Sports Diet Tips about Fueling Cold-Weather Training

 

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FUEL for RUNNING LONG DISTANCE when MARATHON TRAINING! DON’T hit the WALL!!

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Nutrition tips for winter sports athletes

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Sports Nutrition: Fueling Your Best Performance

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How To Fuel For An Ultramarathon?

Video taken from the channel: The Run Experience


 

FUEL for RUNNING LONG DISTANCE when MARATHON TRAINING! DON’T hit the WALL!!

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How to Properly Fuel Your Body for Peak Performance | Nutrition for Athletes

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Nutrition tips for winter sports athletes

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Sports Nutrition: Fueling Your Best Performance

Video taken from the channel: Cioffredi & Associates Physical Therapy


Cold weather can be a great thing for fueling workouts; you can bring more variety of whole foods along (sandwiches, chocolate) without risking spoilage or messy melting! This is great for taste buds and nutrient variety. These tips can to help you fuel wisely for cold weather workouts. If you take time off from soccer to enjoy winter sports, you want to pay careful attention to your sports diet. Otherwise, lack of food and fluids can take the fun out of your outdoor activities.

To keep your glycogen (which is what glucose stored in the muscles is called) stores topped off on your long, cold runs, consume 25 to 30 grams of carbs (gels, chews, sports drink) every 30 to 45. This item: Plant-Based Sports Nutrition: Expert fueling strategies for training, recovery, and performance by D. Enette Larson-Meyer Paperback $17.79. Don’t Neglect Sodium Rich Foods.

Sodium rich foods can be a performance saver prior to competition or hard training. Foods like pretzels, soup, or just simply adding salt to your oatmeal are easy ways to add more sodium. Nutrition Tip #4. Examples include leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli and cabbage), beans and high-fiber bars and cereals.

Of course, you may discover other foods upset your stomach while running that aren’t high in fiber. If so, make a mental note to avoid those before long runs as well. Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition.

Eat well to play well with facts sheets that discuss eating on the road, vegetarian eating for athletes, fueling during exercise and for recovery, eating frequency, and more. Read these 7 rule and get tips on what to eat and drink. 7 Rules for Refueling after a Tournament or Competition After working hard during a tournament or competition, it’s important refuel. In order for professional athletes to maintain their rigorous training programs, they need to fuel their bodies correctly.

And their lean bodies definitely reflect how great their nutrition is. If you want to know the secret to a great diet that will keep you healthy and lean, check out these do’s and don’ts of a champion-inspired diet. If you are a winter athlete, you want to pay careful attention to your sports diet.

Otherwise, lack of food and fluids can take the fun out of your outdoor activities. These tips can help you fuel wisely for cold weather workouts. Winter Hydration Tips.

List of related literature:

Endurance athletes who train in cold weather can practice a few warming strategies to keep the fluids flowing.

“Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.” by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
from Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.
by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
VeloPress, 2012

Training in hot weather increases hydration needs; therefore, plenty of liquids with electrolytes and nutritional food should be made available.

“Tactical Medicine Essentials” by Acep, American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP),, E. John Wipfler III, John E. Campbell, Lawrence E. Heiskell
from Tactical Medicine Essentials
by Acep, American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP),, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

When the weather first becomes hot, individuals should begin working or exercising outdoors at a reduced intensity, then gradually increase the intensity over a 2-week period to become acclimatized, that is, physically adjusted to the extreme temperature change.

“Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
from Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005

These tips can help you fuel wisely for cold-weather workouts.

“Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook” by Nancy Clark
from Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook
by Nancy Clark
Human Kinetics, 2019

Here are a few tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: • Coaches, trainers, and athletes themselves need to be well informed of the risks and hydration needs of working out in a hot, humid environment.

“Sports Nutrition for Health Professionals” by Natalie Digate Muth, Michelle Murphy Zive
from Sports Nutrition for Health Professionals
by Natalie Digate Muth, Michelle Murphy Zive
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

Acclimate to running in heat by doing some of your training runs during the hottest parts of the day, making sure to experiment with your fluid and nutrition intake to find out what works.

“Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance” by Jason Koop, Jim Rutberg
from Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance
by Jason Koop, Jim Rutberg
VeloPress, 2016

Though it may not be feasible for each team to weigh before and after each training Session, implementing this system during early, hot seasons (for example, two-a-day practices during fall American football, volleyball, cross-country, or soccer) helps prevent dehydration and heat illness.

“Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning” by Thomas R. Baechle, Roger W. Earle, National Strength & Conditioning Association (U.S.)
from Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning
by Thomas R. Baechle, Roger W. Earle, National Strength & Conditioning Association (U.S.)
Human Kinetics, 2008

Consistent with guidelines from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), to reduce the risk for heat illness, high school athletic programs should implement heat-acclimatization guidelines (eg, set limits on summer practice duration and intensity).

“Advanced First Aid, CPR, and AED” by Alton L. Thygerson, Steven M. Thygerson, Howard K. Mell
from Advanced First Aid, CPR, and AED
by Alton L. Thygerson, Steven M. Thygerson, Howard K. Mell
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

That’s a good reason why sloppy weather and frigid temperatures are probably an advantage for training.

“The Cyclist's Training Bible” by Joe Friel
from The Cyclist’s Training Bible
by Joe Friel
VeloPress, 2012

Further confounding the controversy regarding the benefits of warm-up was a study by Strickler et al. (1990) investigating the effects of passive warming on biomechanical properties of the musculotendinous unit of rabbit hindlimbs heated to 35° C (95°F) and 39°C (102°F) and then subjected to controlled strain injury.

“Science of Flexibility” by Michael J. Alter
from Science of Flexibility
by Michael J. Alter
Human Kinetics, 2004

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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  • Nate & The Run experience. Please ask Ucan to come out with a isotonic running gel with electrolytes Thank you! Happy Running and happy trails be safe.: )

  • Gu Vanilla Bean is the only flavor that tastes good to me AND sits easy on my stomach. (I’ve tried some other Gu flavors and they range from bad to awful 😉 The small amount of caffeine adds a bit of a boost too. Some of the Cliff Blocks also taste fairly good and seem to digest well.

  • You’re much less likely to HIT THE WALL AS HARD if you’re FAT ADAPTED ( the process of training the body to BURN FAT MORE EFFICIENTLY AND QUICKLY). This is achieved through PRACTICING RUNNING IN A FASTED STATE. Fewer CARBS leads to LESS INFLAMMATION. Consuming a higher ( 65 percent ) of one’s diet consisting of high quality fats will improve an individual’s overall health in my opinion. If only because you’re not as exposed to insulin which in large quantity is TOXIC.

  • If you train with gels during multiple long runs each week are you risking the efficiency of your carbohydrate stores on race day?

  • Thanks, but i am having a few questions: I am always reading/hearing that training is to give the body a stimulus for adopting to a new situation. This is basically what makes you run farther, makes you faster and so on. So wouldn’t you want to hit the wall in training (at least a few times), so your body will adapt and get better at fat-fueling instead that it knows it can expect carbs for short energy after 30/45 minutes and in regular intervals?
    If you “train” hitting the wall (i.e run in the morning before breakfast, when you’re already low on glycogen, so that you don’t have to run 20 miles, but only maybe half), wouldn’t you hit it at a later distance the next long run? And even later after that?.. and so on? And once it’s pushed out enough the odds of hitting the wall during the race would be minimal as your body is just much better in fat-fueling, especially if you then actually do add some carbs in form of gels as you’ll just be extra energised?
    I also know that there are the muscle-glycogen stores (hitting the wall unable to move the legs) and the liver glycogen stores (which fuels the brain, hence the bonking/feeling dizzy effect if they are depleted), so that should be separated. To my understanding the liver has the ability to store much less glycogen and once it’s in the muscles it can’t be released anymore to the rest of the body (i.e back to the liver). If you haven’t trained the body on being more efficient at fat-burning, i assume the gels need to replenish both, liver and muscle-stores, whereas when the body burns fat better, you’d basically reload more of the liver glycogen-storage, and stay “sharper/clearer” mentally, as the muscle-storage will still be fuller? And the less stores you need to refill, the less gels/energy drinks you require to actually take with you?

  • What works for me: I usually run fasted, with no fuelling during the run up to 3 hours. I will be well hydrated before, but will stop drinking 1 hour prior. On a warm day I might take some water along. On my last (2.59) marathon I carried a 200g squeezy bottle of honey with a little squeeze just before each water station. Works very well for me.

  • Thanks, but i am having a few questions: I am always reading/hearing that training is to give the body a stimulus for adopting to a new situation. This is basically what makes you run farther, makes you faster and so on. So wouldn’t you want to hit the wall in training (at least a few times), so your body will adapt and get better at fat-fueling instead that it knows it can expect carbs for short energy after 30/45 minutes and in regular intervals?
    If you “train” hitting the wall (i.e run in the morning before breakfast, when you’re already low on glycogen, so that you don’t have to run 20 miles, but only maybe half), wouldn’t you hit it at a later distance the next long run? And even later after that?.. and so on? And once it’s pushed out enough the odds of hitting the wall during the race would be minimal as your body is just much better in fat-fueling, especially if you then actually do add some carbs in form of gels as you’ll just be extra energised?
    I also know that there are the muscle-glycogen stores (hitting the wall unable to move the legs) and the liver glycogen stores (which fuels the brain, hence the bonking/feeling dizzy effect if they are depleted), so that should be separated. To my understanding the liver has the ability to store much less glycogen and once it’s in the muscles it can’t be released anymore to the rest of the body (i.e back to the liver). If you haven’t trained the body on being more efficient at fat-burning, i assume the gels need to replenish both, liver and muscle-stores, whereas when the body burns fat better, you’d basically reload more of the liver glycogen-storage, and stay “sharper/clearer” mentally, as the muscle-storage will still be fuller? And the less stores you need to refill, the less gels/energy drinks you require to actually take with you?

  • i use sponser gel and competition drinks. gel is very good on fat basic macadamia cocos… prompt energy. https://www.sponser.de/de_en/liquid-energy-ultra.html

  • Have you tried the brand Rawvelo? They’re plant based and their gels taste so much more natural than SIS, and a lot less clarty than gu gels.

  • I do my 23km tempo on a Thursday fasted. I do my 35km Sunday long run practicing race day nutrition. During marathon I consume a Maurten drink before the start. SiS gel every 6km. Salt tablet every 12km. This seems to work work great for me.

  • Ok I agree with all you said but I would like to remind everyone that eating gels WILL NOT let you avoid the wall if you don’t teach your body to use fats during training. And the only way to do it is to log EASY miles (I would say at least 50-60 miles/80-100 km per week, AT LEAST) for several weeks in a row during in your training. This is far more important than taking gels with you. Without training (fat burning adaptation) the wall will be inevitable for everyone:)

  • For water you can always just stopping at a pub and ask for some tapwater I did this a lot during marathon training around London and found landlords to always be very supportive especially if you’re wearing a charity vest!!

  • Ben care to comment on Tim Noakes research ref fueling he was the one who started the carb loading craze but later admitted that its a terrible thing to do as an athlete..
    Yes hit the wall if you are carb burner if you are fat adopted this does not happen as the body will use both fuel sources but mostly FAT which we have plenty of on us

  • The new Mountain Fuel flapjacks are by far the nicest thing I’ve eaten on a long fell race, the ginger one especially. Their jellies go down a lot easier than gels as well. I also make my own snacks of oats, chopped dates, dark chocolate and peanut butter and a drop of honey rolled into balls for longer races

  • Another great video, Ben! Cheers!

    I have a 100k race coming up (Race to the Stones my first ultra) and have a question for you re fuelling for those kind of longer distances specifically gel fuelling. I’m pretty at home with my gel fuelling strategy at marathon distance, but not quite got it nailed on for the ultra distances and wondered if you had any pearls of wisdom to share?

    I’ve tested eating solid foods to supplement any gels on my longer 50kish training runs, but was interested to know how you had gone about fuelling on the various 50k, 50miles, 100k, 100mile races you’ve done? Would you work on set timings to take gels/foods, like we would during a marathon or treat it differently/eat take a gel at every aid stop? Thanks in advance!

  • I have started running after seeing ur vedios my goal is 5k can I do it in 1 month preparation I need tips how should I plan.plzz reply

  • I rely on and like Clif Bloks a lot, but for longer runs (10+ miles) I like to get in some more real food sources. The Spring Energy gels you mentioned are great for me and I also really like Picky Bars. There are lots of tasty Picky Bar flavors, they’re compact, and about 200 calories each.

  • Could you explain how taking snacks like potato chips during a run does not cause stitch. Even when I drink water on my runs I get a side stitch…is it something I am doing wrong?

  • I envy folk who can eat and then run at pace gives me an upset stomach. I run early morning on nothing but half a pint of water and a Science in Sport gel.

  • I thought for your long slow runs in training you werent meant to fuel that much? Train your body to burn fat a bit better and ease off the pace? Granted you need to practice race fuelling but isnt this a bit much for all long runs?

  • The worst nutrition sport clip I ever have seen! But do you run or do you eat? I do not need to eat anything at all!
    The best advice is not taking your breakfast and does not eat any gel if the run is less than 2h! More than 2 hours just an isotonic drink for salt and fructose to recover the glycogen on the liver so your brain can still function!

  • Hi Ben, great video!
    I’m training for an ultra atm. My current running pack isn’t working for me, I was just wondering what one you use or if you had any good suggestions?

  • Useful video at the point I’m possibly trying something crazy as town to town (52,7km) on asphalt without ever running marathon. I’ve got some long hikes and one 16 and half hour mountaineering experience in my previous life. I guess it’s all about pacing and fueling, feeling +140HR is my unknown fueling zone but even biscuits goes easily at 130-135HR.

  • I kept on getting headaches after runs, particularly on hot days and assumed it was my hydration, but still got them despite necking loads of water. Eventually worked out it was probably electrolytes. Don’t really like the idea of gels etc, as favour more ‘natural’ foods etc. After a bit of a Google Ive ended up having a glass of coconut water after a run and if I’m taking water with me I put a bit of lemon juice in it.

    Not 100% sure on the science behind it but that seems to work for me. The next challenge as I start to try and do longer runs is food. Might have a look at the chia bars.

    Thanks for the great videos.

  • The new Mountain Fuel flapjacks are by far the nicest thing I’ve eaten on a long fell race, the ginger one especially. Their jellies go down a lot easier than gels as well. I also make my own snacks of oats, chopped dates, dark chocolate and peanut butter and a drop of honey rolled into balls for longer races

  • i hate gu. it feels like you are eating paste. ive become a big fan of the hi5 gels. granted they are huge, but they are nice and liquid and really easy to get down.

  • How similar are the Huma gels to Spring energy gels? I have got on really well with Spring energy but they are a pain in the back side to buy in the UK

  • Concentrated cherry juice from Holland and Barrett in my smoothies has been a revelation Ben. I have used it for a week now and had my best running week in a long time.

  • If I run sub 75% max HR I do it for an eternity. 180min runs are no problem at all even with last 15k in Marathon pace ( 4:15min/km) is no problem.

  • Hi Ben. If I only have about 30 minutes before my long run, what would you recommend I can eat? Having a bagel or a full breakfast might be too heavy.

    I’m starting your level 2 half-marathon plan on Monday. Gonna reach out to you via e-mail on some things I am unsure of how to do.

    Great video, again. I usually just run with a bottle of water with my for all my runs including long runs. 13km is my current long run and it was hard because of how humid it is here. I might have to switch out the water with gatorade or something.

  • You talk about High5 and Maurten gels, and that the later one is more expensive. But is it really better Ben? Do you feel a greater “rush” of energi when you use Maurten gels? I’m curious to know. Cheers mate!

  • Great video Ben. �� I sip active root from my soft flasks and use shot blocks. I really struggle with gels, really kind find anything that agrees with me. I also eat food on my way round, I guess it’s not going to work when your racing guess ultras a bit different. Tend to take a few porridge oat kind of bars

  • Teach your body to burn fat by not ingesting so much freaking carbs during the easy long runs. Preferably NONE.
    Only in key workouts (close to race pace) do you fuel your body with nutrition to test your GI tolerance at speed.

    End of story.

    Eating and drinking all that stuff is a total waste of money. It doesn’t benefit you.

    Kilian Jornet ran for 5days of workouts without ingesting any food and he’s a world champion mountain runner. Your body won’t become a skeleton and catabolic like people would like make it out to be. It’s bullocks.

  • Great advice Ben, apart from all the different gels and electrolyte drinks I find I crave salt after a couple of hours and I have found baby pouches really good.

  • i really like Gu Gels. but they’re a bit expensive. I only eat them on workout 2hour or longer. Also find electrolyte drinks very helpful on long workout too. SIS GO Hydro Hydration Tablets are my personal favourite

  • Hi Ben, nice to see some inside views from you.

    As you said it really depends on your type of training or even a race what your heading out for.
    But here is my experience with different distances.

    10k or shorter race would pretty much a simple and plain breakfast with not to many complex carbohydrates like bagels with jam or just simple an apple or a 1-2 bananas with some peanutbutter. A plant based yoghurt with fruit would be also an option. If you’re going with a high fiber breakfast on fast races you’re burning up to much energy for digestion these things
    I also highly recommend some amino energy’s (foodspring) before the race. Keeps me fresh and hydrated.

    10-20k trial and road race
    Also not to much of Fibre, just eat a little bit more, like on a 10k race 1 1/2 — 2 hours before the start.
    And of course some aminos ��

    Everything longer you should eat something wich long lasting, like porridge or waffles wich are high in Fibre, maybe a good smoothie could be an option (but be careful not ending up in the bushes every 10min ��)
    And I would recommend to eat some solid foods on longer days, like ultras or endurance races. Get in what’s offered on the aid stations, like savory or salty stuff. You’re definitely craving these things after the 10th gel ✌��

    Rock on Ben, you’re killing it ����

  • Do you ever do a fasted run ben? Those that run at 5-6-7am in the morning surely dont eat a carb breakfast 2 hours before or do they?

  • Almond Chocolote Milk all the way for me! Another great video Ben! They ( Youtube ) should really invent a ‘Super Thumbs up button’ for video’s!

  • Almond Chocolote Milk all the way for me! Another great video Ben! They ( Youtube ) should really invent a ‘Super Thumbs up button’ for video’s!

  • Hi Ben. Just a quick word about running in the heat. Apart from the usuals that you’ve mentioned your body doesn’t metabolise fats efficiently in the heat and relies even more on carbs. I had a run this afternoon in 38°c heat and replaced my usual water/electrolytes mix with a sport drink for the added carbs and i certainly felt the difference. This tip applies as well for low intensity runs. So more heat = more sugar

  • Great advice Ben, apart from all the different gels and electrolyte drinks I find I crave salt after a couple of hours and I have found baby pouches really good.

  • After trying a High5 gel provided by a race, I found the taste was so bitter and disgusting…I’ve tried a multitude of gel makes since then and found Torq to be the most palatable…I just stick with those now…For longer runs I do prefer to include something a bit more solid…I recently started using the Clif Bloks in training and I’ve used the Etixx Energy Nougat in races (although, I imagine any nougat would work just as well)
    So I mix up some solid food sources with gels…I tend to find I don’t perform very well on an empty feeling stomach…

  • I kept on getting headaches after runs, particularly on hot days and assumed it was my hydration, but still got them despite necking loads of water. Eventually worked out it was probably electrolytes. Don’t really like the idea of gels etc, as favour more ‘natural’ foods etc. After a bit of a Google Ive ended up having a glass of coconut water after a run and if I’m taking water with me I put a bit of lemon juice in it.

    Not 100% sure on the science behind it but that seems to work for me. The next challenge as I start to try and do longer runs is food. Might have a look at the chia bars.

    Thanks for the great videos.

  • Are there any good alternatives to gels? They are hella expensive and it’s kinda off-putting, since they are key for long distance running.

  • I just did a similar vid. I’ve found Tailwind & Huma Gels work for me, but just like running shoes and gear everyone is different

  • Ok I agree with all you said but I would like to remind everyone that eating gels WILL NOT let you avoid the wall if you don’t teach your body to use fats during training. And the only way to do it is to log EASY miles (I would say at least 50-60 miles/80-100 km per week, AT LEAST) for several weeks in a row during in your training. This is far more important than taking gels with you. Without training (fat burning adaptation) the wall will be inevitable for everyone:)

  • Im running my first marathon on sunday but ive never ran longer than a half marathon. Feeling a bit nervous. Have you got any tips or advice?:)

  • What on Earth are you doing Ben??? It’s a no no to drink soo much water just before you run and worse advice you gave to eat 1 or 2 hours before your run!!!!

    You need to hydrate and eat well the day before and then in the morning just have a coffee, tea or a glass of water…. with some electrolytes

    And regarding what to take on your run: You can run a 20 miler on just one gel by not taking it all in one go, take a bit at mile 9, 13 and then 17 because your body would already be hydrated well from the day before.

    Just try my advice and you will see a massive improvement.

  • Great stuff, as always, Sage. I enjoy your videos and appreciate you sharing your tips, routines, experiences, etc. Keep ’em coming. Especially like the fact that you down some chips during races. I sometimes grab them, as well, but I’m fortunate to have a bit of an iron gut. Good luck in the  Wings for Life Race in Denver. I’ll be rooting for you from up in Summit County as I prepare for the HITS Triathlon in Grand Junction in a few weeks…using your “Sage” advice along the way.

  • I don’t get why people carry stuff on their hands. Sure, you get the thing that slides in nicely, but from a inertial standpoint…. I’d rather the mass be closer to, well, my center of mass and not at one of my extremities.

  • I eat a whole food plant based diet. I haven’t tried those gels nor do I plan to. Those are not healthy at all. When I do my 20+ mile long runs I’ve had really good results with these cookie bites I make. 4 ingredients. Oat flour, banana date and dash of salt. I make the oat flour in my vitamix. I put the banana (or you can use sweet potatoes) and dates in the food processor, liquify it add the oat flour until it gets to be a dough consistency. I make 1” balls and bake them for about 10-15 min. Put them in a baggie and take them in my run. I tried bites that include almond butter and those just make me feel nauseous during my run. These cookie bites I make taste good and work great for me.

  • Completed a Ultra-Trail Australia 100k over the weekend,

    I was getting pretty bored of my usual race fuel, so went with a few Vegemite sandwiches at roughly halfway in the race. Picked up the pace to finish in under 20hours

  • I’m now wondering what flavour(s) of gel Nate does actually like! Apple definitely is a flavour that SiS does, but not sure if you get them in the US.

  • Useful video at the point I’m possibly trying something crazy as town to town (52,7km) on asphalt without ever running marathon. I’ve got some long hikes and one 16 and half hour mountaineering experience in my previous life. I guess it’s all about pacing and fueling, feeling +140HR is my unknown fueling zone but even biscuits goes easily at 130-135HR.

  • “you burn fat for the first 20 minutes” wrong, you are fueled by glucose “I used to drink gatorade but I think it has too much sugar” “I take a gel every 20 minutes” riiight

  • Mario mentioned fueling every 20-30 mins. I am curious what he would do on a road race in comparison. I am adjusting my fueling from road to trail. I tried UCAN recently for my first marathon and trail race after seeing on TRE. Love the electrolyte powder. It worked sooo much better than Gatorade and better on my stomach as well. Thanks TRE and UCAN!

  • i use sponser gel and competition drinks. gel is very good on fat basic macadamia cocos… prompt energy. https://www.sponser.de/de_en/liquid-energy-ultra.html

  • You won’t burn fat if you constantly ingest carbs. Try the Keto diet. Best thing I’ve done for distance racing. Takes some time to adapt but once you are there the benefits are endless!

  • Would you say there is a maximum on solid food during a marathon? I am about to do my first, but not quite sure how much too eat because during training I never eat.

  • Great suggestions and advice, especially regarding the hydration rate and amount and frequency of carb intake. One big omission you didn’t discuss was protein intake during an ultra. If you’re primarily relying on carb, potassium, sodium, and you’re not ingesting at least five grams of protein per hour, you may bonk after five hours. I’ve taken to drinking a coconut water (potassium, electrolytes) and water mix with two teaspoons of Muscle Milk (protein) powder per 20 oz flask. Also, I eat a protein bar every 90 minutes while hitting the Gu Gels every 35-45 minutes. Much like what you said, I prefer switching to straight water in the flasks after I’ve consumed the opening 40-60 ozs of the coconut water/tap water/protein powder mix.

  • Great tips, thanks! I especially the reminder that we need to be cognizant of our sleep and what we are eating days before the race.

  • Hey man your videos have always helped me through my running journey. I joined the running club at my college and I now find myself coming back to them. Thanks bro!

  • I wonder why he is not eating complex carbs before a long run. Toast with peanut butter will not give you energy for several hours of running

  • Hiiii Bennnn HUGE PROBLEM,. When I eat before a long run I feel really heavy and don’t run well, with minimum amount of food in my stomach I can run 13 mi, which is a half-marathon!!!! How do I run the marathon like this and NoT hit the WALL??? Helpppppp

  • Hi everyone, if anyone else needs to find out about how to run a marathon try Sarparder Running Expert Starter (do a google search)? I’ve heard some super things about it and my m8 got cool success with it.

  • Do you know Michael Arnstein? He is a ultrarunner who mainly eats fruit.
    I’m a fan of (minimal) stimulants and processed foods. I mean, peanut butter and fried potatoes are really bad for blood flow, cause the oil enters the blood stream, stickig red blood cells together, clogging arteries and inhibiting oxygen transportation… Also, fruit is much better than complex carbohydrates like a bar, because it digests a lot easier, therefore not needig too much blood for digestion which I could imagine to be very beneficial.

  • Whenever I approach around 30 miles I begin to vomit. Or sometimes it happens an hour after my run when I am trying to get water or food down.  Any Thoughts on things I can try? I will do blood tests eventually if needs be to diagnose. 

    A friend suggested in maybe a pH imbalance and I can could try limes or maybe something basic when I am approaching that distance.

  • Nice video Sage. I love nutrition stuff. For a future training talk, can you touch on tapering? How long before a race do you start cutting back? What types of ways do you prepare nutritionally the week before? Etc… Thanks!

  • Great information, Sage!!! I learned a lot of new ideas to try I’ve been really struggling with my energy levels and I think you gave some very useful tips here that I can try out. Thanks so much!

  • you smokin crack, the chemicals in chips and coke are counter productive, your lying or your just a idiot.

    try beet juice combined with granny apple and a little lemon.

    also load up on watercress with your last meal before racing.

  • Thank you for actually giving real tips unlike some other ultra runners who feel they need to guard their diets like its hidden treasure.

  • Your on caffine man, get of the drug. Cant understand, you say you eat gels and high carb breakfast but say gatorade have to much sugar. And from what you say you eat for breakfast it dosent even sound like a high carb breakfast, penanutbutter etc. Get of the caffine and carb up man, dont be afraid of sugar! Sugar is whats fuel you, not fat or protein.

    Love your other tips man!!

  • Not a bad video, I think you are the first person I ever heard say that they drink coffee before a race.  I have never heard that before.  Isn’t coffee and infamous dehydrator?  I would think tea would be better?  But I won’t argue, you certainly know what you are doing.

  • I’m all about the gels at regular intervals, but what do you do with all the garbage!? Do you have a designated pocket that you don’t mind getting gooey to put the wrappers in or do you carry a plastic baggie or what?

  • hi  friend   you doing good.  I like to run marathon I  don’t have running partner  can you help  me  marathon work schedule   workout program Now I am working In UAE  weather also not good

  • Gu Vanilla Bean is the only flavor that tastes good to me AND sits easy on my stomach. (I’ve tried some other Gu flavors and they range from bad to awful 😉 The small amount of caffeine adds a bit of a boost too. Some of the Cliff Blocks also taste fairly good and seem to digest well.

  • It’s kind of cool hearing a pro like yourself getting nerves before a race. It makes me feel better about my lack of sleep for sure:)

  • My morning runs tend to be 7am or earlier so I tend to have to go for something really light to start with. Some nuts and seeds, but I’ll need to try out new things as the runs get longer

  • Good vid as usual.

    You said you don’t drink Gatorade because it contains a lot of sugar!?
    Don’t Gels contain a lot of sugar as well?

    Gatorade has sugar and elecrolytes as well. It’s easier and faster to digest since it’s a liquid… So I’m wondering if there is really a difference between your formula and a gatorade. I could be wrong.

  • My morning runs tend to be 7am or earlier so I tend to have to go for something really light to start with. Some nuts and seeds, but I’ll need to try out new things as the runs get longer

  • thanks for this. interesting for a perspective… i’m running my 16th marathon sunday and still can’t seem to get the balance between staying well fuelled during marathon distance and not feeling/being sick during the run…

  • i hate gu. it feels like you are eating paste. ive become a big fan of the hi5 gels. granted they are huge, but they are nice and liquid and really easy to get down.

  • You’re much less likely to HIT THE WALL AS HARD if you’re FAT ADAPTED ( the process of training the body to BURN FAT MORE EFFICIENTLY AND QUICKLY). This is achieved through PRACTICING RUNNING IN A FASTED STATE. Fewer CARBS leads to LESS INFLAMMATION. Consuming a higher ( 65 percent ) of one’s diet consisting of high quality fats will improve an individual’s overall health in my opinion. If only because you’re not as exposed to insulin which in large quantity is TOXIC.

  • If you train with gels during multiple long runs each week are you risking the efficiency of your carbohydrate stores on race day?

  • Good info and quite helpful. I do distance cycling and follow a similar routine… high carb breakfast and steady food during my rides. One suggestion: get a tripod, bro.:-)