Sodium Intake for Athletes – Plus 10 Natural In your diet

 

Top 10 Sources of Sodium in the American Diet (700 Calorie Meals) DiTuro Productions

Video taken from the channel: DiTuroProductions


 

Sodium and Bodybuilding Sodium and Performance (HIGH SODIUM INTAKE or LOW SODIUM INTAKE?)

Video taken from the channel: James Schultz, Ph.D.


 

Where do we get most of our sodium?

Video taken from the channel: American Heart Association


 

15 Foods High In Sodium And What You Should Eat Instead

Video taken from the channel: Bestie


 

Sodium Restriction

Video taken from the channel: Perioperative Interactive Education


 

High Salt Diets & Athletic Performance w/ Dr. James Dinicolantonio

Video taken from the channel: High Intensity Health


 

BJC Med Talks The top 10 high-sodium foods

Video taken from the channel: BJC HealthCare


 

Sodium and Bodybuilding Sodium and Performance (HIGH SODIUM INTAKE or LOW SODIUM INTAKE?)

Video taken from the channel: James Schultz, Ph.D.


 

Top 10 Sources of Sodium in the American Diet (700 Calorie Meals) DiTuro Productions

Video taken from the channel: DiTuroProductions


 

Where do we get most of our sodium?

Video taken from the channel: American Heart Association


 

Sodium Restriction

Video taken from the channel: Perioperative Interactive Education


 

High Salt Diets & Athletic Performance w/ Dr. James Dinicolantonio

Video taken from the channel: High Intensity Health


 

BJC Med Talks The top 10 high-sodium foods

Video taken from the channel: BJC HealthCare


 

Dr. Stephen Phinney ‘Achieving and Maintaining Nutritional Ketosis’

Video taken from the channel: Low Carb Down Under


Sodium (Salt) Intake for Athletes Every person in the Western world consumes more than sufficient quantities of salt through their diet to satisfy their bodily needs for sodium, one of the two elements that form salt; 90% of all dietary salt consumed is excreted through the urine as excess. Sodium is particularly important surrounding exercise to prevent hyponatremia, or low blood sodium. Sodium Recommendations. These are the general guidelines for sodium surrounding endurance exercise lasting longer 90 minutes.

300-500 mg sodium pre-exercise; 500-1000 mg sodium per hour during exercise; 500-700 mg sodium post-exercise. A 2015 study found that athletes who adequately replaced the sodium lost in their sweat finished a middle distance triathlon an average of 26 minutes faster than those who didn’t. Whilst that sort of performance gain isn’t going to be possible for everyone, it does highlight the potential impact of getting your hydration strategy right. A high sodium intake may not be feasible, healthy, or safe for everybody. What Is Sodium, Anyway?

Salt is an electrolyte, putting it in the same. Consumption of 12,000 mg (12 grams) or more of sodium per day is regarded as toxic. The average western diet contains 2.3-20 grams of Sodium per day.

In 70 diets computer-analyzed from actual food-intake lists of athletes and non-athletes 1996-2006, endurance athlete consumed between 6000-8000 mg sodium per day. Sodium Adds Up Quickly. Here is a sample diet of 3 meals and 3 small snacks, providing a total sodium content of more than 3,200 mg.

That’s much higher than the levels recommended in the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans External. 2. Reference. Sources of Sodium in Your Diet All across the United States, high sodium intake is a major problem. On average, American adults eat more than 3,400 milligrams (mg) of sodium each day, which is significantly higher than the recommended limit.

The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that Americans consume less than 2,300 mg of. Those last additions only account for about 11 percent of our total sodium intake, so even if you never use the salt shaker, you’re probably getting too much sodium. Our Salty Six infographic shows the top six sodium sources in the U.S. diet. Drinks to Increase Sodium Intake.

It’s a rare individual that needs to increase his sodium intake after all, most Americans consume way more than the 1,500to 2,300-milligram maximum a day. However, certain people such as athletes who sweat a lot might experience a condition known as hyponatremia, or low. From performing individual dietary analysis of foods and drinks consumed by endurance athletes, I observed that an average dietary sodium intake ranged between 6000-8000 mg daily.

There is a considerable sodium store volume due to dietary excess and around 57,000 mg sodium available in the extracellular spaces.

List of related literature:

Dietary guidelines published by various international organizations recommend reducing dietary intake sodium chloride to around 65 mmol/day (corresponding to 1.5 g/day of sodium or 3.8 g/day sodium chloride), while increasing potassium intake to 120 mmol/day (4.7 g/day) for healthy adults.

“Guyton & Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology E-Book: A South Asian Edition” by Mario Dr Vaz, Tony Dr Raj, Kurpad Dr Anura
from Guyton & Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology E-Book: A South Asian Edition
by Mario Dr Vaz, Tony Dr Raj, Kurpad Dr Anura
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

The 2005 American College of Sports Medicine recommends consuming snacks and fluids containing sodium to help reduce the risk of EAH and to treat muscle cramping (beverages containing 50–100 mmol/L sodium chloride salt) (American College of Sports Medicine et al., 2007).

“Sports, Exercise, and Nutritional Genomics: Current Status and Future Directions” by Debmalya Barh, Ildus I. Ahmetov
from Sports, Exercise, and Nutritional Genomics: Current Status and Future Directions
by Debmalya Barh, Ildus I. Ahmetov
Elsevier Science, 2019

As caloric intake increases, sodium levels rise, so even an athlete who is careful about avoiding highsodium foods (for example, soy sauce, fast foods, saltytasting snacks) may find that sodium intake is above 3,000 mg (3 g) daily.

“Nutrition for Sport and Exercise” by Marie Dunford, J. Andrew Doyle
from Nutrition for Sport and Exercise
by Marie Dunford, J. Andrew Doyle
Cengage Learning, 2011

Americans consume high amounts of sodium, in part because of the amounts used in processed foods.15,23 Average sodium intake for Americans ranges between 3000 and 4500 mg/day (130–195 mEq Na or 8–10 g of sodium chloride).

“Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology” by Marcia Nelms, Kathryn P. Sucher, Karen Lacey, Sara Long Roth
from Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology
by Marcia Nelms, Kathryn P. Sucher, et. al.
Cengage Learning, 2010

One of the reasons our diet is high in salt (sodium chloride) and low in potassium is that we eat many processed foods, which are high in sodium and chloride, and too few fresh unprocessed foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, which are high in potassium.

“Visualizing Nutrition: Everyday Choices” by Mary B. Grosvenor, Lori A. Smolin
from Visualizing Nutrition: Everyday Choices
by Mary B. Grosvenor, Lori A. Smolin
Wiley, 2017

For a person (for example, a 25-year-old male) who requires 1,500 mg (1.5 g) of sodium daily, this would represent approximately 67% of the AI and 44% of the maximum sodium intake recommended in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2,300 mg/day).

“Nutritional Sciences: From Fundamentals to Food” by Michelle McGuire, Kathy A. Beerman
from Nutritional Sciences: From Fundamentals to Food
by Michelle McGuire, Kathy A. Beerman
Cengage Learning, 2012

On average, American adults consume 3,400 mg of sodium daily, generally attributable to processed foods, including canned and prepackaged foods, and food ordered in restaurants (Bibbins-Domingo, 2014; Eckel et al., 2013; Pearson et al., 2013).

“The Advanced Practice Nurse Cardiovascular Clinician” by Kelley M. Anderson, PhD, FNP
from The Advanced Practice Nurse Cardiovascular Clinician
by Kelley M. Anderson, PhD, FNP
Springer Publishing Company, 2015

In this way, a person eating 2000 calories per day would not consume more than 2000 mg of sodium (2 grams of sodium or 5.2 gram of salt, about 4/5 of a teaspoon) so that even if processed foods comprised the whole of their diet, they would remain within the general WHO guidance (World Health Organization 2013).

“Nutrition and Integrative Medicine: A Primer for Clinicians” by Aruna Bakhru
from Nutrition and Integrative Medicine: A Primer for Clinicians
by Aruna Bakhru
CRC Press, 2018

There are various methods to raise the sodium intake, such as increased use of table salt on foods, eating salty snacks, adding salt to sports drinks, and the use of salt tablets.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Table salt accounts for only 15% of sodium intake; the remainder comes from water and highly processed foods that are infused with sodium to enhance flavor (salty snack foods, processed cheeses, pickles, breads and bakery products, smoked meats/sausages, and many fast food and convenience foods).

“Personal Health: Perspectives and Lifestyles” by Patricia A. Floyd, Sandra E. Mimms, Caroline Yelding
from Personal Health: Perspectives and Lifestyles
by Patricia A. Floyd, Sandra E. Mimms, Caroline Yelding
Cengage Learning, 2007

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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  • Idea: I carry Redmonds salt with me everywhere in repurposed mini Tobasco glass bottles. Keep in the truck or in your pocket, easy. Also keep Ghee in the center console but haven’t found a stealthy way of carrying. Also, eating shashimi will not use soy but mix lemon juice, salt & wasabi for sauce & I like it better!

  • Too bat the graph at 7:26 does not have avocado oil on it. And how old is the graph? I heard Lard has way more PUFA than this shows because they feed pigs an unhealthy feed that changes the fat profile.

  • I haven’t heard Dr. Phinney mentioning eggs as part of a low carb/ketogenic diet.
    I eat a 4 egg omelette each morning with butter, perhaps I should replace it with meat?

  • THIS IS SO NECESSARY. I find it always baffling how most keto communities advise on a high protein ketogenic diet for people coming from metabolic damage and diabetes without considering that both Carbs and Protein are glucogenic macronutrients. I try every day to explain the science behind keto in layman terms, this video has been invaluable to link to my viewers, thank you!

  • Sorry to be an editor, Dr. Phinney, but near the end of your lecture that should be “eat FEWER carbs”. Otherwise, this was an excellent lecture.

  • The best for a Fatty Liver ; take 1000 mg. of Chloline with Inositol with each meal you eat. Also take 2000 mg of “stinging nettle” every day to bring down bad estrogen and lose weight. Also Take 800 mg. 2×400 of “Lipoic acid” a day.
    Sleep 10 hour every night sleep helps lose weight control your hormones and release HGH try to be in bed by 9:00 pm and wake up early and exercise for 40 minutes before you eat breakfast…..eat a low low fat and low carb diet, don’t fry, don’t eat any type of oils,no salad dressings, NO OILS!! NO FATS! no sugar, no coffee, no chocolate, no stimulants of any kind, go in the sun 40 minutes a day, Eat no dairy, no bread,no junk food and drink lots of apple cider vinegar with water.. Eats two lemons a day for vitamin C and detox your liver and kidneys.

    Eat daikon radish every day for healthy thyroid you can buy it at any Korean grocery store. The intermittent fasting diet also helps…. I lost 96 pounds and I no longer have a fatty liver, no sleep apnea, and no more diabetic, took me 5 yrs I am a vegan..nothing is easy.
    one of my favorite books that will help you lose weight ;
    The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss Paperback – March 1, 2016
    by Dr. Jason Fung ; http://www.amazon.com/Obesity-Code-Unlocking-Secrets-Weight/dp/1771641258

    Choline supplementation improves liver function and improves cholesterol
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24368431

    The liver is our largest internal organ (the skin is technically the largest organ) in our bodies. The importance of a healthy liver cannot be overemphasized. Americans have very unhealthy livers, with epidemic rates of liver disease, including cancer, hepatitis, cirrhosis, and fatty liver (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) among other conditions. It is vital to maintain the health of your liver throughout life.

    The liver has two enemies: 1) fats, and that includes vegetable oils, and 2) alcohol and drugs. Americans eat a 42% fat calorie diet, and most all of these fats are saturated animal fats. Saturated fats harm our bodies the most.The real road to healthy liver function is to eat a low-fat, high-fiber, low-calorie, low-protein diet.Stop eating, or limit, red meat, poultry, and eggs. Take dairy of any kind completely out of your life, including low-fat and no-fat dairy products. Keep your fat intake under 20%, and from vegetable, not animal, sources. Under 20% is the magic number. 10% is the ideal.

    At the famous Mayo Clinic (Expert Opinion in Pharmacotherapy) people with non-alcoholic fatty liver were given TMG with impressive results. This is intimately related to the epidemic of diabetes and other blood sugar problems we now suffer from. Many people have fatty liver disease, but simply don’t know it. The same results were found at the famous Stanford University (Review of Gastrological Disorders). Later at the Mayo Clinic (Best Practices in Research in Clinical Gastroenterology) doctors successfully treated non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Anyone with hepatitis should do this program for two years. Please read the article on hepatitis in our library Hepatitis-C.

    Doctors at the University of Virginia (Current Treatments in Gastroenterology) gave TMG to people with non-alcoholic fatty livers. They suggested this as a superior treatment to drugs, along with better food choices. Fatty liver leads to far more serious conditions including early death. The same results were found at Loyola University (Nutrition Reviews).

  • My grandparents ate lard sandwiches during the great depression. My mother would always tell me to be thankful that we had butter instead of lard like her parents. Turns out lard is ok!

  • as i tried many diets before im gonna give it a try and see if how my performance goes with it.however i dont trust people who drink coffe and use apple products

  • Salt, like oils, is not all the same. Instead of over-processed table salt which usually contains harmful flow agents, and is heated to over 1,200 F get natural, unprocessed salt. The high temperature changes the salt, making it less beneficial. Himalayan salt is a well known unprocessed salt with high trace mineral content but Redmond’s Natural Trace Mineral salt from Utah is also excellent. It has fewer food miles, and is more affordable, too. Both Himalayan and Redmond’s salt taste great, too!

  • Plastics, especially flexible types like in freezer bags, transfer a number of harmful synthetic chemicals to whatever food or beverages are in contact with them. Instead, try freezing in glass. We’ve been freezing food in glass, including canning jars, for decades, and only had a couple crack. KEY: do not fill completely, especially when filling with liquids. Flour, nuts, etc keep better when frozen but do not expand like liquids do.

  • Love his videos. But I can’t find answer to this question in them: If ketones test consistently between 3 and 5, what’s the proper course of action? More calories keeping the proper ratios, or more carbs?

  • how long does it take, on average, to get back into ketosis, if you are keto adapted but eat more carbs than you should and are thrown out of it?

  • Ketosis does nothing more than curb your appetite, you eat less and thus lose weight. I did it strict for 7 months, less than 20 grams a day carbs, bought a ketone and blood glucose meter. Hit the gym 6 days a week. I lost 40 pounds in 5 months and then stalled. Sometimes you would go 5 weeks without loosing a pound. I started tracking my calories and i had to consume roughly 1500 a day to lose any weight. If i ate 1500 kcals a day on a healthy diet with carbs i would have lost the same amount of weight. I did like the stable energy levels, you never get hungry or crave foods so it’s easy to consume less food. I weigh 210 pounds and pretty fit. This is not a quick fast fix, requires alot of pre planning, meal preps and dedication, the diet is difficult to stick to as you end up eating the same few meals every day. I went months lifting my ass off at the gym and wasn’t getting any stronger because the muscle needs insulin to grow, plain and simple. I started eating cabs again and immediately noticed strength and muscle gains in the gym.

  • Wow this talk has so much useful information that I am gonna take screenshots of the slides for future reference. Maybe I’ll even print them off and stick them on my wall. I have been doing keto for a couple of weeks, but have hardly lost any weight and am feeling tired. I think I have done a pretty good job of cutting carbs, but I am probably still eating too much protein and not enough fat. I think I also have a bit of keto flu, so I will buy that vegetable juice in the stores that I have been avoiding cos they put 0.5g of salt in every 100ml.

  • I read the book and I did the ketogenic diet. I felt great for the first couple weeks or something. I felt high energy and euphoria after maybe a week into it, but I remember a while after that I felt like crap and low energy and couldn’t train at all. I was getting enough calories, though I know better sources now. I did it for 6 months and was not feeling well or having any benefit. I saw no fat loss and couldn’t train. I was doing something wrong. I had very high ketones up to 7mg/dl sometimes. I recently learned about intermittent fasting and carb cycling and suspect one or both of those things are the missing part of the puzzle.

  • And this is the biggest problem with the people who are pro ketosis, depending on which advocate you talk to you get told a completely different story. This Dr talks about eating cheese and drinking coffee and some nuts. Another very popular hyper woman on YouTube says NEVER EVER EVER eat cheese, nuts or coffee if you want to get into ketosis, then there’s the fraud who sells his own brand of coffee. No wonder the ketosis movement doesn’t get the respect it deserves, the top players in the movement agree on so little, and I’m saying this as someone who believes in the principles but am confused by the “experts” contradicting each other.

  • I once blended olive oil and butter and out it in the fridge till it became a spread. Upon eating some, my brain had some kind of rush, and it was as if I had taken a strange drug. I never felt like that with any other food.

  • This guy predicted soybean oil might be bad for you years before studies just started saying the same…  Impressed!  Bonus for the sodium and magnesium supplementation.  Nice job Doc.

  • 18:00 “50% increase in CVD and 50% increase in all-cause mortality when you go from 4 grams [of sodium] to 2.3”
    Source? Maybe I’ve missed something, but after a nontrivial amount of time spent searching for it, including in the referenced NEJM study, I haven’t seen any such numbers mentioned anywhere. Some suggested a reevaluation of the 2.3 g/day recommendation, but all of the conclusions were alluding to more research being needed to establish more appropriate values. Other studies point out an association of low sodium intake to the diseases dr. Phinney suggests an association to in this video, but those are made somewhat controversial by a review from 2014. An association between sodium and blood pressure also remains relevant.

    2011.05 Fatal and nonfatal outcomes, incidence of hypertension, and blood pressure changes in relation to urinary sodium excretion (PMID: 21540421)
     “CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based cohort, systolic blood pressure, but not diastolic pressure, changes over time aligned with change in sodium excretion, but this association did not translate into a higher risk of hypertension or CVD complications. Lower sodium excretion was associated with higher CVD mortality.”

    2006.03 Sodium intake and mortality in the NHANES II follow-up study (PMID: 16490476)
    “The inverse association of sodium to CVD mortality seen here raises questions regarding the likelihood of a survival advantage accompanying a lower sodium diet. These findings highlight the need for further study of the relation of dietary sodium to mortality outcomes.”
    “Adjusted HR of CVD mortality for sodium <2300 mg was 1.37 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.81, P =.033), and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.10-1.50, P =.003) for all-cause mortality."
    (he only study that seems to be suggestive of the values dr. Phinney is talking about, perhaps it is the source of his numbers?).

    But:

    2014.06 Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension (PMCID: PMC4105387)
    “A single RCT showed an increase in the risk of all-cause death in those with congestive heart failure receiving a low-sodium diet. In contrast, He et al. (52) simultaneously analyzed normotensive individuals and hypertensive patients from the same studies including Taylor’s meta-analysis. They reported that salt reduction at 2.0 to 2.3 g per day significantly decreased the risk of cardiovascular diseases (20% of decrease). However, in most studies supporting the fact that salt reduction increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases, methodological problems have been indicated (47,49), or study subjects were high-risk patients (46,51).”
    (references 47 and 49 are to the two studies cited above, hence the highlighting).

    And this is just one example, I suggest going over the whole paragraph goo.gl/y81ZA9.

    Should be mentioned as well:
    2012 WHO meta-analysis ( goo.gl/B4fy6d, pdf)
    p.13: “The effect of reduced sodium intake compared with usual sodium intake on all-cause mortality was not statistically significant (RR 0.70, 95%CI: 0.44, 1.14).”

    Anyhow, I agree that the 2.3g/day sodium value is probably too low, especially on keto, but based on what I’ve seen I don’t see any basis for making any concrete recommendations/conclusions. Once again, if I’m missing something feel free to enlighten me.

    Edit: to be perfectly fair, here is the referenced NEJM and Mcmaster data, respectively:
    goo.gl/v4O0Kt
    “an estimated sodium excretion that was below 3.00 g per day was also associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.44).”
    goo.gl/Ypz3W8
    “lower sodium excretion (8.6%; [HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39] for 2-2.99 g/d, 10.6%; [HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.73] for <2 g/d) were associated with an increased risk of CV death."
    Figure 1 forces me to conclude that dr. Phinney’s right, to the extent that 50% increase in risk are indeed gained. At which value they are gained is an entirely different question though. #TIL.

  • On the subject of sodium you say 2 grams and 2 grams added to a lightly salted diet.  A total of 2 grams? and what about potassium?  I  use “light” salt (half sodium, half potassium) which is the cheapest way to buy potassium at the grocery store.  Any advise?  Is it 2 grams of sodium plus? grams of potassium?

  • Great job by the interviewer, extremely knowledgeable and well prepared. Amazing info in this video, I’ve already texted it to some ppl. Crazy how many ppl demonize salt

  • It’s important to get enough potassium when sodium is increased, especially if a person is consuming a lot of calcium too. Potassium is very hard to come by too, unless you’re getting a lot of green leafy veges like kale every day.

  • What is this doctors specialty? BC if he is an MD or DO, he must be a hated man in his profession for spreading the truth. Good for him.

  • I got hit hard by not replacing enough sodium everyday. For about two weeks anytime I did strength training I would get massive headaches. It too me a while to figure it out but I need roughly 5g of sodium+ per day for me to be able to strength train (anaerobic exercise) headache free.

  • Brilliant commentary, Mike. The most poignant video I have watched of yours so far. I suffered from overtraining syndrome roughly one year ago and discovered increasing my salt intake was a key pillar toward my recovery. Thank you so much for the broad spectrum of information you provide. I have religiously applied the concepts and have nearly fully restored my health 100% naturally.

  • I had to stop going to the gym. Despite doing my best I was slowly losing strength. I’d feel so exhausted between each set that I’d have to sit down or risk fainting. After the workout I’d crash hard, occasionally giving me severe depressive symptoms. Tried a bunch of supplements, nothing worked. Tried getting help from doctors, but they were fucking useless as usual.

    Fast forward a few years, and I get the brilliant idea to greatly increase my salt intake. In just one or two days everything changed. I’m now able to go to the gym and instead of feeling like shit between the sets, I instead feel energized. By the time I’m done and have taken a walk home, I’ve already recovered and could easily do another hour at the gym or go running or something. Really turned my life around.

  • this conversation about salt is a GEM……………it goes into my permanent records. I learned about the importance of salt a couple of years ago from Barbara O’Neill, Nd from New Zealand. also a fantastic talk about water/salt/hydration. It takes a bit different approach, but her lecture and this conversation about salt SHOULD BE A “MUST LISTEN TO” for EVERY SINGLE ADULT AND CHILD………….JUST BRILLIANT. here is the link to barbara’s lecture: https://youtu.be/Fa3nJpX5QFs

  • Doctors HATE salt, but if you are stuffing yourself with sugar, not a prob. The same way they hate fats/oils. In other words, ignore doctors. They are indoctrinated into gov lies regarding what is healthy and what is not. Get nutrition advice from anyone vs a doctor.

  • this is very interesting, though he loses credibility when he pushes a low carb diet and says sugar causes insulin insensitivity (not an accurate statement) it is intramuscular lipids which block insulin (from high fat diets) and we can see evidence of this by clinical trials where low fat diets are used to reverse insulin sensitivity (curing type 2 diabetics), even whilst eating very high carb.

  • Mike! I cannot thank you enough for the work you put into your channel and your company. You help more people suffer less, than any doctor. Back on track, thanks to all the information, that you drop on people by having these extraordinary guests and sharing this priceless knowledge.

  • great video thank you for your work Dr Phinney was the final piece of the puzzle I was missing for years. Currently living in the nutritional ketosis and will need look back.

  • Doctors oath….”first do no harm…” Let’s dissect this. Do no harm to whom? The revenues of hospitals and doctors? Because the media and government need to keep people sick to profit. Low sodium diets are a one way ticket to the doctor. No red meat? No animal fats? Yep, more false information and propaganda.

  • gzzz… i have been avoiding salt lately, ugh. Come to find out i may need more of it. Bravo info… giving me more to think about it. I think we found the Linus Pauling of salt.

  • I had to stop going to the gym. Despite doing my best I was slowly losing strength. I’d feel so exhausted between each set that I’d have to sit down or risk fainting. After the workout I’d crash hard, occasionally giving me severe depressive symptoms. Tried a bunch of supplements, nothing worked. Tried getting help from doctors, but they were fucking useless as usual.

    Fast forward a few years, and I get the brilliant idea to greatly increase my salt intake. In just one or two days everything changed. I’m now able to go to the gym and instead of feeling like shit between the sets, I instead feel energized. By the time I’m done and have taken a walk home, I’ve already recovered and could easily do another hour at the gym or go running or something. Really turned my life around.

  • I am confused why Dr. James DiNicolantonio recommends Redmond’s Real salt for iodine because it has only a minuscule amount. Redmond’s even says on their website: “Redmond’s Real Salt does contain naturally-occurring iodine, but not enough to satisfy the recommended daily allowance of 150 micrograms.”

  • I have tried to increase my salt intake and I get headaches and I feel like I’m going to have my head explode, so bad I need to visit the emergency room

  • Doctors oath….”first do no harm…” Let’s dissect this. Do no harm to whom? The revenues of hospitals and doctors? Because the media and government need to keep people sick to profit. Low sodium diets are a one way ticket to the doctor. No red meat? No animal fats? Yep, more false information and propaganda.

  • incredible… salt has been on my mind lately and I’ve only recently increased my consumption of it…like in the last couple of days… and then this video pops up in my feed like magic…. and within the first couple of minutes I’m totally blown away…just wow….. amazing info.. thank you for this..

  • “nobody is consuming any copper”… I am rather sure there is another talk, possibly with this same person, where he states that copper (and I think iron too) plays role in development of neurodegenerative disease and nobody can avoid exposure to those elements because they are coming to our drinking water from the plumbing pipes.

  • Been on fasting and keto/carnivore for a while now and just finding out about the importance of quality salt intake my mind is blown.