More to consume Pre-Workout

 

What Not to Eat Pre-Workout: Health HacksThomas DeLauer

Video taken from the channel: BeFiT


Don’t take a supplement you’ve never tried before as it might affect you mid-workout. Do hydrate by drinking water to replenish the fluids you may have lost during a workout. Don’t drink alcohol because it leads to dehydration and can affect your motor skills and coordination. High-Sodium Foods (Roasted Nuts) Even though nuts are a great snack (and can help boost your mood too) most roasted nuts are also salted, and salty foods can disrupt the delicate fluid-balance required for optimal workouts, Metsovas says. “I’d avoid [high sodium foods] at all costs.

Nuts, seeds and nut butters make yummy additions to any shake or smoothie—just not before your workout. Fat moves slowly through the GI tract, which can lead to stomach troubles like cramping during exercise, says Erin Shyong, RD, MPH, CDE, a registered dietitian at Laura Cipullo’s L’ifestyle Lounge in Closter, New Jersey. Make sure you avoid these four things pre-workout for maximum results.

Citrus: If you have a delicate digestive system, the acid from fruits and juices can cause your stomach to get upset. Opt for a slice of lemon in your water post-workout instead. Skip high-fiber foods: Broccoli, beans, peas, and raspberries are all examples of food that are high in fiber. Fiber is essential to maintaining a healthy digestive tract, but it takes time for your stomach to break down these foods.

Before a workout, get your energy from fresh fruit rather than fiber-rich carbohydrates. Should You Eat Before a Workout? Short answer: Yes. If you have a few more minutes to spare to actually read into the nitty-gritty of pre-workout consumption, check it out: According to Brooklyn-based registered dietician Shana Minei Spence (better known as the wildly-positive, anti-dietician dietitian, @thenutritiontea, on Instagram), whether or not you should eat.

Common examples include dairy (especially soft cows-milk dairy), wheat (some people may have no problem with this), nightshades (tomatoes, eggplants, zucchini), fried foods, added sugar. 2) High amounts of caffeine. Firstly—whatever foods you choose in your best pre workout meals—don’t overdo it. A light meal is always preferable to avoid feeling sluggish and lethargic. Secondly, steer away from foods which contain raffinose, such as lentils, chickpeas, and black beans—which can lead to discomfort and bloating.

28. Just as important to your performance are the foods to be sure to avoid pre-workout. When you work out your body will redistribute blood flow to feed your body’s high energy state.

Blood flow to the gut and liver is reduced by nearly 80% during exercise as it is redirected to your muscles, heart, lungs and brain. While you know not to load up on cupcakes, pizza, or champagne an hour or two before a sweat sesh, there are some more surprising—even seemingly healthy—pre-workout foods that are equally.

List of related literature:

A carbohydrate drink or powder made of complex carbohydrate such as corn or maltodextrin is ideal for a preworkout drink as long as you have enough time to digest it properly.

“Natural Bodybuilding” by John Hansen
from Natural Bodybuilding
by John Hansen
Human Kinetics, 2005

A pre-workout stimulant such as caffeine, or ephedrine/caffeine (if you’re not training too late at night), or the amino acid l-tyrosine (1-3 grams) with caffeine (200 mg) will help you get through the workout.

“The Ultimate Diet 2.0” by Lyle McDonald
from The Ultimate Diet 2.0
by Lyle McDonald
Lyle McDonald, 2003

A pre-workout snack (a little protein, a little fat) like two hard-boiled eggs or an Epic bar can help prepare you for hard work, while a post-workout meal (protein-rich, with healthy carbs) can help you recover from activity.

“The Whole30 Day by Day: Your Daily Guide to Whole30 Success” by Melissa Hartwig
from The Whole30 Day by Day: Your Daily Guide to Whole30 Success
by Melissa Hartwig
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017

Amos included a preworkout snack of low-fat foods with carbohydrates and protein (for example, peanut butter on whole grain bread, a banana, and a cheese stick) to ensure his body was ready for exercise.

“Fearless Feeding: How to Raise Healthy Eaters from High Chair to High School” by Jill Castle, Maryann Jacobsen
from Fearless Feeding: How to Raise Healthy Eaters from High Chair to High School
by Jill Castle, Maryann Jacobsen
Wiley, 2013

Good choices for your pre-workout meal are pasta, rice, potatoes, sandwiches (roast beef, turkey, peanut butter and jelly), oatmeal with fruit, or a breakfast burrito with eggs and potatoes.

“The Time-Crunched Cyclist: Race-Winning Fitness in 6 Hours a Week, 3rd Ed.” by Chris Carmichael, Jim Rutberg
from The Time-Crunched Cyclist: Race-Winning Fitness in 6 Hours a Week, 3rd Ed.
by Chris Carmichael, Jim Rutberg
VeloPress, 2017

Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, beta-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28-days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

“Essentials of Exercise & Sport Nutrition: Science to Practice” by Richard B. Kreider PhD FACSM FISSN FNAK
from Essentials of Exercise & Sport Nutrition: Science to Practice
by Richard B. Kreider PhD FACSM FISSN FNAK
Lulu Publishing Services, 2019

Timing for any preworkout meal or snack is highly individualized based on what you can tolerate.

“Power Eating-4th Edition” by Susan Kleiner, Maggie Greenwood-Robinson
from Power Eating-4th Edition
by Susan Kleiner, Maggie Greenwood-Robinson
Human Kinetics, 2013

A pre-workout meal should be designed to give the body just enough energy to initiate the workout.

“Maximum Muscle, Minimum Fat: The Secret Science Behind Physical Transformation” by Ori Hofmekler, Marty Gallagher
from Maximum Muscle, Minimum Fat: The Secret Science Behind Physical Transformation
by Ori Hofmekler, Marty Gallagher
North Atlantic Books, 2008

A pre-workout snack might be two hard-boiled eggs, some deli turkey and a small handful of macadamia nuts, or a few strips of beef jerky.

“It Starts With Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways” by Dallas Hartwig, Melissa Hartwig
from It Starts With Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways
by Dallas Hartwig, Melissa Hartwig
Victory Belt Publishing, 2014

About an hour before your workout, have a snack that includes the macronutrients you need, such as a slice of Ezekiel bread with almond butter; a bowl of oatmeal with soy milk and blueberries; a Simply Bar (see Appendix C and the Resources section); or a protein shake with flaxseed oil, soy milk, and whey protein.

“The Hormone Diet: A 3-Step Program to Help You Lose Weight, Gain Strength, and Live Younger Longer” by Natasha Turner
from The Hormone Diet: A 3-Step Program to Help You Lose Weight, Gain Strength, and Live Younger Longer
by Natasha Turner
Rodale Books,

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

AlexiaLew[email protected]

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3 comments

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  • I eat 10 times the amount of how I work out and I work out pretty hard like if I go to the jim 2:00 pm I ain’t shipping until 8pm

  • I drink a protein powder with milk, ice, and a banana before working out, but while doing things like cardio I feel like I’m going to throw up. Should I just have the protein powder with water instead? Do I cut out the banana because it’s food? What about the milk?

  • Thanks for the video. I did experience effects of binging on bad sugar prior to my work out a couple of times and since then I have been avoiding it to get a better work out.
    Interesting tho that when I work out, water tastes sweeter. Lately I have just been infusing mint leaves with iced water in a can (not sure if temperature affects body)and that in itself gives me a little more boost in energy in my hot bootcamp classes.