Bitter Melon – History, Uses, and Benefits

 

Karela, Momordica charantia or bitter melon and Benefits

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Bitter gourd seeds a potential cancer cure? rajagossip.com

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Ripe Bitter Melon Weird Fruit Explorer

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Karela (Bitter gourd) Health benefits & Medicinal uses | Bitter Fruit with Sweet Properties

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Is it true that bitter melon kills Breast Cancer cells? Dr. Chetali Samant

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Bitter Gourd Benefits and Side Effects

Video taken from the channel: YuHealthyCom


 

Bitter gourd seeds a potential cancer cure? rajagossip.com

Video taken from the channel: Raja Gossip


 

Ripe Bitter Melon Weird Fruit Explorer

Video taken from the channel: Weird Explorer


 

करेले के फायदे । Health benefits of Karela Bitter gourd | Hindi | Ms Pinky Madaan

Video taken from the channel: TsMadaan


 

6 Amazing Things Bitter Gourd Can Do To Your Body

Video taken from the channel: Natural Ways


 

Bitter Gourd Benefits and Side Effects

Video taken from the channel: YuHealthyCom


 

Karela (Bitter gourd) Health benefits & Medicinal uses | Bitter Fruit with Sweet Properties

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Vikram Chauhan


 

Is it true that bitter melon kills Breast Cancer cells? Dr. Chetali Samant

Video taken from the channel: Doctors’ Circle World’s Largest Health Platform


5 Health Benefits of Bitter Melon 1. Helps Balance Blood Sugar Levels. Both animal and human studies have found that bitter melon extract can reduce blood 2. Fights Viral and Bacterial Infections. Research shows that bitter melon contains several antibacterial and antiviral 3. Improves. Bitter Melon History, Uses, and Benefits — Tiger Fitness An extensive look at the benefits of bitter melon, a supplement ingredient that may be helpful for diabetes, weight loss, and more.

An extensive look at the benefits of bitter melon, a supplement ingredient that. Bitter melon is said to act as an antioxidant and to contain anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, antibacterial, anti-obesity, and immunomodulating properties. 1  Some believe that bitter melon may also combat cancer and promote weight loss.

There is not enough scientific evidence to. Bitter melon (also commonly called bitter gourd) is a sour, green fruit is commonly eaten in Asia and used around the world for its many medicinal properties. Benefits include increasing immunity, lowering diabetes symptoms, fighting free radical damage and inflammation, treating skin problems, improving digestion and helping to prevent cancer. Bitter melon is a vegetable used in India and other Asian countries. The fruit and seeds are used to make medicine.

People use bitter melon for diabetes, stomachand intestinal problems, to promote. Bitter melon is linked to lowering the body’s blood sugar. This is because the bitter melon has properties that act like insulin, which helps bring glucose into the cells for energy. The. The Fruit of Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) Therapeutic Benefits, Claims, and Uses of Bitter Melon In the Amazon, bitter melon is used in cooking and also as a medicine.

The fruit and the leaves are added to beans or soups for producing a bitter or sour flavor. However, bitter gourd does not increase Vata dosha. Bitter melon benefits these doshas when they’re aggravated. 2. Part of plant used and dosage: Fruit and whole plant.

3 with a dosage for Swarasa or fresh juice being 10-20 ml. 3. Read More: Why Good Ayurvedists Don’t Drink Smoothies. Bitter Melon Uses According to Dravyaguna Vijnana 2,3. Bitter melon is a source of key nutrients like Carbohydrates, Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, Folate, Potassium, Zinc, and iron.

Of all these, bitter melon has a high concentration of Vitamin C which is an important micronutrient helpful in disease prevention and. Bitter melon has been used in various African and Asian herbal medicine systems for centuries. Nowadays, it is being studied by modern medicine for its benefits, which include, but are not limited to: Lowers the level of blood sugar in the body.

Normalizes high blood pressure.

List of related literature:

This review focuses on recent advancements in cancer chemopreventive and anti-cancer efficacy of bitter melon and its active constituents.

“Issues in Pharmacology, Pharmacy, Drug Research, and Drug Innovation: 2011 Edition” by Q. Ashton Acton, PhD
from Issues in Pharmacology, Pharmacy, Drug Research, and Drug Innovation: 2011 Edition
by Q. Ashton Acton, PhD
ScholarlyEditions, 2012

Bitter melon is high in vitamin C, and also offers folate, potassium, zinc, and other nutrients.

“Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen: Recipes from the East for Health, Healing, and Long Life” by Yuan Wang, Warren Sheir, Mika Ono
from Ancient Wisdom, Modern Kitchen: Recipes from the East for Health, Healing, and Long Life
by Yuan Wang, Warren Sheir, Mika Ono
Hachette Books, 2010

different Two parts shade-dried of the bitter whole melon fruit equivalent plant (tablets to 1 prepared g three times from a day and capsules prepared from the plant fruits and seeds) ment in but glycaemic found no control statistically for bitter significant melon improveover the placebo.

“Herbs and Natural Supplements, Volume 2: An Evidence-Based Guide” by Lesley Braun, Marc Cohen
from Herbs and Natural Supplements, Volume 2: An Evidence-Based Guide
by Lesley Braun, Marc Cohen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

The range of pharmacological activities reported for bitter melon is rapidly increasing in recent years and its claimed uses and potential applications for cancer and other diseases have been extensively reviewed (e.g., Grover and Yadav, 2004).

“Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes and Associated Diseases: The Chemical and Pharmacological Basis of their Action” by Solomon Habtemariam
from Medicinal Foods as Potential Therapies for Type-2 Diabetes and Associated Diseases: The Chemical and Pharmacological Basis of their Action
by Solomon Habtemariam
Elsevier Science, 2019

Fresh or cured, the kernel of the seed—an astringent, red-orange drupe (colloquially, “nut”)—is chewed with the leaves, stems, or catkins of betel pepper (Piper betle, a shrubby vine), slaked lime, and flavorings.

“The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: Australia and the Pacific Islands” by J.W. Love, Adrienne Kaeppler
from The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: Australia and the Pacific Islands
by J.W. Love, Adrienne Kaeppler
Taylor & Francis, 2017

Bitter melon also increases blood levels of key antioxidants, notably glutathione and superoxide dismutase.

“The New Healing Herbs: The Essential Guide to More Than 130 of Nature's Most Potent Herbal Remedies” by Michael Castleman
from The New Healing Herbs: The Essential Guide to More Than 130 of Nature’s Most Potent Herbal Remedies
by Michael Castleman
Rodale Books, 2017

Native to southern Asia and an important ingredient in Asian cuisine, bitter melon is cultivated in warm-weather regions throughout the world.

“Prescription for Herbal Healing” by Phyllis A. Balch
from Prescription for Herbal Healing
by Phyllis A. Balch
Avery, 2002

Overall, bitter melon is considered quite safe and has been used as a food for decades.

“Nutraceuticals: Efficacy, Safety and Toxicity” by Ramesh C. Gupta
from Nutraceuticals: Efficacy, Safety and Toxicity
by Ramesh C. Gupta
Elsevier Science, 2016

Moulehi et al. (2012) reported that the seeds of mandarin and bitter orange are considered valuable, as they provide components with potential for industrial and pharmacological applications as antioxidants.

“Food Processing: Strategies for Quality Assessment” by Abdul Malik, Zerrin Erginkaya, Saghir Ahmad, Hüseyin Erten
from Food Processing: Strategies for Quality Assessment
by Abdul Malik, Zerrin Erginkaya, et. al.
Springer New York, 2014

Bitter is often better when it comes to health benefits, and the bioactives of this melon that are responsible for its taste have been shown to kill colon cancer and breast cancer cells, lower cholesterol, and improve blood sugar levels in diabetes.4 This is not a vegetable for you to

“Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself” by William W Li
from Eat to Beat Disease: The New Science of How Your Body Can Heal Itself
by William W Li
Grand Central Publishing, 2019

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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74 comments

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  • best natural bitter gourd capsules
    for more info. please visit this link
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/173833843818

    don’t miss this valuable chance

  • Mam..I am going to married after two months.Can drinking bitter juice improve my complexion.How much glass should i take per day n till when should i stop drinking.Thanks ��

  • to eat bitter melon raw or pickle I also make it with scrambled eggs or whatever fool dat I want it to be in I’ll try to put more than less cuz I love the bitterness if it’s beneficial for me cuz I’m 71 years old I think it would help me out also might make me look younger bless all of you for this video thank you

  • That’s interesting. Even though I have grown bitter melon, I have never seen it ripe. I guess maybe we harvested all of them early.

  • Cholesterol does not cause plaques to form in arteries and does not cause heart disease. This is a myth that has been around for decades. So if bitter melon does lower cholesterol levels it’s irrelevant to your health really.

  • Hi ma’am ;
    Good evening!!!
    Ma’am I have on question that can I use bitter guard for Boils cure bcz I ate a lot of allopathic medicine and now I’m suffering from boils.
    Would you suggest me that can I use bitter guard juice morning and as well as evening as home remedy???
    Thanks!!!

  • First I don’t like it but after hearing all the benefits I start eating it even if I don’t like it. After time i got used to the taste and know i like it especially with a Omelett with tomato onion and butter melon it’s self

  • Coming from a cultural background that consumes this on a daily/weekly basis, and as a chef/food scientist, we prefer it when its a breaker/turning (light green with a taint of yellow, happens before turning complete yellow but started changing away from the dark green) because it has the best balance of texture and bitterness. Green ones has a firm texture but strong bitterness, while yellow ripe ones are spongy and mushy but less bitterness with a hint of sweetness. The optimum turning ones has more use and are eaten raw or braised/fried/stir-fried/stuffed/soup etc, while the yellow ripe ones are only limited to be used in juices and occasionally in soup and eaten raw.

  • My parents still grow a lot of bitter melon to sell at local stores near them. We would only let a few if them ripen to save for seed. The ripe ones would always freak me out as a kid because they were so crimson red, like blood.

  • First I don’t like it but after hearing all the benefits I start eating it even if I don’t like it. After time i got used to the taste and know i like it especially with a Omelett with tomato onion and butter melon it’s self

  • When I ate bitter gourd I followed an online recipe and scraped out the seeds and are the flesh after cooking. Did you try cooking the ripe one later?

  • Mam, I have been taking the bitter gourd juice every day. My question is if I should have the juice empty stomach or if I can still have it after drinking water (about one ltr) in the morning. Thank you very much.

  • That’s interesting. Even though I have grown bitter melon, I have never seen it ripe. I guess maybe we harvested all of them early.

  • this is helpful and very interesting. thank you! in the philippines we saute the unripe bitter gourds as a vegetable dish. it’s really delicious!

  • shudder I ate bitter melon with daalbhat every day for weeks while living in a small village in Nepal where I was working on my field research for my master’s degree; you eat what’s in season. It was prepared with onion, potato & cumin etc. it’s still bitter no matter how it’s cooked. Sure, it’s good for you but it’s definitely an acquired taste. Me, I just eat what’s put in front of me and get in with it.

  • One of the best meals I’ve ever had was a bitter melon beef dish from a restaurant in Berkeley. I’m a big fan of bitter for the most part. The only bitter thing I think is too bitter for my taste is bile…which you mainly get when eating improperly handled/harvested livers.

  • seeing the inside of those ripe ones takes me straight back to being 11, coming back from vacation and seeing the burst-open ripe bitter melons in our garden! so disgusting! ��

  • Cholesterol does not cause plaques to form in arteries and does not cause heart disease. This is a myth that has been around for decades. So if bitter melon does lower cholesterol levels it’s irrelevant to your health really.

  • My mum slices the unripe ones into thin discs and adds them into the braised beef in black-bean sauce… cooks it for another ten minutes and garnishes with diced birds-eye chillis. One of my favourite dishes. Cooked bitter melon is hardly bitter… like steamed artichoke heart.

    Other bitter melon recipes include bitter melon and pork soup, stuffed bitter melon (with mince or fish paste), and bitter melon omelet.

    If it weren’t for the coronavirus restrictions, I’d be at the Asian markets buying some right now.

  • Usually cooked unripe. Stirfried is the best way to cook it just add eggs to it and its done and one thing we dont cook the ripe ones because its soggy and also i had no idea that the seeds inside it can be eaten when its ripe. Thanks to that information now im dying to know for my self what kind of taste it has.thank you im watching your channel from the philippines.

  • I just googled to find out what balsam apples were since i used to pick them and eat the seeds as a kid, and this looked like one so i figueed it was related. and they said the ripe orange ones cause vomiting, maybe the rind does bc ive eaten tons of the seeds with no problem. Shouldve just waited til u mentioned it lol.

  • There’s wee,small ones growing all over where I am in Thailand. My gal will pick the green ones to make Nam Prik (hot sauce/dipping sauce) but she just laughed when I asked her about eating the ripe ones.

  • Bitter melon? We call “Ampalaya”, one of the most COMMON VEGETABLES in our country it’s found everywhere..If it’s poison then only a rare few Filipino would be alive today, including me.. they say it’s SO NUTRITIOUS, but i don’t eat it cause I can’t stand it’s bitterness.. Usually eaten UNRIPE and cooked.. I didn’t know it can be eaten ripe and raw? we only let it ripen for the seeds so we can plant it..

  • Down here in florida we have little wild bitter gourds… i hate them because they spread like crazy and can take over my peach tree FAST

  • I’d like to see you try medlars next. One of the few fruit that needs to rot (technically blet, but bletting is just a specific kind of rotting) before being edible. They taste like smoked apple jam. The tricky bit is to get them fully rotted before they start drying out (and avoiding mold during the process).

  • बहुत खूब, पूर्ण रूप से विवरण दिया।
    मेरे चेहरे पर बांये तरफ पिगमेंटेशन त्वचा की गहराई तक है क्या यह जूस लाभकारी रहेगा। मैंने भी पुदीने की कुछ पत्तियां डाल कर पानी मिलाकर पीना शुरू कर दिया है। एक सप्ताह से

  • Usually cooked unripe. Stirfried is the best way to cook it just add eggs to it and its done and one thing we dont cook the ripe ones because its soggy and also i had no idea that the seeds inside it can be eaten when its ripe. Thanks to that information now im dying to know for my self what kind of taste it has.thank you im watching your channel from the philippines.

  • When I ate bitter gourd I followed an online recipe and scraped out the seeds and are the flesh after cooking. Did you try cooking the ripe one later?

  • I remember watching a Japanese drama Nagi’s Long Vacation, and a character was eating ripe bitter melons. She also said it was sweet.

  • If anyone want to try this, just go to your near asian market and dig around and occasionally, in the bitter gourd piles, you can find a slightly ripe ones. Or look in the discount section. Thats how I found a ripe one.

  • I had a dish at an Indian restaurant once that was the most bitter, poisonous tasting thing I’ve ever had. It was a side dish that looked like pickled veggies, but tasted so strong and alkaline that I almost couldn’t finish the rest of the meal. Was that bitter melon???

  • It’s believed to be good for diabetes. We here in Pakistan cut them into small pieces, season with salt leave for sometime then wash(to remove some of bitterness) and fry till cooked and brownish then mix with meat cooked with lots of onion and tomatoes. Sometimes without meat with potatoes or split chickpeas.

  • shudder I ate bitter melon with daalbhat every day for weeks while living in a small village in Nepal where I was working on my field research for my master’s degree; you eat what’s in season. It was prepared with onion, potato & cumin etc. it’s still bitter no matter how it’s cooked. Sure, it’s good for you but it’s definitely an acquired taste. Me, I just eat what’s put in front of me and get in with it.

  • Always amazes me how folk legends come about on edibility without much reason. Especially for things culturally eaten for centuries.

  • Oh. You arent eating the actual flesh, just the part surrounding the seeds. Nevermind. I thought you were going to eat the regular part.

  • My mum slices the unripe ones into thin discs and adds them into the braised beef in black-bean sauce… cooks it for another ten minutes and garnishes with diced birds-eye chillis. One of my favourite dishes. Cooked bitter melon is hardly bitter… like steamed artichoke heart.

    Other bitter melon recipes include bitter melon and pork soup, stuffed bitter melon (with mince or fish paste), and bitter melon omelet.

    If it weren’t for the coronavirus restrictions, I’d be at the Asian markets buying some right now.

  • mam I have chronic bronchitis. I have told Karela juice treats it. is it true?
    And can take Its juice after taking garlic mixed with honey and ginger in the morning in empty stomach.

  • What an interesting horror movie practical effect you’ve discovered right thar. I’m imagining that’s what the inside of a Skeksi looks like.

  • yeah I’ve grown these to the ripe stage and when I showed my mom (who I grew them for since she eats them like crazy) she had no idea they turn like this

  • I think it’s the level of oxalate is a bit higher in ripe bitter melon. Cooking would bring that level down. You usually don’t want to eat it raw. Oxalate prevents your body from absorbing minerals and in some people will cause kidney stones.

  • the balsam apple, the plant we call Cerasee in my country, i use to eat one ripe one every morning after brushing my teeth to see if they were properly cleaned. if there were red stains on your teeth after, then you need to brush again. i have never tried the bitter melon before but i have seen it a lot since coming to the US. i am guessing that it’s not so different from the balsam apple though.

  • best natural bitter gourd capsules
    for more info. please visit this link
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/173833843818

    don’t miss this valuable chance

  • There’s wee,small ones growing all over where I am in Thailand. My gal will pick the green ones to make Nam Prik (hot sauce/dipping sauce) but she just laughed when I asked her about eating the ripe ones.

  • to eat bitter melon raw or pickle I also make it with scrambled eggs or whatever fool dat I want it to be in I’ll try to put more than less cuz I love the bitterness if it’s beneficial for me cuz I’m 71 years old I think it would help me out also might make me look younger bless all of you for this video thank you

  • Mam मैम मैं रोजाना सुबह शाम तीन-चार करेले कच्चे ही खाता हूं बीजों सहित तो बीजों के कोई नुकसान तो नहीं है ना मैं टाइप वन डायबिटीज पेशेंट हूं तो सारी सब्जियां कच्ची ही खाता हूं

  • Coming from a cultural background that consumes this on a daily/weekly basis, and as a chef/food scientist, we prefer it when its a breaker/turning (light green with a taint of yellow, happens before turning complete yellow but started changing away from the dark green) because it has the best balance of texture and bitterness. Green ones has a firm texture but strong bitterness, while yellow ripe ones are spongy and mushy but less bitterness with a hint of sweetness. The optimum turning ones has more use and are eaten raw or braised/fried/stir-fried/stuffed/soup etc, while the yellow ripe ones are only limited to be used in juices and occasionally in soup and eaten raw.

  • this is helpful and very interesting. thank you! in the philippines we saute the unripe bitter gourds as a vegetable dish. it’s really delicious!

  • You can find this thing ripe in turkish farmers market. Like you said probably an old lady selling it and interesting fact is we don’t use it unripe. Ripe bitter melon or “kudret narı(turkish name)” yellow part has value rather than seeds or green. I don’t know any recipe about it, i am not fan of this thing but what i know is usually people mix it which oil to flavour the oil.

  • One of the best meals I’ve ever had was a bitter melon beef dish from a restaurant in Berkeley. I’m a big fan of bitter for the most part. The only bitter thing I think is too bitter for my taste is bile…which you mainly get when eating improperly handled/harvested livers.

  • In japan, when i visited every summer to meet my grandma, This thing was everywhere! It’s growing along the streets, children grow it for school projects, growing in little farm plots, and sold in the market. In Japan we call it ごや or Goya like the food brand. I personally hate it, but i’ve always thought the melon was already ripe when green. Never thought it wasn’t ripe.

  • मैडम
    1:करेला का जूस पीने से किडनी खराब होती है, क्या (डॉक्टर का कहना है) कृपया बताइये

    2:BP, थायराड, सुगर वाले खाली पेट करेला का जूस पी सकते हैं, कोई नुकसान तो नही होगी।

  • I just googled to find out what balsam apples were since i used to pick them and eat the seeds as a kid, and this looked like one so i figueed it was related. and they said the ripe orange ones cause vomiting, maybe the rind does bc ive eaten tons of the seeds with no problem. Shouldve just waited til u mentioned it lol.

  • Down here in florida we have little wild bitter gourds… i hate them because they spread like crazy and can take over my peach tree FAST

  • I remember watching a Japanese drama Nagi’s Long Vacation, and a character was eating ripe bitter melons. She also said it was sweet.

  • the balsam apple, the plant we call Cerasee in my country, i use to eat one ripe one every morning after brushing my teeth to see if they were properly cleaned. if there were red stains on your teeth after, then you need to brush again. i have never tried the bitter melon before but i have seen it a lot since coming to the US. i am guessing that it’s not so different from the balsam apple though.

  • You can find this thing ripe in turkish farmers market. Like you said probably an old lady selling it and interesting fact is we don’t use it unripe. Ripe bitter melon or “kudret narı(turkish name)” yellow part has value rather than seeds or green. I don’t know any recipe about it, i am not fan of this thing but what i know is usually people mix it which oil to flavour the oil.

  • seeing the inside of those ripe ones takes me straight back to being 11, coming back from vacation and seeing the burst-open ripe bitter melons in our garden! so disgusting! ��

  • I’d like to see you try medlars next. One of the few fruit that needs to rot (technically blet, but bletting is just a specific kind of rotting) before being edible. They taste like smoked apple jam. The tricky bit is to get them fully rotted before they start drying out (and avoiding mold during the process).

  • My parents still grow a lot of bitter melon to sell at local stores near them. We would only let a few if them ripen to save for seed. The ripe ones would always freak me out as a kid because they were so crimson red, like blood.

  • In japan, when i visited every summer to meet my grandma, This thing was everywhere! It’s growing along the streets, children grow it for school projects, growing in little farm plots, and sold in the market. In Japan we call it ごや or Goya like the food brand. I personally hate it, but i’ve always thought the melon was already ripe when green. Never thought it wasn’t ripe.

  • Hi,Thank You,good inf, People eat this fruit every day like a vegetable, but I going to drink with other sweet fruit and Haney one glass a day,

    Thank You.

  • Boil the unripe gourd with some salt until tender, and it will have a deep umami taste behind the bitterness. Best served with coconut urap.

  • Hi,Thank You,good inf, People eat this fruit every day like a vegetable, but I going to drink with other sweet fruit and Haney one glass a day,

    Thank You.

  • I had a dish at an Indian restaurant once that was the most bitter, poisonous tasting thing I’ve ever had. It was a side dish that looked like pickled veggies, but tasted so strong and alkaline that I almost couldn’t finish the rest of the meal. Was that bitter melon???

  • Oh. You arent eating the actual flesh, just the part surrounding the seeds. Nevermind. I thought you were going to eat the regular part.

  • Bitter melon? We call “Ampalaya”, one of the most COMMON VEGETABLES in our country it’s found everywhere..If it’s poison then only a rare few Filipino would be alive today, including me.. they say it’s SO NUTRITIOUS, but i don’t eat it cause I can’t stand it’s bitterness.. Usually eaten UNRIPE and cooked.. I didn’t know it can be eaten ripe and raw? we only let it ripen for the seeds so we can plant it..

  • Always amazes me how folk legends come about on edibility without much reason. Especially for things culturally eaten for centuries.

  • Boil the unripe gourd with some salt until tender, and it will have a deep umami taste behind the bitterness. Best served with coconut urap.

  • It’s believed to be good for diabetes. We here in Pakistan cut them into small pieces, season with salt leave for sometime then wash(to remove some of bitterness) and fry till cooked and brownish then mix with meat cooked with lots of onion and tomatoes. Sometimes without meat with potatoes or split chickpeas.

  • You are as pretty as your series of video.People get lots of knowledge out of it and bless you. Lots of love and blessings from my family. Keep it up

  • What an interesting horror movie practical effect you’ve discovered right thar. I’m imagining that’s what the inside of a Skeksi looks like.

  • yeah I’ve grown these to the ripe stage and when I showed my mom (who I grew them for since she eats them like crazy) she had no idea they turn like this

  • I think it’s the level of oxalate is a bit higher in ripe bitter melon. Cooking would bring that level down. You usually don’t want to eat it raw. Oxalate prevents your body from absorbing minerals and in some people will cause kidney stones.

  • If anyone want to try this, just go to your near asian market and dig around and occasionally, in the bitter gourd piles, you can find a slightly ripe ones. Or look in the discount section. Thats how I found a ripe one.