Barley and Provencal Vegetables in Vinaigrette

 

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Barley and Provencal Vegetables in Vinaigrette Barley and Provencal Vegetables in Vinaigrette. Ingredients. Directions. In a small pot, bring 2 cups (475ml) water to a boil, then add the barley. Return to a boil, then cover Serves: 6 | Serving Size: 1 1/3 cups.

Nutrition (per serving):. In a large pot, bring stock to a boil. add barley and cook on medium heat 40 minutes. Drain and rinse until cool. In a large bowl place all the vegetables, mix in the vinaigrette along with salt and pepper to taste. Combine with the barley.

Directions. In a large saucepan, saute zucchini and carrot in butter until crisp-tender. Add broth; bring to a boil. Stir in barley.

Reduce heat; cover and simmer until barley is tender, 10-12 minutes. Stir in the onions, marjoram, salt and pepper. Place pearl barley and 2 1/2 cups (591 ml) water in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil, then turn heat down to low.

Cover and cook for 40 to 45 minutes or until the barley is cooked through (should be tender but maintains some chew.) While barley is cooking, place diced vegetables (zucchini, bell peppers. Heat the oil in a large skillet, and add the onion, zucchini, and garlic. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the zucchini is just tender and the onions are wilted, 8 minutes.

Add the broth and cook 2 minutes more. Next, add the tomatoes and salt and pepper. Combine barley, tomato, olives and herbes de Provence in a medium bowl. Provencal barley recipe.

Learn how to cook great Provencal barley. Crecipe.com deliver fine selection of quality Provencal barley recipes equipped with ratings, reviews and mixing tips. Get one of our Provencal barley recipe and prepare delicious and healthy treat for your family or friends. Good appetite!

In a large saucepan of salted boiling water, cook the barley over moderate heat until slightly tender, about 30 minutes. Drain and quickly rinse the barley under running water to cool it. 3/4 cup chopped onion (about 1 small) 1 garlic clove, minced. 3/4 cup uncooked pearl barley. 1 3/4 cups Homemade Chicken Stock.

1 1/2 cups chopped zucchini (about 1) 1 1/2 cups halved cherry tomatoes. 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt. 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. 2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese. Make bigger batches and keep in your fridge for 3 days; warm 1 cup of the mixture with 1/4 cup of milk or a non-dairy beverage.

Simply cook the barley in water, pear nectar, brown sugar, honey, cinnamon, and salt. Add cranberries and lemon juice and let cook.

List of related literature:

Place 1 cup diced onion the barley in a medium stockpot, with 4 quarts of 1/2 cup minced green water, and the pork meat, ribs, onion, green onion, onion* garlic, bay leaves, bouillon cube, salt, pepper, 4 cloves garlic, minced and color.

“Secrets of Colombian Cooking” by Patricia McCausland-Gallo
from Secrets of Colombian Cooking
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When the barley is done, stir in the Parmesan cheese and 3 tablespoons of the parsley.

“The Vegetarian Planet: 350 Big-Flavor Recipes for Out-Of-This-World Food Every Day” by Didi Emmons
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Add barley, nectarines, tomatoes, green onions, and mint to dressing in bowl; stir gently until mixed and coated with dressing.

“The Good Housekeeping Cookbook” by Susan Westmoreland
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While the barley cooked, we sautéed chopped fennel and onion, then folded this mixture into the barley along with pine nuts, Parmesan, and herbs.

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America’s Test Kitchen, 2015

Add the barley, black beans, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and 11⁄2 tablespoons parsley.

“The Doctors Book of Food Remedies: The Latest Findings on the Power of Food to Treat and Prevent Health Problems From Aging and Diabetes to Ulcers and Yeast Infections” by Selene Yeager, Editors of Prevention
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Rodale Books, 2008

Scoop the barley mixture into a large bowl, add the scallion-apricot-hazelnut mixture in the center, and pour the dressing over all.

“Cooking with the Bible: Biblical Food, Feasts, and Lore” by Anthony F. Chiffolo, Rayner W. Hesse
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In this rendition (which anyone will want to have more often), the barley is cooked in broth, mixed with a few colorful vegetables, and finished with freshly grated lemon zest.

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HMH Books, 2010

BARLEY WITH VEGETABLES 1 cup barley, soaked • Sauté vegetables (optional).

“Healing with Whole Foods: Asian Traditions and Modern Nutrition” by Paul Pitchford
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North Atlantic Books, 2002

Put the barley in with the softened vegetables, plus 1} litres (24 pt) beef stock, and complete the recipe as above.

“Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book” by Jane Grigson, Yvonne Skargon
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UNP Bison Books, 2007

Add the lentils, the sauteed onion, the remaining 9 tablespoons of oil, the barley, dry soup mix, sesame seeds, cumin seeds, paprika, celery, garlic, and crushed bouillon cubes to the beans in the cooker; stir to combine.

“Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Cookbook” by Beth Hensperger, Julie Kaufmann
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Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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48 comments

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  • I feel the same way about my coffee and I can’t stand cilantro. The taste is so strong it over powers what ever you put it in or on.

  • Hi Beth, I just wonder when I watch your clip, it seems like the fish is cooked for a minute on seasoned side and be flipped then turn on the heat. But in the About says cook the seasoned side for 3 4 minutes. It confuses me a bit cause this is real-time recipe

  • Thank you, Stephane! I’ve been looking for an authentic Aioli sauce to serve with jumbo lump crab as an appetizer!! I’ve got to try this!!

  • I avoid fish like the plague but I might have to give this recipe a whirl. Especially for the sake of my husband. He would love it!

  • Nice platter. I suggest to add the skin of a whole peeled lemon to the pan with the white vegetables. it will reduce the smell from the cauliflower, and keep the whiteness on the veg. Keep posting these nice recipes. Greetings from Greece.

  • Hello, I thought your video was excellent. It was straightforward and unpretentious and that is how cooking videos should be. The problem with celebrity chefs is that they show off. They want to impress and prove to people how clever they are but they fail to communicate. Please do a lot more videos Beth.

  • On 16th question couldn’t the answer also be D? She says “you’re full of difficult questions THIS AFTERNOON, aren’t you?”, which mean on other days the student doesn’t have that many questions. Also, I have a reason for why C is wrong: the teacher CAN answer the questions the students gave her, so while they might be hard, I don’t think they are CHALLENGING for her.

  • This took over 4 hours to make. I ended up exhausted, but it was pleasant and tasty. There was a well combined mix of flavors, it tasted salted, sweet and spicy, all at the same time, aside from the flavors of every ingredient. I have to stress texture as well, I think onions make the difference here, their “al dente” texture gave it a pleasant feeling with that crunchy touch. Have to say I just gave it 1 hour in a stove top baking pot.

    By the way, it’s also kids friendly, since mine are picky when it comes to eating vegetables, but this time they ate them without hesitation. Just make sure you don’t you don’t put too much spicy ingredients in it.

    @CoolCooking: Thanks for the recipe, this was a pleasant and unexpected experience despite the hard work.

  • JOEL, YOU MAY NOT BE AWARE OF an animated french movie called ratatouille, but it introduced my grand daughters to cooking, i only let them watch child friendly shows like yours and several others but they love it, and i love the recipe.ty

  • Nice video, to the point, food looks tasty. So far so good.
    Served in a tea cup on a saucer. No.
    In the same way that drinks don’t belong in jam jars, and chips (fries) don’t belong in mini metal buckets or wire baskets.

  • When spanish people see this our first reactions are: 1. That’s a spanish sauce you illiterate frenchman! and 2. Only such an obnoxious frenchman such als yourself would make it all wrong and put Egg in it!!
    Well, I commend all people that come from my country to chill, accept that in southern france they also discovered that emulsifying garlic is delicious, that they call it the same way, and that we should all be grateful to the french, if not for the vast culinary, philosofical, literary,ETC culture they have created and shared with the world, then at least for uniting Europe around mockery towards them.
    As long as its in good fun I’m all in.
    (Spanish “hate” french bc of historical reasons,also their 90s governments resistance against Spain entering the EU. The worst thing is that they dont hate us back because apparently we were too insignificant to hate, which is weird because we had capes and really cool hats.)

  • Hi Beth. I really love your website and instructions, but it is IMPOSSIBLE for me to find the written recipes after I watch your videos. Very frustrating.

  • Can’t wait to try it, my family loved vegetables! I might add pasta to this �� maybe homemade cavatelli like I made yesterday ❤️����

  • Hi Beth, i love your videos and how you organize your meals. Can you suggest something to treat our guests in the afternoon, not lunch, not too much like dinner. Just something light and fun to try…thankss

  • I made this tonight and we loved it. I used olive oil because there’s no frying. I don’t think any stage reaches smoking point. Anyway thank you for the amazing and easy recipe

  • Hi Beth, I’m going to live in a 3rd world country for the month of May and was wondering if you have any recipes that are cheap and quick that you could share with me (I have no oven:-() and more exotic ingredients are hard to come by. Btw. Loved your salad dressing video!

  • Magnifique vidéo, et très belle recette. En France, ce plat s’appel un ”tian”, très proche de la ratatouille mais plus raffiné ��

  • Hello lady you are narrating 80 miles an hour, you got to slow down to 45-50 miles, so thay oldies could follow what you are saying…. hope you dont mind my comments.

  • Made it tonight. Did NOT use coconut way to high in saturated fat, used olive oil. On a scale of 1-10 I give this a 12+. Excellent, simple & quick to make. We loved it. Served with some warmed over Minnesota wild rice. Perfect meal.

  • Hi Beth, I can totally use a “impress the in-law” meal set! Something impressive, easy to prep before hand and non fussy…I tend to get nervous and things go wrong in the kitchen! Thank you:)

  • Hello, I thought your video was excellent. It was straightforward and unpretentious and that is how cooking videos should be. The problem with celebrity chefs is that they show off. They want to impress and prove to people how clever they are but they fail to communicate. Please do a lot more videos Beth.

  • i did an extensive research up to the point of asking a chemist about smoking point for cooking oils, and it’s not as simple as most people make it out to be. To begin, the tables you find on internet, wikipedia to mention one, are completely wrong. Secondly, the same oil might have different smoking point: for example extra virgin olive oil might have a very variable smoking point based on when the olives were gathered (how ripe) and even the variety of olives makes a difference. Anyway, it’s better NOT to use extra virgin olive oil for high temperature cooking, because you waste many of the great nutrients that you get if you consume it uncooked. Normal olive oil on the other hand has a very high smoking point, even higher than most vegetable/seed oils, and it’s one of the safest to use. Coconut oil smoking point is not very high as opposed to what “someone” told you, and it varies as well based on the type of coconut oil. As a rule of thumb, the most refined an oil is, the highest the smoking point. So… long story short, it’s kind of complicated and i am trying to get this chemist friend to do a write up on this matter.

  • Ive been eating healthy and I love it. I also love this meal that you are making and i must know. I may be missing something. But what kind of fish did you use?

  • Truly you cook very well. Cooking videos in this busy life, when the time is big, do not like to see again.
    But your cooking, recipe and three minutes of video are really awesome!!!!
    Many good wishes are there.
    ������������������������

  • Hey Joel, do you have a Caponata recipe you can share? I’ve been on a kick, it’s one of my favorite summer dishes to make, thanks!

  • In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little, yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face, is that in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new*. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations. The new needs friends. Last night, I experienced something new: an extraordinary meal from a singularly unexpected source. To say that both the meal and its maker have challenged my preconceptions about fine cooking is a gross understatement. They have rocked me to my core. In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau’s famous motto, “Anyone can cook.” But I realize, only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist; but a great artist *can come from *anywhere*. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau’s, who is, in this critic’s opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteau’s soon, hungry for more.

  • These videos are fantastic! I’m a college student and all my friends are hopeless in a kitchen so whenever i get cooking they come running. These videos are easy to follow even for a relative noobie like me:)

  • How would you serve this? As a starter? Just as a meal on its own for lunch or dinner? How much of each veg should one person eat?

  • Ive been eating healthy and I love it. I also love this meal that you are making and i must know. I may be missing something. But what kind of fish did you use?

  • I love this recipe in fact I love all your recipes  when I saw the picture  first I thought it was lasagne but it is much more better thank you vivianne

  • The only problem with coconut oil is that, depending on the brand, it can really invade the dish with its flavor. It can be bothersome to some.

  • Hi Beth, i love your videos and how you organize your meals. Can you suggest something to treat our guests in the afternoon, not lunch, not too much like dinner. Just something light and fun to try…thankss

  • Stephane, really cool, cool show!
    I realize that this is closely related to the Salade Nicoise.
    Check out this ‘family’ recipe I got from my friend Gérard of Paris-unbelievably good!
    The TUNA prep is key, in my opinion.
    SALADE NICOISE ‘GERARD’ – (serving per plate; or arrange quantities of these on a large platter or in a huge bowl)
    A bed of very fresh mesclun
    1 ripe sliced tomato remove the seeds
    ½ red onion thinly sliced
    1 scallion cut with scissors
    1 small cucumber – remove the seeds, sliced in small dices
    1/3 red bell pepper sliced in long strips
    Small yellow leaf of celery heart
    2 red radish thinly sliced
    1 baby violet artichoke trimmed it raw, soaked in lemon juice and thinly sliced
    2 anchovy filets remove the bones
    1 chunk of homemade tuna in oil see below
    1 hard boiled egg
    Few black olives from Nice
    Extra virgin olive oil, Xérès vinegar (Vilux), sea salt and pepper
    On a plate dress with art on a bed of fresh mesclun all the ingredients. Make the dressing, pour nicely with a spoon on the ingredients. Do not toss. Serve immediately.
    -HOMEMADE TUNA IN OIL
    The day before. In a large deep pan bring water to boil. Add laurel leaf, fresh thyme, sliced yellow onion, parsley, garlic, salt and pepper. Keep boiling for 15’. Turn off the heat. Then water should not boil. Add a large & thick steak of tuna to the broth. Wait 10 to 20 minutes according to the size of the steak. Tuna should be pink. Drain and place carefully the tuna on a plate. Dry it with paper. Then in place it in a jar. Pour cold extra virgin olive oil to cover it. Add to the jar a laurel leaf, cooked onion and garlic, a sprig of fresh thyme, all pepper and ½ chile pepper. Keep until day after – no fridge.

  • Can’t wait to try it, my family loved vegetables! I might add pasta to this �� maybe homemade cavatelli like I made yesterday ❤️����

  • Hi Beth, I just wonder when I watch your clip, it seems like the fish is cooked for a minute on seasoned side and be flipped then turn on the heat. But in the About says cook the seasoned side for 3 4 minutes. It confuses me a bit cause this is real-time recipe

  • I just made this and served with the bread. Fabulous! This will be a staple in our household. Everything except the garlic and peppers came from our garden, even the bay leaves. I used both fresh and dried thyme. Thank you!!!!

  • I agree with everything Ina said except cilantro! I love cilantro! But I know it’s one of those flavors that you either love or hate.

  • Was looking for a great cod recipe that didn’t have butter or bread crumbs. Tried this, and it was a great! I’m a chiropractor, and the nutritional value in this is good for anyone on an autoimmune protocol diet. The coconut oil has medium chain triglycerides which are good for your nervous system. Tasty and a winner in my book. 5 stars if I could rate it.

  • Amazing, one of your best. Thanks so much for posting, I must try this. French cooking making a major comeback after all these years, thanks to you Stephane

  • A little tip from a chemistry student (and amateur cook):
    The lemon juice instead of wine is a good tip if you don’t have any Wine at home, but using it to cook is not harmful or anything for health, since the Alcohol will eventually evaporate as the sauce starts boiling since it’s evaporation temperature is about 10°C and it’s ebollition point is 78.4 °C (351,5 K) So basically no Alcohol will be served in your meal and the flavor will be supreme. Hope it helped:)

  • Hi madam Beth
    I REALLY LOVE YOUR VIDEOS! IM LEARNING! HAHA
    IM JUST 16 YRs.old girl FROM PHILIPPINES
    I always watching your videos everynight. Keep it up! Why do some Filipino dish? Like “Adobo”? Its very delicious! Superb! Godbless you! Your such an inspiration to me! ����

  • Just a bit of a beauty tip, Coconut oil is also great for hair. It’s great for when your hair is really dry. Just melt it down, apply it to the hair, and be sure to focus on the ends and your scalp as well, and wash it out after some time. Over night is best, but you could get away with 3 or even 1 hour.

  • I just made this with ling cod and it was awesome! I added some asparagus with garlic and some brown rice to fill it out a bit. Thanks for the great, easy-to-follow recipe. This is the first time I’ve felt really comfortable pan-frying fish this way!

  • I have a question Beth! When my grandma or my mom or even my aunt makes homemade French fries, they put the oil on high to cook them faster and to make them crisper, but now I’m scared about the oil being toxic!!! What should I do!?!

  • Looks good Beth! Question: which coconut oil is the best to cook with? Refine/unrefined or organic? In advance, Many Many Thanks!

  • I’d love if anyone in the comments knows about the smoke point of olive oil and why it can be toxic past it’s point. Please comment back! That’s really interesting…Thanks!

  • Hi Beth,
    I want to ask about the coconut oil, have you used it on other recipes? Does it flavour the food? I have a jar of it, but always been nervous about it.
    Thanks.

  • I know you shop at Trader Joes as well Beth, they have the spray bottle for coconut oil that I regularly use. Makes cooking much easier, and you don’t have to keep opening and closing the jar! Check out the oil section:)