Know Your Fats

 

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Know Your Fats

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Know Your Fats: The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils and Cholesterol. Later Printing Used Edition. by. Mary G. Enig (Author) › Visit Amazon’s Mary G. Enig Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Monounsaturated Fats. Olive oil.

Canola (rapeseed) oil. Peanut oils. Most nuts (excluding walnuts), nut oils and nut butter (such as peanut butter) Olives.

Avocados. Know Your Fats Basics on Fats and Oils. Saturated Fats.

Do Saturated Fats and Trans Fats Cause Type-2 Diabetes? Cholesterol. Cholesterol: Friend Or Foe? Coconut Oil. Essential Fatty Acids.

Trans Fats. Industrial Fats and Oils. Know Your Fats Each fat has different characteristics and different effects on your health, however fat is ESSENTIAL to the structure of EVERY cell in your body!

Benefits of fat: they help protect your organs, help keep your body warm, help your body absorb some nutrients (like vitamins A, D, E, and K!) and produce important hormones too!Your Registered Dietitian can help you plan your meals with healthy eating tips such as how much fat you need each day, and how to fit it into your plan. Not All Fats Are Created Equal. Unsaturated fats are heart healthy fats.

You can find them in vegetable oils (like olive and canola oil), nuts, seeds, nut butters, avocado, olives, and fish. Use a tape measure to determine your waist, wrist, hip and forearm circumference. Then input your gender and measurements below to receive a body fat index based on average values.

The body fat index is not an indicator of fitness level since the calculation is made with no regard to height or weight. Fats are made up of chains of carbon atoms with a carboxyl (acid) group (COOH) at one end and a methyl groups (CH3) at the other end. Carbons are attached to each other and to hydrogen atoms – it’s the way the carbons are chained that differentiates saturated and unsaturated fats and impacts how our bodies process them. Contact Us. National Center 7272 Greenville Ave.

Dallas, TX 75231 Customer Service 1-800-AHA-USA-1 1-800-242-8721 Contact Us Hours Monday Friday: 7AM 9PM CST. ANSWER Fats are substances that help the body use some vitamins and keep the skin healthy; they are also the main way the body stores energy. In food, there are many types of fats

Foods containing “monounsaturated” and “polyunsaturated” fats are more beneficial to your health than foods high in “saturated” fats. Monounsaturated fats have single double bonds in their chemical structure (“mono” = “one”). Polyunsaturated oils have chemical structures with many double bonds (“poly”

List of related literature:

In addition to showing amounts of fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrate, fiber, sugar, and protein by weight, the Nutrition Facts label displays most of this information as percentages of the DVs for a 2,000-calorie diet.

“Alters and Schiff Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Jeff Housman, Mary Odum
from Alters and Schiff Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Jeff Housman, Mary Odum
Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC, 2015

Advising someone to consume a healthy eating pattern that limits saturated fats, trans fats, added sugars, and sodium is not helpful if the person does not know which foods are sources of these types of fats, sugars, or sodium.

“Biochemical, Physiological, and Molecular Aspects of Human Nutrition E-Book” by Martha H. Stipanuk, Marie A. Caudill
from Biochemical, Physiological, and Molecular Aspects of Human Nutrition E-Book
by Martha H. Stipanuk, Marie A. Caudill
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In order to reduce intake of total fat, individuals should choose diets which are high in vegetables, fruits, and grain products (particularly whole grain products), choose lean cuts of meats, fish, and poultry, substitute low-fat dairy products for higher fat products, and use fats and oils sparingly.

“Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) TITLE 21 Food and Drugs (1 April 2017)” by Office of the Federal Register (U.S.)
from Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) TITLE 21 Food and Drugs (1 April 2017)
by Office of the Federal Register (U.S.)
Office of the Federal Register, National Archives and Records Service, 2008

Most people can easily identify saturated fats.

“The Ketogenic Bible: The Authoritative Guide to Ketosis” by Jacob Wilson, Ryan Lowery
from The Ketogenic Bible: The Authoritative Guide to Ketosis
by Jacob Wilson, Ryan Lowery
Victory Belt Publishing, 2017

This is why “hard” fats, which contain long saturated fat molecules, are often used to create desirable textures in solid foods, like margarine, butter, cakes, cookies, and chocolate.

“Future Foods: How Modern Science Is Transforming the Way We Eat” by David Julian McClements
from Future Foods: How Modern Science Is Transforming the Way We Eat
by David Julian McClements
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Saturated fats are found in hard margarines, vegetable shortenings, pastries, crackers, fried foods, cheese, ice cream, and other processed foods.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book: Active Learning for Collaborative Practice” by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book: Active Learning for Collaborative Practice
by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Fats Provide food energy and the essential fatty acid; Vegetable oils, butter, whole milk and cream, carrier of fat-soluble vitamins, body structure, and margarine, lard, shortening, salad and cooking regulatory functions.

“Foods & Nutrition Encyclopedia, Two Volume Set” by Marion Eugene Ensminger, Audrey H. Ensminger
from Foods & Nutrition Encyclopedia, Two Volume Set
by Marion Eugene Ensminger, Audrey H. Ensminger
Taylor & Francis, 1993

Approximately 30% of our total energy should be derived from fat: with approximate ratios of 10% from saturated fat, 5% from polyunsaturated fats and 15% from monounsaturated fats.

“Bailliere's Nurses' Dictionary E-Book: for Nurses and Health Care Workers” by Barbara F. Weller
from Bailliere’s Nurses’ Dictionary E-Book: for Nurses and Health Care Workers
by Barbara F. Weller
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

The true fats (also called triglycerides) are an excellent source of energy.

“Concepts in Biology' 2007 Ed.2007 Edition” by Enger, Eldon Et Al
from Concepts in Biology’ 2007 Ed.2007 Edition
by Enger, Eldon Et Al
Rex Bookstore, Inc.,

Examples of these practical tips include: consuming more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and seafood; consumption of foods with less sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and refined grains; and an increase in daily physical activity.

“Nutrition” by Paul M. Insel, Don Ross, Kimberley McMahon, Melissa Bernstein
from Nutrition
by Paul M. Insel, Don Ross, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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  • If you sum up all these health tips you can safely say a
    VEGAN DIET is the best for your body!
    -no saturated fats
    -less processed food
    -no empty calories
    Try it:)