Sports Nutritionist-Approved Pre-Workout Toasts

 

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Sports Nutritionist-Approved Pre-Workout Toasts. by Lori Russell, MS RD CSSD. August 24, 2018. No Comments. When deciding what to eat before a workout, many things come to mind: oatmeal, bananas, smoothies and bagels. While those standards are fine, it might be time to take your pre-workout fueling game up a level with toast.

Don’t settle for tired, pre-workout avocado toast. Up your toast game with these three MyFitnessPal-approved, protein-packed toast variations. #MyFitnessPal #avocadotoast. I spoke with Dr.

Christine Rosenbloom, RD, CSSD, a professor emerita of nutrition at Georgia State University and sports dietitian for Georgia State athletes, and she agreed. “A good pre-workout snack depends on how close to the exercise bout you plan to eat and the exercise intensity and duration. Pre-workout snacks aren’t just for adults. Sports nutrition for young athletes is equally as important – if not more so. Why?

Poor eating habits can lead to nutrient deficiencies, which can affect your child’s healthy development, academic performance as well as their ability to excel in their favorite sport. Before Practice. Plan to eat foods low in fat and moderate in protein and fiber 2-4 hours before practice. Eat a bigger breakfast — double up on wheat toast, oatmeal or yogurt to take a little pressure off lunch. Like your pre-workout snack, go for one with carbs and protein that provides 150 to 200 calories.

Some healthy and on-the-go snack choices include: Trail mix; Bread with nut butter; Cheese and crackers; Hummus and pitta bread; Be sensible. Having a. A veggie omelet with toast “If you like to workout in the morning, go ahead and eat your breakfast first. Eggs make a great pre-workout snack. Are protein powders, pre-workout drinks, and other supplements like these beneficial for you?

For the average person who may or may not lift weights, protein powders are not beneficial and costly. Same for pre-workout drinks. Drink 1 cup of water before you work out and drink at least 1 cup of water during workouts in ho. Nutritionist-Approved Snack Bars for Your Gym Bag.

Is your favorite snack bar basically a candy bar? These bars are better! This bar is high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fiber. Could possibly be a pre-workout snack as it provides enough calories to thrive any cardio class, let it be spin class, zumba, or one-hour run on treadmill. About 2 to 3 hours before playing sports, eat a meal that is rich in carbohydrate, low in fat and fairly low in protein and fibre for quick digestion.

Here are some examples: Peanut butter and honey or jam on toast and glass of skim milk. Fruit and yogurt smoothie and a.

List of related literature:

Energy bars, drinks, or gels may be convenient during an endurance event; enjoy a carbohydrate-protein combination food afterward, such as low-fat chocolate milk or a fruity yogurt.

“American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, Revised and Updated 4th Edition” by Roberta Larson Duyff
from American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, Revised and Updated 4th Edition
by Roberta Larson Duyff
HMH Books, 2012

Finally, for athletes engaged in intense training periods and/or wanting to maximize protein synthesis, we recommend that they consume a light meal and/or MRP or RTD that contains 30–40 grams of carbohydrate with 20–30 grams of protein (primarily casein) before they go to bed.

“Essentials of Exercise & Sport Nutrition: Science to Practice” by Richard B. Kreider PhD FACSM FISSN FNAK
from Essentials of Exercise & Sport Nutrition: Science to Practice
by Richard B. Kreider PhD FACSM FISSN FNAK
Lulu Publishing Services, 2019

carbohydrate with a lower osmolar effect.80 This holds real promise for athletes involved in high-endurance sports (e.g., marathon, ultramarathon, triathlon, Ironman, Tour de France) where the energy requirement is far higher than could easily be provided with typical 6 to 7 percent carbohydrate sports beverages.

“Advanced Sports Nutrition” by Dan Benardot
from Advanced Sports Nutrition
by Dan Benardot
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2011

While the majority of these products are not supported by robust evidence, there are five (caffeine, creatine, nitrate/beetroot juice, beta-alanine and bicarbonate) which may contribute to performance gains, according to the event, the specific scenario of use and the individual athlete’s response [74].

“Triathlon Medicine” by Sergio Migliorini
from Triathlon Medicine
by Sergio Migliorini
Springer International Publishing, 2019

For example, we have seen people use an “if it fits your macros” approach and consume 144 grams of fat in the form of butter and/or MCT oil in their coffee, drink 100 to 150 grams of protein in the form of pure protein shakes, and then finish the night off with 25 to 50 grams of carbohydrates from a package of M&Ms.

“The Ketogenic Bible: The Authoritative Guide to Ketosis” by Jacob Wilson, Ryan Lowery
from The Ketogenic Bible: The Authoritative Guide to Ketosis
by Jacob Wilson, Ryan Lowery
Victory Belt Publishing, 2017

If you are a coach, you might talk with your athletes about optimal pre-workout and post-workout meals or use researchbased methods to discuss which foods and drinks to avoid during the competition season (for national standards relating to nutrition in physical education and coaching, see table 6.4).

“Technology for Physical Educators, Health Educators, and Coaches: Enhancing Instruction, Assessment, Management, Professional Development, and Advocacy” by Seth E. Jenny, Jennifer M. Krause, Tess Armstrong
from Technology for Physical Educators, Health Educators, and Coaches: Enhancing Instruction, Assessment, Management, Professional Development, and Advocacy
by Seth E. Jenny, Jennifer M. Krause, Tess Armstrong
Human Kinetics, 2020

A carbohydrate drink or powder made of complex carbohydrate such as corn or maltodextrin is ideal for a preworkout drink as long as you have enough time to digest it properly.

“Natural Bodybuilding” by John Hansen
from Natural Bodybuilding
by John Hansen
Human Kinetics, 2005

Real life includes 1) multiday tournaments, competitions, or events, 2) “stacking” supplements (such as mixing caffeine and nitrates), and 3) determining whether an elite athlete responds the same way to a supplement as does a recreational athlete.

“Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook” by Nancy Clark
from Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook
by Nancy Clark
Human Kinetics, 2019

Sports drinks must be differentiated from “energy drinks,” which typically include nonnutritive stimulants such as caffeine, guarana, taurine, ginseng, carnitine, creatine, and/or glucuoronolactone, with varying amounts of carbohydrate, protein, amino acids, vitamins, sodium, and other minerals.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

An optimal post-workout meal aimed to potentiate exercise benefits could include 1.2–1.5 g/kg of high-glycemic load carbohydrates with 50–150 mg/kg of EAA or 115–300 mg/kg highquality whey protein [64].

“The Active Female: Health Issues Throughout the Lifespan” by Jacalyn J. RobertMcComb, Reid L. Norman, Mimi Zumwalt
from The Active Female: Health Issues Throughout the Lifespan
by Jacalyn J. RobertMcComb, Reid L. Norman, Mimi Zumwalt
Springer New York, 2014

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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36 comments

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  • What should people eat that don’t do keto? Like my 78 year old Mom…knowing she will never be keto. Is low carb and real nigh fat still better then just traditional diet? Carb, pufas,

  • Thank you for your video….  Trying to figure out what works for me is so tough, I am a Gastric Bypass (RNY) Runner.  My stomach is the size of an Egg, so trying to fuel is so challenging…

  • I have recently read that many triathletes and long distance runners do not take in carbs during sessions of less than 3 hours during training, in order to increase their ability to use fat as fuel during races. Have you heard this, and if so, what is your opinion of that? Thanks for the great videos.

  • I take creatine, BCAA’s, beta alanine, multivitamins, citruline malite, and fish oils daily! They help from what i’ve noticed, and have been a good way to kick my need for caffeine to stimulate and motive my workout!

  • I want to try that too fit. But maybe just buying the beta Alanine pills is better? Since you can get in a store and not order online + thats basically the main ingredient anyway that you want. Good idea?? They only give you a few servings if you buy that stuff online and costs more, so beta alanine might be the best it cost 30 on GNC for 120 capsules, 1 serving is 3 capsules, so 40 servings per container, compared to the too fit that gives you the pre work-out formula of “20 servings” not sure if thats 60 pills? For 55 dollars. Well.. what ya think?

  • Thanks guys!
    Btw, I am 13 years old and have a 6:43 pr in the mile. Are there any tips you have to improve that for my 8th grade year?

  • Taste is indeed pretty artificial but it is okay once used to it. It works nicely. I do not know what makes it work so well but it definitely beats an sizeable amount of mugs of self brewed coffee even if the caffeine content is less. It is not the creatine or carnitine as I can take that separately and it doesn’t work the same. Anyway, yeah, there is something helping in focus and learning as well in it. My wife and myself use it for that purpose too when we are too down to study. 30 minutes later, magic!

  • I just have coffee, a banana and a few goji berries.
    The one advantage I would definitely get from pre-made supplements (if I bought them) is that once I take it I know I’ll workout. I’m too cheap to take this stuff and then sit around.

  • Another way of arguing for the use of fish oil or other omega-3 fats is to show a correlation between disease and a decreased amount of EPA, DHA, or arachidonic acid in the tissues, and to say “these oils are deficient, the disease is caused by a deficiency of essential fatty acids.” Those oils are extremely susceptible to oxidation, so they tend to spontaneously disappear in response to tissue injury, cellular excitation, the increased energy demands of stress, exposure to toxins or ionizing radiation, or even exposure to light. That spontaneous oxidation is what made them useful as varnish or paint medium. But it is what makes them sensitize the tissues to injury. Their “deficiency” in the tissues frequently corresponds to the intensity of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation; it is usually their presence, rather than their deficiency, that created the disposition for the disease.

  • Thanks Coach Elizabeth, I don’t use pre workout supplements, but I have just started drinking Matcha green tea, I will see how that will help me out for that caffeine kick without coffee. Thanks again.

  • I’m 16 should I take this preworkout, I go to school then directly to work and get home tired, so I take this and it helps me. But i don’t know if I should take this for my age

  • Thanks for the advice. Are there any studies showing what kind of nutrition & supplementation can help with in-game/post-game cramps?

  • I take creatine, BCAA’s, beta alanine, multivitamins, citruline malite, and fish oils daily! They help from what i’ve noticed, and have been a good way to kick my need for caffeine to stimulate and motive my workout!

  • Hello Coach Elizabeth thanks for the info �� Just discovered the little packed goodness of olives and the benefits. Have a great weekend see you at Park Run tomorrow?

  • I like how i can find ON anywhere if i run out of my usually stuff i can always find ON at most stores which i like i wish they would change there Whey gold standard a bit though like NO ion exchange whey protein and NO ACE K i think they would sell alot more if they made those 2 easy changes but as a brand they are deff good!

  • coffee and grapefruit seems like diarrhea waiting to happen. With that said, these pre-workout supplements and supplements in general are not approved by the FDA so the fillers can be scary to consume. You said it, Sunshine, knowledge and rest are your best all natural pre-workout remedies.

  • Thanks Coach Elizabeth, I don’t use pre workout supplements, but I have just started drinking Matcha green tea, I will see how that will help me out for that caffeine kick without coffee. Thanks again.

  • My opinion is high stim pre work outs are not good for running unless it’s a sprint day or reapeats. For distance or zone 2 work outs I found it pretty hard to control your heart rate. I have a good tolerance for caffiene & it’s still never a good idea unless I’m doing sprints. I’ve worked in the supplement industry & Pre’s are generally for lifting days or something that requires short bursts of energy. Anyone running & using high stim prework outs I bet if you ran with out it you’d notice your heart rate is more controlled & the runs less taxing!!! Just my exprience!

  • The original “essential fatty acids” were linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids. Now that the toxic effects of those are coming to be recognized, new “essential fatty acids,” the omega-3 fatty acids, including those with long chains, found in fish oils, are said to make babies more intelligent, to be necessary for good vision, and to prevent cancer, heart disease, obesity, arthritis, depression, epilepsy, psychosis, dementia, ulcers, eczema and dry skin.

    With just a normal amount of vitamin E in the diet, cod liver oil is certain to be highly oxidized in the tissues of a mammal that eats a lot of it, and an experiment with dogs showed that it could increase their cancer mortality from the normal 5% to 100%. Although fish oils rapidly destroy vitamin E in the body, some of them, especially the liver oils, can provide useful vitamins, A and D. In studies comparing fish oil diets with standard diets, these nutrients, as well as any toxins besides fatty acids (Huang, et al., 1997; Miyazaki, et al., 1998) in either type of oil, should be taken into account, but they seldom are.

  • Thank you for your video….  Trying to figure out what works for me is so tough, I am a Gastric Bypass (RNY) Runner.  My stomach is the size of an Egg, so trying to fuel is so challenging…

  • Thanks guys!
    Btw, I am 13 years old and have a 6:43 pr in the mile. Are there any tips you have to improve that for my 8th grade year?

  • I want to try that too fit. But maybe just buying the beta Alanine pills is better? Since you can get in a store and not order online + thats basically the main ingredient anyway that you want. Good idea?? They only give you a few servings if you buy that stuff online and costs more, so beta alanine might be the best it cost 30 on GNC for 120 capsules, 1 serving is 3 capsules, so 40 servings per container, compared to the too fit that gives you the pre work-out formula of “20 servings” not sure if thats 60 pills? For 55 dollars. Well.. what ya think?

  • Thanks for the advice. Are there any studies showing what kind of nutrition & supplementation can help with in-game/post-game cramps?

  • One of the earliest harmful effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids, PUFA, to be observed was their acceleration of the formation of lipofuscin or ceroid, the “age pigment,” during oxidative stress or vitamin E deficiency. Associated with the formation of lipofuscin, the PUFA were discovered to cause degeneration of the gonads and brain, and the fact that vitamin E could prevent some of their toxic effects led to the idea that vitamin E was essentially an antioxidant. Unfortunately, the protective effect of vitamin E against the PUFA is only partial (Allard, et al., 1997).

  • coffee and grapefruit seems like diarrhea waiting to happen. With that said, these pre-workout supplements and supplements in general are not approved by the FDA so the fillers can be scary to consume. You said it, Sunshine, knowledge and rest are your best all natural pre-workout remedies.

  • Thanks for all the info! Might also be worth mentioning that BCAAs are only useful in conjunction with all of the other essential amino acids, and that if you’re consuming any kind of complete protein it includes BCAAs making the supplement pretty redundant.

  • Taste is indeed pretty artificial but it is okay once used to it. It works nicely. I do not know what makes it work so well but it definitely beats an sizeable amount of mugs of self brewed coffee even if the caffeine content is less. It is not the creatine or carnitine as I can take that separately and it doesn’t work the same. Anyway, yeah, there is something helping in focus and learning as well in it. My wife and myself use it for that purpose too when we are too down to study. 30 minutes later, magic!

  • Hello Coach Elizabeth thanks for the info �� Just discovered the little packed goodness of olives and the benefits. Have a great weekend see you at Park Run tomorrow?

  • Interesting that this touched not at all on Macro pre-workout strategies. For folks living a Keto lifestyle, but utilizing Targeted Keto as a high-intensity strategy, it’d be beneficial to know Coach Elizabeth’s thoughts on evaluating carb expenditure levels per workout and how to strategically ingest carbs pre-workout.

  • I am learning so much from you for myself as well as my four young children, I don’t want them ever going through what I have because of my 80s and 90s childhood diet. Learning and healing. Hope you are feeling better!

  • My opinion is high stim pre work outs are not good for running unless it’s a sprint day or reapeats. For distance or zone 2 work outs I found it pretty hard to control your heart rate. I have a good tolerance for caffiene & it’s still never a good idea unless I’m doing sprints. I’ve worked in the supplement industry & Pre’s are generally for lifting days or something that requires short bursts of energy. Anyone running & using high stim prework outs I bet if you ran with out it you’d notice your heart rate is more controlled & the runs less taxing!!! Just my exprience!

  • You are very beautiful woman you show how fit you are to show keto you can have a firm body you shouldn’t be hiding it you husband is a lucky guy

  • Greath show very informative.Congratulations to you and your team. My index is great, thanks to Greenpasture fermented cod liver supplement, pastured eggs and meat I luckily have access to at neighborhood farms in Quebec province a little north of Vermont. God bless you and your family.

  • Nope, the mic is still saturating: just lower the gain. If you’re using Windows it’s in the sound settings.
    Thanks for the video. Your ratio is 39, not bad:)

  • I just have coffee, a banana and a few goji berries.
    The one advantage I would definitely get from pre-made supplements (if I bought them) is that once I take it I know I’ll workout. I’m too cheap to take this stuff and then sit around.

  • By far your most educational talk. I don’t say hi normally but I live in Santa Cruz i am 71 and I’ve been on keto for 2.5 yrs. Given your book to many. Thanks