Mediterranean Baked Eggs

 

Sheet Pan Baked Egg and Veggies

Video taken from the channel: The Mediterranean Dish


 

Mediterranean Baked Eggs CANvenient Bites

Video taken from the channel: Canned Food UK


 

AFD WW Freshbox Spicy Mediterranean Baked Eggs | Good Chef Bad Chef S9 E51

Video taken from the channel: Good Chef Bad Chef


 

Oven baked eggs with tomato sauce and capers | Mediterranean Cooking

Video taken from the channel: French Cooking Academy


 

Shakshuka Eggs in Tomato Sauce Recipe

Video taken from the channel: Home Cooking Adventure


 

Easy and Simple Low Carb Mediterranean Baked Eggs, Keto Friendly Shakshuka

Video taken from the channel: Mac & Jug


 

Shakshuka Recipe | Spicy Tomato Baked Eggs

Video taken from the channel: Recipes by Carina


 

Herbed & Baked Eggs with Feta

Video taken from the channel: Dimitra’s Dishes


 

AFD WW Freshbox Spicy Mediterranean Baked Eggs | Good Chef Bad Chef S9 E51

Video taken from the channel: Good Chef Bad Chef


 

Sheet Pan Baked Egg and Veggies

Video taken from the channel: The Mediterranean Dish


 

Oven baked eggs with tomato sauce and capers | Mediterranean Cooking

Video taken from the channel: French Cooking Academy


 

Shakshuka Eggs in Tomato Sauce Recipe

Video taken from the channel: Home Cooking Adventure


 

Shakshuka Recipe | Spicy Tomato Baked Eggs

Video taken from the channel: Recipes by Carina


 

Easy and Simple Low Carb Mediterranean Baked Eggs, Keto Friendly Shakshuka

Video taken from the channel: Mac & Jug


Baked eggs & veggies: step-by-step Step 1: Toss your veggies in EVOO and spices. I used a variety of bell peppers and red onion, thinly sliced. Gave them Step 2: Spread veggies on sheet pan and bake. Spread the veggies in one layer and bake in 400 degrees F heated oven for Step 3: Add eggs and. Ingredients 4-5 small or 1 1/2 large yellow onions, halved and sliced 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1/3 cup firmly packed julienne cut sun dried tomatoes 6-8 large eggs 3 ounces crumbled feta cheese Coarse kosher salt.

How to make STEP 1 Heat oven to 400°F. Butter 4 (8-ounce, 1 1/2-inch deep) individual glass or ceramic baking dishes. STEP 2 Spoon 1/2 cup potatoes evenly onto bottom of each baking dish. Bake 15-20 minutes or until potatoes. Mediterranean Baked Eggs (Shakshouka) Eggs are a great source of nutrition, one large egg containing 6 grams of protein and an array of vitamins and minerals.

Eggs, along with vegetables, are also a mainstay of many of the currently popular diets, including the slow-carb-diet, the Paleo diet and Atkins. This breakfast egg bake features a slightly spicy sauce that has a blend of Mediterranean flavors. Eggs are baked into the sauce and the whole thing is served with crumbled feta cheese!

This breakfast egg bake is basically a “shakshuka” recipe. Shakshuka is a dish where eggs are poached in a red sauce that simmers with a blend of spices. Mediterranean Baked Eggs (127 reviews from our customers) Most countries have variations of baked eggs cooked in tomato sauce; Huevos Rancheros in Mexico, the. Heat oil in a frying pan on medium heat Saute the tomatoes and spinach until the spinach is wilted. Add the eggs and mix to scramble.

After 30 seconds, add the feta cheese. Mediterranean Breakfast Eggs Recipes 761,392 Recipes. Would you like any pork in the recipe?

Yes No No Preference. Skip. Last updated Aug 15, 2020. This search takes into account your taste preferences. 761,392 suggested recipes.

Mediterranean. Ingredients Extra virgin olive oil: I used Private Reserve Greek extra virgin olive oil Vegetables: 1 large chopped onion, 1 to 2 green bell peppers, and 2 minced garlic cloves. These three ingredients (plus Spices: coriander, cumin, paprika — a trio of. Steps. Heat oil in 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat.

Cook onions in oil 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomato and basil. Cook about 1 minut.

List of related literature:

Break the eggs into a bowl and add a pinch of salt and pepper and the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

“Brunetti's Cookbook” by Roberta Pianaro, Donna Leon
from Brunetti’s Cookbook
by Roberta Pianaro, Donna Leon
Grove Atlantic, 2010

Bake until egg whites are opaque and yolks have desired texture, about 8 minutes, sprinkle mixture with ‘/, cup shredded PARMESAN-REGGIANO CHEESE.

“Cooking for Healthy Healing: The healing recipes. Book two” by Linda Page
from Cooking for Healthy Healing: The healing recipes. Book two
by Linda Page
Traditional Wisdom, 2002

Remove from the heat and let the eggs sit, covered, for 2 minutes.

“Essential Turkish Cuisine” by Engin Akin, Anya Bremzen
from Essential Turkish Cuisine
by Engin Akin, Anya Bremzen
ABRAMS (Ignition), 2015

Top the eggs with the remaining 2 tablespoons butter, and sprinkle with freshly ground white pepper and sea salt.

“SOUL: A Chef's Culinary Evolution in 150 Recipes” by Richards, Todd
from SOUL: A Chef’s Culinary Evolution in 150 Recipes
by Richards, Todd
Oxmoor House, Incorporated, 2018

Fold in the whites of the eggs beaten stiff, turn into a buttered dish, set in a pan of hot water, and bake in a slow oven until firm.

“Rufus Estes' Good Things to Eat: The First Cookbook by an African-American Chef” by Rufus Estes
from Rufus Estes’ Good Things to Eat: The First Cookbook by an African-American Chef
by Rufus Estes
Dover Publications, 2012

Cook them slowly in a halfinch of just warm olive oil, constantly spooning the oil over the top of the eggs, to lightly poach each part of them in oil.

“An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace” by Tamar Adler, Alice Waters
from An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace
by Tamar Adler, Alice Waters
Scribner, 2012

Transfer the eggs to a warm dish by the fire, sprinkle into the butter a small handful of grated bread, add a few spoonfuls of vinegar, pour it over the eggs, and lay round them, on the edge of the dish, some small sprigs of crisped parsley.

“The Kentucky Housewife” by Lettice Bryan
from The Kentucky Housewife
by Lettice Bryan
Applewood Books, 2001

Put in ginger, cloves, and cinnamon and heat them a little while with the eggs themselves.

“Daily Life in Renaissance Italy” by Elizabeth Storr Cohen, Thomas Vance Cohen
from Daily Life in Renaissance Italy
by Elizabeth Storr Cohen, Thomas Vance Cohen
Greenwood Press, 2001

I scramble the eggs, adding a little salt, cayenne pepper, and oregano.

“The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times” by Carol Deppe
from The Resilient Gardener: Food Production and Self-Reliance in Uncertain Times
by Carol Deppe
Chelsea Green Publishing, 2010

Fry the eggs in butter, flipping over the whites to enclose the yolks neatly (or poach them, if you prefer).

“Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book” by Jane Grigson, Yvonne Skargon
from Jane Grigson’s Vegetable Book
by Jane Grigson, Yvonne Skargon
UNP Bison Books, 2007

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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57 comments

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  • French cooking at home doesn’t get enough attention. No other cuisine seems to pay so much attention to the sauces. They raise the dishes to a level above the ordinary. The building of fonds and reduction of cooking juices along with wine, cream, butter, eggs, aromatics, cheese, stocks, etc. takes skill, patience and savoir faire. Stefan, you are a wonderful representative of the art of French cooking. Bravo!

  • I just made your Shakshuka recipe and it was to die for!�� I couldn’t believe for so much food it was so little calories. Definitely becoming one of my staples.

  • Did cooking the tomatoes affect your cast iron skillet? I’m afraid to try shakshuka my skillet as I heard it messes up the layer of oil coating.

  • Carina, Where did you find your porcelain egg holder? It looks exotic and I would love to buy one. BTW I’ve enjoyed your video for Shakshuka. Thanks in advance!!

  • How low does the heat need to be for eggs to still be runny after 10-15 mins? I had it medium low and eggs were totally overcooked after 6 mins?
    I get mine must be too hot, but just wondering if people cook eggs for 15 mins or if this is overkill?

  • French cooking at home doesn’t get enough attention. No other cuisine seems to pay so much attention to the sauces. They raise the dishes to a level above the ordinary. The building of fonds and reduction of cooking juices along with wine, cream, butter, eggs, aromatics, cheese, stocks, etc. takes skill, patience and savoir faire. Stefan, you are a wonderful representative of the art of French cooking. Bravo!

  • This is literally something I eat everyday in summer, you can add to your shakshuka chopped potatoes and zucchini, also you can have your eggs stirred in the pan with thes rest of the ingredients, so good really.

  • My Farther-in-Law pours this over a bowl with old Portuguese hard bread cut in tiny pieces. He also uses loads of unions and garlic. For the rest it looks the same. He was send into the war in Africa, picked it up there I suppose. Finger licking good, thanks for sharing, it’s one of my favourites.

  • Hi..I really enjoy watching and learning new recipes..I’ve made lots of Mediterranean food but I’ve not made shakshuka yet..my brother is vegan so I’m going to try a vegan version of it this weekend. Are there any good vegan recipes that you can share?

  • How can I store these so they don’t become soggy? How long can I store them for? I love your recipes…so yummy. I recently made your one pot Greek chicken and rice recipe…fabulous! Thank you so much for sharing!!!

  • Oh my god, I love breakfast-type dishes and I love spicy dishes. I can’t wait to try this out! A quick question, though. How do you serve this? In a bowl? Or on a plate?

  • This was the same way I made Shakshuka first time when I heard it is poached eggs in tomato. Just without seeing the recipe.

    I’m Indian. We make tomato curries like this. I didn’t put capsicum in my Shakshuka and added a little bit of ginger paste too. Otherwise it was same as this.

    I’m so glad and proud after watching this.

  • that is one of my favorite dishes..in Algeria we can add pepper..sush an amazing channel you’re presentation and how you cook.. just perfect ��Masha’allah

  • Tried cooking this for the first time. It was tasty. Husband enjoyed it! Will need to cut the recipe in half next time for just the two of us.:)

  • My Farther-in-Law pours this over a bowl with old Portuguese hard bread cut in tiny pieces. He also uses loads of unions and garlic. For the rest it looks the same. He was send into the war in Africa, picked it up there I suppose. Finger licking good, thanks for sharing, it’s one of my favourites.

  • Yum looks delicious i am making this soon can skip bell peppers as am not a big fan of them drooling over my samsung galaxy j4 love your recipes making me hungry Thanks Ramya

  • This video was almost therapeutic. Loved the music, written instructions, and visuals. Thank you. Just started making this dish. Think I’ll switch to your recipe.

  • Im loving all these hilarious comments here saying they all have it in their cuisine, with differnt languages but not ONE person spoke of the origin of the dish and the word, “Shakshouka”, not even the author..

    SHAKSHOUKA: is an EGYPTIAN BREAKFAST dish of origin.. no. Not indian or afghan or south american, it is Egyptian, and they have been doing this dish for CENTURIES… u can litteraly go to any Egyptian cafe and order this for breakfast…. also, the author of the video made it incorrect however he used most of the main ingredients

    SHAKSHOUKA: in Arabic (in Egyptian dialect ONLY)…… meaning Thorny, spicy, Hot! And the word is only used for the dish..

    There u have it.. the meaning and origin of SHAKSHOUKA

  • wow! This is very healthy dish. Thank for your video. I made my own version hope you can check it out.

    Please don’t forget to hit LIKE and SUBSCRIBE ��

  • Hi, Carina. That dish looks absolutely gorgeous and elegant. You’ve struck it rich again. I am amazed at how well you’re progressing. You are truly AWESOME at cooking. I have a question: what’s your favorite vegetarian dish that you’ve ever made? Please let me know. Have a splendid week, Carina. By the way, I love your profile photo, so adorable.:) ������

  • Did cooking the tomatoes affect your cast iron skillet? I’m afraid to try shakshuka my skillet as I heard it messes up the layer of oil coating.

  • Wholeheartedly, awesome work, I look forward to seeing your new stuff. Incredible work! If you get time, please check out my account. You’re so helpful!

  • Hello Home Cooking Adventure! I hope this message finds you well. I am a producer at INSIDER and I recently found this amazing video and we would love to feature it in one of our videos about egg dishes around the world! For a little knowledge about us, INSIDER is a part of Business Insider. All of your footage will be credited with your Facebook, Instagram or YouTube page. 

    Please let me know if this is okay with you! You can also email me at [email protected] businessinsider.com

  • Wow you really did it good! ���� I’m from Saudi Arabia and we do eat Shakshuka in our breakfast, but we mix the eggs we don’t leave it that way and make sure it cooked very well, you make hungry now i think i’ll make some. ����❤️❤️

  • Wholeheartedly, awesome work, I look forward to seeing your new stuff. Incredible work! If you get time, please check out my account. You’re so helpful!

  • Many cultures have a form of baked eggs/tomato sauce. I recently tried shakshuka (please forgive any misspelling)…baked eggs are the best.

  • This recipe is one of my favorites ❤️. I add some sliced kalamata olives after cooking & heat up some pita bread for my egg yolks. Great recipe, Mediterranean Dish!!

  • I just made this, it came out great, the eggs got well cooked, but I don’t mind, my guest loved it along with my homemade bread:) I think cumin makes everything taste better. Thank you for posting!

  • wow! This is very healthy dish. Thank for your video. I made my own version hope you can check it out.

    Please don’t forget to hit LIKE and SUBSCRIBE ��

  • Tried cooking this for the first time. It was tasty. Husband enjoyed it! Will need to cut the recipe in half next time for just the two of us.:)

  • I’ve had this dish a couple of times in Tel Aviv and fell in love with it. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I highly appreciate it ^_^ <3 And now my family will also.

  • Contrary to popular belief. This dish is not Mediterranean at first. It originated from Northern Africa “Maghreb”. It spread to Middle East and then Europe latter via Ottoman empire. Furthermore the name of this dish “Shakshouka” شَكْشُوكَةٌ is Tunisian Arabic vernacular which roughly translates to “Stick together”.

  • Carina, Where did you find your porcelain egg holder? It looks exotic and I would love to buy one. BTW I’ve enjoyed your video for Shakshuka. Thanks in advance!!

  • Hi..I really enjoy watching and learning new recipes..I’ve made lots of Mediterranean food but I’ve not made shakshuka yet..my brother is vegan so I’m going to try a vegan version of it this weekend. Are there any good vegan recipes that you can share?

  • Contrary to popular belief. This dish is not Mediterranean at first. It originated from Northern Africa “Maghreb”. It spread to Middle East and then Europe latter via Ottoman empire. Furthermore the name of this dish “Shakshouka” شَكْشُوكَةٌ is Tunisian Arabic vernacular which roughly translates to “Stick together”.

  • This is literally something I eat everyday in summer, you can add to your shakshuka chopped potatoes and zucchini, also you can have your eggs stirred in the pan with thes rest of the ingredients, so good really.

  • Oh my god, I love breakfast-type dishes and I love spicy dishes. I can’t wait to try this out! A quick question, though. How do you serve this? In a bowl? Or on a plate?

  • I used to think its way too refined for someone like me who doesnt have much experience in the kitchen but i guess im gonna give it a try soon!
    Thank you

  • This was the same way I made Shakshuka first time when I heard it is poached eggs in tomato. Just without seeing the recipe.

    I’m Indian. We make tomato curries like this. I didn’t put capsicum in my Shakshuka and added a little bit of ginger paste too. Otherwise it was same as this.

    I’m so glad and proud after watching this.

  • I just made your Shakshuka recipe and it was to die for!�� I couldn’t believe for so much food it was so little calories. Definitely becoming one of my staples.

  • I’ve had this dish a couple of times in Tel Aviv and fell in love with it. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. I highly appreciate it ^_^ <3 And now my family will also.

  • Hi, Carina. That dish looks absolutely gorgeous and elegant. You’ve struck it rich again. I am amazed at how well you’re progressing. You are truly AWESOME at cooking. I have a question: what’s your favorite vegetarian dish that you’ve ever made? Please let me know. Have a splendid week, Carina. By the way, I love your profile photo, so adorable.:) ������

  • I like ur recipe but the only mistake is you didn’t use butter at the beginning of this dish u only used oil…the original shakshuka containts butter…

  • I like ur recipe but the only mistake is you didn’t use butter at the beginning of this dish u only used oil…the original shakshuka containts butter…

  • I used to think its way too refined for someone like me who doesnt have much experience in the kitchen but i guess im gonna give it a try soon!
    Thank you

  • This video was almost therapeutic. Loved the music, written instructions, and visuals. Thank you. Just started making this dish. Think I’ll switch to your recipe.

  • This recipe is one of my favorites ❤️. I add some sliced kalamata olives after cooking & heat up some pita bread for my egg yolks. Great recipe, Mediterranean Dish!!

  • I just made this, it came out great, the eggs got well cooked, but I don’t mind, my guest loved it along with my homemade bread:) I think cumin makes everything taste better. Thank you for posting!

  • How low does the heat need to be for eggs to still be runny after 10-15 mins? I had it medium low and eggs were totally overcooked after 6 mins?
    I get mine must be too hot, but just wondering if people cook eggs for 15 mins or if this is overkill?

  • I made this recipe for breakfast this morning, 25th April 2019. It truly lived up to my expectations. A lovely taste. I could taste the capers which added a nice zing ��

  • Im loving all these hilarious comments here saying they all have it in their cuisine, with differnt languages but not ONE person spoke of the origin of the dish and the word, “Shakshouka”, not even the author..

    SHAKSHOUKA: is an EGYPTIAN BREAKFAST dish of origin.. no. Not indian or afghan or south american, it is Egyptian, and they have been doing this dish for CENTURIES… u can litteraly go to any Egyptian cafe and order this for breakfast…. also, the author of the video made it incorrect however he used most of the main ingredients

    SHAKSHOUKA: in Arabic (in Egyptian dialect ONLY)…… meaning Thorny, spicy, Hot! And the word is only used for the dish..

    There u have it.. the meaning and origin of SHAKSHOUKA

  • Hello Home Cooking Adventure! I hope this message finds you well. I am a producer at INSIDER and I recently found this amazing video and we would love to feature it in one of our videos about egg dishes around the world! For a little knowledge about us, INSIDER is a part of Business Insider. All of your footage will be credited with your Facebook, Instagram or YouTube page. 

    Please let me know if this is okay with you! You can also email me at [email protected] businessinsider.com

  • that is one of my favorite dishes..in Algeria we can add pepper..sush an amazing channel you’re presentation and how you cook.. just perfect ��Masha’allah

  • I made this recipe for breakfast this morning, 25th April 2019. It truly lived up to my expectations. A lovely taste. I could taste the capers which added a nice zing ��

  • Wow you really did it good! ���� I’m from Saudi Arabia and we do eat Shakshuka in our breakfast, but we mix the eggs we don’t leave it that way and make sure it cooked very well, you make hungry now i think i’ll make some. ����❤️❤️

  • Many cultures have a form of baked eggs/tomato sauce. I recently tried shakshuka (please forgive any misspelling)…baked eggs are the best.

  • Yum looks delicious i am making this soon can skip bell peppers as am not a big fan of them drooling over my samsung galaxy j4 love your recipes making me hungry Thanks Ramya