduce risk to consumers simply because residues are so low, if present at all, on conventional fruits and vegetables.

    Further, calling fruits and vegetables “dirty” is exceptionally disrespectful to organic and conventional fruit and vegetable farmers. These are the farmers who continue to work hard every day to ensure Americans (as well as citizens in other countries) have an adequate and accessible supply of food in these very troubling and uncertain times. It should be noted that the government has deemed farmers and farm employees as “essential” to our nation’s security – something most of us have recognized for a long long time.

    Mr. Cook, we all must adapt to this evolving environment, make difficult decisions and change. We have called on you previously to abandon releasing this list. But, now more than ever, we ask for your leadership to stop your organization’s practice of knowingly stoking misplaced food safety fears and denigrating the work of farmers through the release of this list. Now is the time to put consumers first and support their choices whether they choose organic or conventionally grown produce. Now is the time to use your organization’s considerable resources to help promote a healthy diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables. With only one in 10 Americans eating enough each day, the EWG could help make positive and important strides in improving diets. Please, do the right thing.

    Teresa Thorne, Executive Director

    Alliance for Food and Farming

    #NoMoreDirtyDozen, #FactsNotFears, #EatMoreProduce

    https://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/blog/an-open-letter-to-ewg/

  • Organic Vegetables are not vegan
    -Organic Fertilizers can Include manure
    -Manure comes from factory animals
    -Therefore Organic produce is not vegan

  • How did I get here? I have no idea… But this must be some awful bullshit. I have never found any evidence that organic fruits and vegetables are any nutritionally different than conventional produce. Furthermore, organic produce may be sprayed with “natural pesticides” instead of man-made pesticides. Just because something is natural doesn’t mean that is safe or safer than man-made pesticides. The pesticide residue is extremely low anyway. If you are so concerned, then you might as well just wear no make up. I bet there are more toxins in makeup than the food on your plate.

  • hoje tomei só suco na centrifuga e de almoço, banana com agua de coco e amora virou um açaí da hora, mas emagrecer que é bom nadaaaa…….

  • Bobbyquestion. What if a wash my produce like cherries, grapes, apples in a baking-soda vinegar wash. Will that remove pesticides?

  • So glad we have had our own garden for years. Bobby you have given me so many more things to think about and look for at the grocery store. So glad I found your channel.

  • One day Rose is gonna be like “I got this daddy” & push Bobby out of the way to finish cooking & he’s gonna be like “Uh ok?” Also Fiji apple is my favorite they’re nice & crisp & they’re not sour I hate mealy apples.

  • I watched the entire video just to hear about broccoli and I get Organic 99% of the time.That sticker thing was very informative though.

  • Hi there! I am kind of new. I discovered your videos like three weeks ago, so I am trying to catch up! I do enjoy your videos, thank you for doing what you do �� wondering about cucumber �� and jicama, do they need to be organic?

  • I find that lists like these are a bit over-simplified; I’d rather know which produce has more than “x” amount of pesticides in them. Number 14 on the list might have ten times the toxic load as 15 and so on. I’ve looked for this information but without success.

  • Just wanna let you know that my health teacher showed us this video and we all groaned when you said the puns. Very informative, though.

  • Thank you so much for educating us on where we need to buy organic and where we don’t ����. Taking a screen shot of the list so I have it with me when I shop ��
    What about bananas �� They have a skin but seem so perishable? Thank you ����

  • I’m jus so Happy that I find you!! I have learned so much and started to change things in my house lill by lill!! Thank you for shearing your knowledge!!

  • 1:37 you picked up a strawberry and Rose tried to take it from your hand, when you didn’t give to her, she got grumpers, hahahah so precious!

  • Hey there so I bought some organic strawberries from cosco and 2 days later they were mushy how do you wash and keep your strawberries? Can you please do a dairy free haul, We just found out that my daughter is lactose intolerant. Thank you so so much for all you do also just got your cookbook it’s great

  • sorry but your miss informed, mango is one of the worst sprayed, here in australia the government has printed the pesticides used by mango growers, they still use DDT, one of the worst sprays

  • You always say down below. You can find this so you can find that down below. I never see anything down below. I can never find anything down below. So I have incomplete information.

  • Hi BOBBIE And Miss Rose ��!!!!!! Love Love Love your wonderful videos!!!!!! Being a senior
    Person……… I am so great full for your endless knowledge!!!!! Please keep me INFORMED!!

  • Hey guys, #SundayFunday �� It’s 93’ here in Dania Beach, but feels like 103’�� This list really helps me remember what fruits & vegys to buy organic. I especially love strawberries ���� yes please do a farmers market review! ❤️✌��