4 Creative Methods to Eat Seaweed From Seasoning to Dessert

 

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Healthy & Delicious Seaweed Snack in Just 5 Minutes! (Recipe)

Video taken from the channel: Yin & Yang Living


 

How to make Roasted Seaweed Snack | 김구이

Video taken from the channel: Future Neighbor


 

Seaweed Wraps Recipe

Video taken from the channel: Lennis Perez TV


 

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Video taken from the channel: Tasty


 

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Video taken from the channel: TabiEats


 

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Video taken from the channel: Great Big Story


 

Healthy & Delicious Seaweed Snack in Just 5 Minutes! (Recipe)

Video taken from the channel: Yin & Yang Living


As in, you don’t have to eat sushi seven days a week to work seaweed into your diet — far from it. Here are 11 recipes that might make you see the sea vegetable in a different, easy-to-eat light so that when seaweed reaches celeb status, you can tell all your friends, “Yeah, I liked seaweed. 2. In Salad: Seaweed is a great substitute for spinach or lettuce. Try whole leaves of purple dulse as a base and toss it with crisp apples and red cabbage, or mix wild nori, toasted with tofu.

Crumble a few sheets of dried seaweed and toss with popcorn. Sprinkle in sea salt or other seasonings you like. Nutritional yeast makes a satisfying addition as well, and provides some protein and vitamin B12. This works with bagged popcorn, but you can also make it fresh by placing 2 tablespoons to 1/4.

3 tablespoons wakame flaked, soaked in 2 cups hot water; 1/4 cup mirin (a type of sweetened rice wine) ½ teaspoon sea salt; 1 cucumber, thinly sliced. 4. Add a dash of seaweed flakes to every meal. Health food stores or Asian markets will have a variety of packaged salts and seasoning that include seaweed. Or you can make your own by combining fine-chopped or ground nori, kombu, dulse, sea salt, black pepper, and sesame seeds. 4. Create balance Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s roast carrots with butter, cumin and orange.

This recipe works well with an addition of seaweed alchemy: there is already a sweetness in the dish, and a squeeze of citrus balances the saltiness of the seaweed. As a final flourish, swap salt and pepper for a more sophisticated touch with Furikake. 7 creative ways to eat kelp.

Season with seaweed. A sprinkling of kelp seasoning can take your dishes to the next level. An easy way to start eating kelp is by buying convenient kelp powder.

Add the seaweed to a pot of dashi and warm over medium heat, stirring as it cooks. When it thickens, after about five minutes, add soy sauce, rice vinegar, mirin, and sake. Heat until most of the liquid is absorbed. Serve over rice topped with sesame seeds.

Seaweed smoothie. There is an infinite number of ways to make a smoothie. For thousands of years, oceanic communities—mostly in Asia—have harvested and eaten a variety of seaweeds.

They’re an excellent source of iodine, vital for thyroid function, but too much iodine (more than 1000 micrograms per day) can actually cause thyroid disorders (Japan has one of the highest rates of hypothyroidism). “Seaweed, a sea algae, is high in minerals and vitamins including iodine, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, vitamin B2, and vitamin C,” says Lisa Dreher, a registered dietician with the UltraWellness Center in Lenox, Massachusetts.“It’s also one of the few food sources of.

List of related literature:

Cooks there use dried shrimp as is, either whole or ground, to season various dishes; they steam and shred dried scallops before adding them to soups; they reconstitute tough abalone, octopus, squid, jellyfish, and sea cucumber by soaking in water, then simmer them until tender.

“On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen” by Harold McGee
from On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen
by Harold McGee
Scribner, 2007

Second, mix them with chopped hot red pepper, garlic, dropwort, leaf mustards, and some seaweed.

“Fermented Foods and Beverages of the World” by Jyoti Prakash Tamang, Kasipathy Kailasapathy
from Fermented Foods and Beverages of the World
by Jyoti Prakash Tamang, Kasipathy Kailasapathy
CRC Press, 2010

You can sprinkle kelp or dulse flakes on food, add dried kombu to soups and stews, add a side of seaweed salad when eating sushi out, and use sheets of nori as an alternative to bread or grainbased wraps.

“Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life” by Ben Greenfield
from Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life
by Ben Greenfield
Victory Belt Publishing, 2017

A scoop of almond butter or tahini sprinkled with a little sea salt might be perfect for you, or perhaps some almonds with soft dulse seaweed will feel like dessert.

“Loving Yourself to Great Health” by Louise Hay, Ahlea Khadro, Heather Dane
from Loving Yourself to Great Health
by Louise Hay, Ahlea Khadro, Heather Dane
Hay House, 2014

It was relatively easy to get people to try adding a little crumbled dried seaweed to a dish; dried seaweed looks much like dried herbs.

“Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us” by Ruth Kassinger
from Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us
by Ruth Kassinger
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2019

To maintain healthy cholesterol levels, a simple recipe can be made by combining 1 tsp. each of finely shredded fresh ginger, raw (shredded or finely chopped) garlic, and a little lime juice with a pinch of sea salt.

“Ayurvedic Herbology East & West: The Practical Guide to Ayurvedic Herbal Medicine” by Vasant Lad, Vishnu Dass
from Ayurvedic Herbology East & West: The Practical Guide to Ayurvedic Herbal Medicine
by Vasant Lad, Vishnu Dass
Lotus Press, 2013

When foods are flavored, it is with kinome leaves, sansho berries of the prickly ash, wasabi (a green horseradish paste), dashi (an allpurpose stock), konbu (made of kelp), and bonito in the form of flakes of this tuna.

“Asian Foods: Science and Technology” by Catharina Y.W. Ang, Keshun Liu, Yao-Wen Huang
from Asian Foods: Science and Technology
by Catharina Y.W. Ang, Keshun Liu, Yao-Wen Huang
Taylor & Francis, 1999

Place the seaweed in a pan with the lemon rind and cover with milk.

“The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands & Islands” by Rob Humphreys, Donald Reid
from The Rough Guide to Scottish Highlands & Islands
by Rob Humphreys, Donald Reid
Rough Guides, 2004

To prepare the meal, the fish is covered in a thick coconut sauce seasoned with fish sauce, palm sugar, eggs and a curry paste known as kroeung, made up of fresh chilli, galangal, turmeric, kaffir lime, garlic and lemongrass.

“Lonely Planet's Ultimate Eats” by Lonely Planet Food
from Lonely Planet’s Ultimate Eats
by Lonely Planet Food
Lonely Planet Global Limited, 2018

Some of the mildest and best-liked seaweeds include nori (used in sushi), arame, kombu (kelp), hijiki (flaked kelp), and dulse.

“The Vegetarian Planet: 350 Big-Flavor Recipes for Out-Of-This-World Food Every Day” by Didi Emmons
from The Vegetarian Planet: 350 Big-Flavor Recipes for Out-Of-This-World Food Every Day
by Didi Emmons
Harvard Common Press, 1997

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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109 comments

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  • hello Yin just asking if i’m out Kayaking and i pick some of the sea weed out in the ocean can i eat it or do i have too dry it out like to know thanks again take care hope too here back from… Alaska

  • I ate this at the japanese restaurent we went to. Its like an a snack before they served our meal and as someone who ate it just by itself without seasoning or whatever i didnt really liked it. I gave it another chance and it was soo good! I saw that there’s salt and oil in it and i was right soo thankful for this! Im gonna make it. Thank you ����

  • So I brushed oil on one side, added rice vinegar and a little more salt then you used, it was very good, they instantly became crispy like a chip and tasted very similar to a normal salt and vinegar chip with the exception of some having small hints of the actually seaweed/earthy like taste. Would recommend!

  • I enjoyed watching this! I subscribed too. I also did a seaweed snack video on my channel. Come and check it out, I’d really appreciate it:)

  • Am I the only one who can’t get this cuz there’s nothing like this in the stores here and I can’t order online because that would tanke to long time cuz I live in SWEDEN!?

  • Hello Moon! Can I please ask, how and how long could I store this if I want to make seaweed snack for one week?? Thank you!:) 

  • It’s funny when people see red beans and don’t think of a dessert, perhaps they haven’t tried them before but red beans are sweet! Of course they still have that mushy texture of beans, but honestly whenever I have a dessert with red bean paste I forget it’s a bean lol

  • My mom’s family is Swedish, and I grew up with spritz and peparkarkar at Christmas. Spritz are a melt-in-your-mouth cookie that’s basically sugar, butter, flour, and nothing else. They’re best made with almond extract rather than vanilla. Peparkarkar are a cut-out Swedish ginger snap. The tradition with those is that you break the cookie with your knuckle, and if it comes into 3 pieces, your wish will come true.
    One more that’s a breakfast dish is fleskpankarkar, which translates to “meat pancake”. It’s kind of like German apple pancake or Yorkshire pudding, but bacon. And my family serves it with maple syrup and butter. Delish!

  • Try googling Sviske-Kompott. It’s an old Norwegian dish made from prunes, and is served with milk (the fattier the better) and sugar, it’s sadly falling out of favour and is now seen as an “old people dish”, but it’s easy to make and I fell in love with it while working at a kitchen that cooked for the elderly, made enough for over 300 people every day, and I still make it at home. It’s sweet, fruity from the prunes, and gives you that good feeling of visiting your grandma, even as an adult.:D

  • Indonesians desserts:
    • klepon this chewy balls ( like mochi) filled with brown sugar then coated with coconut and a little sprinkle of sugar
    • lapis legit: cake with many layers that tastes like cinnamon and filled with raisins / almonds
    • lapis surabaya: 3 Layered sponge ( choco vanilla ) cake with jam and tastes like heaven
    • cendol: a drink w a scoop of ice/ice cream,grass jellys, many more and topped of with liquid brown sugar

  • Don’t you people do any research. What is the connection between ‘Kajar halwa’ and Indian culture. Kajar(Carrot) itself is not Indian. For people from my state(Tamil Nadu) Carrot is a foreign vegetable. Moreover there is no Indian culture, there are 29+ unique cultures. And there so many authentic desserts. When you get another opportunity for a content like this do some research.

  • Nyelo!! For El Salvador, we have a bunch of different pan dulces but my favorite is quesadilla (pretty different from Mexican quesadilla). It’s a sweet bread made with cheeses and a metric ton of sugar (depending on your sweet level). My family likes to have it with coffee for desert or for breakfast as a quick pick-me-up. It’s so good and I highly recommend everyone to go try it if they can!

  • Im from Denmark and here is some of our desserts��

    •have this thing called “æbleskiver” that translates directley to apple slices. There is no apples in anymore but there used to be. It’s a dough you pour into a special pan and the turn Them around one fourth till it’s cooked through. We eat it with jam and powdered sugar. You Can get it everywhere at christmas time.

    • We also have a thing called “koldskål” that translate to “cold bowl” it sounds really weird but we eat it all summer. It’s kinda like yougart just with a lot of sugar and these small bread things in called “kammerjunker”.

  • hello
    where do you get these seaweed wraps from?
    how are these different from fresh seaweed?
    I am interested to learn about fresh seaweed recipe. any idea what to do before cooking it?

  • I am from india and the list if sweets is gin-aormous
    1.double ka meetha 11.puran poli
    2. Suji ka halva 12. Kaju Katli
    3.meethe chawal 13.falooda
    4. Chikki 14. Mysore pak
    5.balushahi 15. Pootreku
    6.modak 16. Shahi tukde
    7. Peda 17. Sheerkhurma
    8. Laddoo 18. Lauki ka halva
    9.jalebi 19. Agra ka petha
    10.emarti 20. Khalakand
    These are a few from central south of india. There are thousands more sweets that india has got. A true paradise for sweet tooth people.

  • Finland, and the dessert is leipäjuusto in Finnish, a rough translation would be “bread cheese”but trust me, it has nothing to do with bread:)

  • Wagashi is actually very sweet, shockingly sweet for a dessert from Japan.
    Funny thing is, European desserts in Japan are less sweet…lol

  • Nanaimo Bars are my favorite local dessert chocolate and coconut base, then custard flavour buttercream in the middle and chocolate ganache on top!

  • I love the flavor but they are usually made from laver seaweed and they have a good crunch but then immediately turn to slime in your mouth! I use them in my mock tuna salad for sandwiches and salads. I buy the Sesame packages of small squares.

  • I come from South Africa, And I am probably bias but I think our food is amazing because of the amount of traditions that are intertwined into our countries culture. Some desserts that are unique to our Country are; Malva pudding, Milk Tart, peppermint Tart, “Cape Malay” koeksisters, and the Afrikaans Koeksisters. I can’t even express the amount of amazing food we have������

  • Most people in my part of Java, Indonesia don’t have a strict concept of what a dessert is. Even after centuries of European colonization, we don’t really incorporate desserts into our meals. Some of us do eat fruits after a meal as some kind of a dessert, but in Indonesian we call them “pencuci mulut”, more or less palate cleansers since our meals sometimes do have strong and bold flavors. Sure, we do have a lot of traditional and Chinese and European inspired sweets, cookies, and cakes, but we hardly ever consider them as desserts. However, they are commonly seen as snacks eaten in between meals. As I am watching this I am eating (savory) tofu fried in batter as dessert after dinner. Earlier today, I ate the same thing as an entree with my race. Yesterday, I ate yet the same thing again as a teatime snack.

  • Please do check out desserts from Kashmir, India
    They are awesome and intriguing
    They even have desserts made from mutton and chicken

  • Kanelbullar from Sweden (Swedish cinnamon buns) they are just better, they aren’t actuelly from Sweden but they an integrel part of Swedish culture.

  • Greetings from Slovenia! Here we make a delicious treat called Prekmurska gibanica. The exact translation is “over Mura moving cake” there is a few more desserts but this one is the most unique i think

  • I’m half Filipino and we eat this thing called ube, or purple yam. It’s actually very sweet. You can make stuff like ube halaya (it’s like pudding) or ube cake made with the halaya. But my favorite is ube ice cream.

  • Greetings from Slovenia! Here we make a delicious treat called Prekmurska gibanica. The exact translation is “over Mura moving cake” there is a few more desserts but this one is the most unique i think

  • In the Philippines ����, we have many glutinous rice desserts in different shapes and forms, you just have to pick which one you’re craving a specific day��

  • Here in Chile we have Picarones, these are made with cooked and swetened pumpkin, a mix of flour, egg and butter, then you make rings with the dough as Donuts and deep fry them! They go along a “soup” of chancaca (its like panela), cornstarch, clove, cinnamon and orange peel and its served warm with the Picarones in it! It’s a tradicional dessert for winter since its served warm��

  • I live in America but my parents are from the Philippines I i hope we can all agree that bibinka is the best desert in the world ;-;

  • I am “half Chilean” and I a very good dessert from there (and other countries in South America) is the Alfajor. Some are made in factories, but many people also make them home made. They are very good and have chocolate and dulce de leche in them, which is also a pretty yummy on its own.

  • -Love that we got something Welsh and that the lady spoke Welsh throughout, because we don’t see that much representation (I’m from Asia, nothing to do with Wales)
    -I’d eat Chicken pudding just because it was made with so much love, haven’t seen anyone put that much into anything
    -Halwa is the word for sweet in Arabic, makes me wonder about its origin in india

  • I’m Samoan. Puligi is a spice cake (steamed) served with a custard sauce. I keep seeing references online that it’s only served during the holidays that has not been my experience with it, it was always served on Sundays and special occasions.

  • In Bulgaria we have a dessert similar to strudel but made in a special way with pumpkin. Also in turkey there is a similar dessert like in lebanonkünefe(it’s made with kadaif, cheese, honey and pistachio.

  • I made the popcorn for me and my sister and it was good! But later my mom and dad said, ” Whats that garbage smell. Is that the trash can? “My mom smelt the popcorn and said, That popcorn stinks!” Then later my sister was with my mom and my mom said something like, “Your breath stinks! Go brush your teeth.” My mom told me not to make the bbq seasoning anymore. They said it smelt like garbage…… So If you don’t want your breath to stink DO NOT MAKE IT!

  • Brazil has the Quindim, the Queijadinha, the condensed milk party candies like Brigadeiro, Beijinho, Cajuzinho and Freeze-dried Milk Brigadeiro, the powdery peanut sweets Pé de Moleque (both on smooth, chunky and hard versions), Paçoca and Pé de Moça, the pure and not even a bit refined sugar cane extract cubes called Rapadura, the local fruits preparations like the guava’s Goiabada and Romeo and Juliet (Goiabada with cheese, typicaly white cheese from Minas Gerais state), the pumpkin’s Doce de Abóbora (I hate it) and the Bananada (from… bananas, yeah). Atop of that we still have Sweet Rice, a rich Doce de Leite culture, and for the last 20 years or so we have the modern, and heavily popular in Brazil’s south and southwest, Açaí Smoothie sweetened with Guaraná Syrup.

    We also have our favorite contributions to the cake culture, like the Carrot Cake (which is heavily sweeter than other places’ carrot cake), the Brigadeiro Cake, the Formigueiro Cake (Ants’ Nest Cake, a white milk cake with some chocolate dropplets inside), the Fubá Cake (fine corn flour cake) both in regular and creamy versions, both with and without cheese or Requeijão (brazilian cream cheese, way more creamy than u.s. cream cheese), not to mention the meringue-covered cakes (specially hand made, with all sorts of crazy spring-like egg whisking devices or just forks our most elderly people would have in their kitchens; for chantilly was not commonly avaible in our grandparents’ time, and meringue looks really shiny and smooth).

    People most oftenly would go haywire in trying to get foreingners to try Brigadeiro, but I’m 100% more on the peanut Paçoca side of the force.

    There is also this tendency of chefs trying to get Romeo and Juliet flavored fancy stuff… It most oftenly never work.

  • lammingtons Australia.

    Lord and Lady Lammington had their french chef make a yellow cake square dipped in chocolate and coated in dessicated coconut. very tasty xD

  • Hi, my family is from Cyprus ���� the best desserts (in my opinion) are Palouze and Shoushouko, which are made from a grapes.

    (Note: They are from Cyprus not Greece)

  • Sugar got “popular” because of Slavery and the development of capitalism. The sugar plantations were so brutal that the enslaved people who worked on the plantations weren’t expected to live longer than 7-9 years on the plantation

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  • for most people it is just a random teenagers spouting nonsense but for me it is a place to study nutrition for community.: ) thax for the video

  • If I was on this, I’d be like EWWWW
    If I will be on this, I’d be like YUMMM

    Edit: If you don’t get it… The first time I tried seaweed, I didn’t like it, but now I can’t get enough of it.

  • Is Poke meat always raw? If you use chicken in Poke, will it be raw too? If I order a Poke dish, can I have the restaurant cook the meat?

  • I love how simple and clean they keep these recipes. So much modern poke piles on the ingredient to the point you can barely taste the fish. Big fan!!

  • So poke is like ceviche? All looked good! I’d eat the tuna ones, I LOVE tuna. My dad and I cook something similar to the tofu poke all the time hah….love it for noodles!

  • this is the first video I’ve seen from you guys but I feel like you guys would be really great friends with anyone, you guys are so cool.

  • Falto de burrito poke…
    Cochinita pibil poke…
    Tamal poke…
    Chimichanga poke…
    Cabrito poke…
    Chile relleno poke…
    Cortadillo poke…
    Tacos poke…
    Y voladores de Papantla poke…

  • I saw this video months ago and couldn’t get it out of my head! I finally went to Japan town and bought all the ingredients to make several of these. I’m SO excited to make this right after my exams tomorrow ��

  • Nice! I’ll have to test it. As olive oil is very common in European cuisine, and the one most likely to be found in a kitchen there, do you think it could work with it, instead of sesame oil?

  • does hawaiian salt different from sea salt and kosher salt? Poke without raw fish? all my life i watched food video about poke and they were always raw fish. i mean, it is eye opening! what is poke anyway? i am not sure anymore..

  • Love roasted seaweed. Appreciate you added storage info. To add other flavors such as wasabi or ginger do you add minced or powder versions to the oil?

  • When adding your ingredients order can make a difference. For example, when making spicy ahi poke, add salt and mix the shirancha in first, let sit for a minute, then add the ikura, then mayo and green onion last. You will notice the spicy kick will be different.

  • OK guys vegetables are not a thing? My favorite place makes a vegan poke bowl and now I’m hooked looking for more vegetable ideas for poke bowls. Thanks for all of these, definitely gave me some ideas. I’m most unfamiliar with the sauces and I’m going right down to my local Asian store to look. Don’t forget avocado they must go on top!

  • Hello Moon! Can I please ask, how and how long could I store this if I want to make seaweed snack for one week?? Thank you!:) 

  • Omg! It’s after 1:00 in the morning and I want to have a poke bowl! Now I can’t sleep lol! Thank you for those awesome recipes! ������

  • Wow, so many different ideas! I made your original poke recipe for a family Xmas party, and it was such a big hit. Your recipes are always spot on. I want to try all the variations in this video, but I’ll probably try the one with the tobiko first. Thanks for the recipes and have a wonderful week!

  • You’re so creative guys! I love all of them! Thanks for your hard work! I only knew the basic ones and now I have even an italian version to try. You’re the best! Love you guys <3

  • Love this vid. I had a tofu poke bowl a little while ago and I thought it was amazing. I added avacado to mine over rice. Yum������

  • Your Mom’s favorite the tuna poke I think I might try. The veggie ones I know I would eat. That is a lot of poke to eat. I think you both had a great lunch. Thanks Brothers.

  • Cool Ranch
    Dry ranch dressing mix 2tbsp
    Paprica 1 tsp
    Garlic powder 1/2 tsp
    Onion powder /2 tsp
    salt 1 tsp
    Olive Oil 2 tbsp
    Coconut Oil 2tbsp
    Yellow popcorn kernels 1/3 cups

    Honey mustard
    Onion powder 1 tsp
    Yellow mustard 2tbsp
    White vinegar 1 tsp
    Honey 2 tsp

    BBQ
    Smoked Paprika 2 tsp
    Chili powder 1/2 tsp
    Garlic powder 1 tsp
    Onion powder 1 tsp
    Salt
    Brow sugar 2 tbsp
    Olive Oil 3 tbsp

    Buffalo
    Paprika 1 tsp
    Cayenne pepper 1/4 tsp
    Salt 1 tsp
    Sugar 1 tbsp
    Hot Sauce 2 tbsp
    Olive Oil 2 tbsp.

  • So followed the second recipe in the video to a tee and my popcorn came out soggy and too vinegary. Why was this a flavor option in the first place?

  • I’m from Bahrain, Bahraini Halwa is our national desert, but I prefer the flour-based version of it, It’s fluffy and rich, totally recommended

  • If anyone is wondering whether all these dressings will make the popcorn soggy they won’t cause they either used fat based dressing or liquids like oil or mustard or they use dense liquids like honey
    Hope y’all have a good day:)

  • I have braces so I have to be carful when I eat popcorn instead of just chomping down on it but when I get my braces of then I’m definitely trying this

  • y’all be all fancy and stuff with the popcorn seasoning, I just season it with this cheap french fry seasoning in my local minimarket.

  • Well tonight I was wanting some cheddar popcorn but didn’t have any so I looked up homemade popcorn and I found this and tried the buffalo one, I cut the recipe in half and added 1/8th of pepper. It’s okay but I can see where people may like it. I’d recommend not adding sugar because it still reflects in the popcorn and I can’t say I like it. Another comment down below said to crisp the popcorn in the oven I didn’t try it but I think it’d be great. Regardless these are just my opinions but do try one and see if you like it. Add a twist if you want. Thanks for the video tasty, they do seem good. Not trying to hate but It personally wasn’t my favorite. Like the video and subscribe!

  • I did not know nori had glue what’s it called? This like my second time I saw a roll being made the first they never showed the glue��

  • There r lot many wonderful desserts in India. Much better than Ghajar ka Halwa. May be u should try an episode on Indian sweets.Food in kerala the southern part of India is too gud

  • Thank you for making this video. The individual small packets of flavoured laver can be pricey with only a few slices which will disappear in less than a minute!! Now i can make them for my kids and we can eat as much as we want… at a more economical cost ������. Thank you again for making this useful video!

  • Thank you for sharing this! I agree that the seasoned and roasted ones are expensive. I just bought 100pcs unseasoned laver and i will do what you did here hehehe. Thank you!

  • Hiii i have a question i have a stock of bag of nori here and the color of the seems like it faded. Something like a bit brown and green. Is it still advicable to eat?

  • So I brushed oil on one side, added rice vinegar and a little more salt then you used, it was very good, they instantly became crispy like a chip and tasted very similar to a normal salt and vinegar chip with the exception of some having small hints of the actually seaweed/earthy like taste. Would recommend!

  • Can you re-roast nori and make these snacks? I live in Iowa so I have to buy raw on-line, but I can buy lightly roasted at Wal-Mart!

  • Thanks for the insight on the nori(idk what’s the term for seaweed strips in korean) chips but quick question, can I use any type of pan in order to cook it, and should it be on medium heat? I’m trying to eat a bit healthier -_-

  • Wow thank you so much! You’re straight to the point unlike that Mommytang who took 33mins just to make that snack. She loves hearing herself uck.

  • I love the flavor but they are usually made from laver seaweed and they have a good crunch but then immediately turn to slime in your mouth! I use them in my mock tuna salad for sandwiches and salads. I buy the Sesame packages of small squares.

  • I’ve tried another “California roll” poke that uses the spicy mayo sauce, along with imitation crab and avocados. It’s amaze! But, I absolutely LOVE tofu poké. It’s refreshing and not too heavy.

  • Have been binge watching your videos.. Korean foods look so damn tasty and easier than my native food which needs quite a lot of prepping. I would like to try Korean cuisine but I have no Korean mart nearby. �� But love your videos and energy and love for food. Great videos ��

  • great now i know what i want to do with the left over seaweed i have that has been sitting in the fridge!! but does it stay crunchy if u keep it in the freezer though??

  • Thanks again for another thing I would have never thought about making, you’re awesome. One question though, do you reheat the ones you put in the freezer?

  • If you’re in the United States, in a big city, and lazy see if you have an H-Mart nearby. They sell these in big bulk packages for like 5 dollars for 12 or so packages.

    Thanks for the recipe as always!

  • Watching this video at 2 AM is a mistake lol! I love how colorful each one of them. They must taste delicious. I’ve never tried poke before though, do you use regular rice or sushi rice?

  • hello Yin just asking if i’m out Kayaking and i pick some of the sea weed out in the ocean can i eat it or do i have too dry it out like to know thanks again take care hope too here back from… Alaska

  • I ate this at the japanese restaurent we went to. Its like an a snack before they served our meal and as someone who ate it just by itself without seasoning or whatever i didnt really liked it. I gave it another chance and it was soo good! I saw that there’s salt and oil in it and i was right soo thankful for this! Im gonna make it. Thank you ����

  • Delicious were lucky enough to live near the Atlantic ocean & collect our own seaweed. I’ve only electronic cooker but can the process be done on an open fire? Thank you for sharing your knowledge B

  • I enjoyed watching this! I subscribed too. I also did a seaweed snack video on my channel. Come and check it out, I’d really appreciate it:)

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  • It’s a good thing I ate something before watching this, haha. This was so freakin cool!!!! I have to say though, my fave one was the tofu mixture. I was drooling! I also enjoyed seeing all the veggie ones. So yummy! I really enjoyed this video. Who knew there was such a variety of poke bowls! Much love to you both! <3

  • I’m German-Filipino. Lebkuchen and Pfeffernuesse, I love them because it tastes like my childhood and Christmas combined, they’re German cinnamon cookies. Also Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest cake). For Filipino desserts, I don’t know if they consider Taho a dessert. I like Bibingka and Palitaw. I realized I’m just putting my favourite sweets so I’m sorry if this is least helpful.

  • My mom’s family is Swedish, and I grew up with spritz and peparkarkar at Christmas. Spritz are a melt-in-your-mouth cookie that’s basically sugar, butter, flour, and nothing else. They’re best made with almond extract rather than vanilla. Peparkarkar are a cut-out Swedish ginger snap. The tradition with those is that you break the cookie with your knuckle, and if it comes into 3 pieces, your wish will come true.
    One more that’s a breakfast dish is fleskpankarkar, which translates to “meat pancake”. It’s kind of like German apple pancake or Yorkshire pudding, but bacon. And my family serves it with maple syrup and butter. Delish!

  • Try googling Sviske-Kompott. It’s an old Norwegian dish made from prunes, and is served with milk (the fattier the better) and sugar, it’s sadly falling out of favour and is now seen as an “old people dish”, but it’s easy to make and I fell in love with it while working at a kitchen that cooked for the elderly, made enough for over 300 people every day, and I still make it at home. It’s sweet, fruity from the prunes, and gives you that good feeling of visiting your grandma, even as an adult.:D

  • Omg! It’s after 1:00 in the morning and I want to have a poke bowl! Now I can’t sleep lol! Thank you for those awesome recipes! ������

  • In the Philippines ����, we have many glutinous rice desserts in different shapes and forms, you just have to pick which one you’re craving a specific day��

  • Nyelo!! For El Salvador, we have a bunch of different pan dulces but my favorite is quesadilla (pretty different from Mexican quesadilla). It’s a sweet bread made with cheeses and a metric ton of sugar (depending on your sweet level). My family likes to have it with coffee for desert or for breakfast as a quick pick-me-up. It’s so good and I highly recommend everyone to go try it if they can!

  • Im from Denmark and here is some of our desserts��

    •have this thing called “æbleskiver” that translates directley to apple slices. There is no apples in anymore but there used to be. It’s a dough you pour into a special pan and the turn Them around one fourth till it’s cooked through. We eat it with jam and powdered sugar. You Can get it everywhere at christmas time.

    • We also have a thing called “koldskål” that translate to “cold bowl” it sounds really weird but we eat it all summer. It’s kinda like yougart just with a lot of sugar and these small bread things in called “kammerjunker”.

  • There r lot many wonderful desserts in India. Much better than Ghajar ka Halwa. May be u should try an episode on Indian sweets.Food in kerala the southern part of India is too gud

  • I am from india and the list if sweets is gin-aormous
    1.double ka meetha 11.puran poli
    2. Suji ka halva 12. Kaju Katli
    3.meethe chawal 13.falooda
    4. Chikki 14. Mysore pak
    5.balushahi 15. Pootreku
    6.modak 16. Shahi tukde
    7. Peda 17. Sheerkhurma
    8. Laddoo 18. Lauki ka halva
    9.jalebi 19. Agra ka petha
    10.emarti 20. Khalakand
    These are a few from central south of india. There are thousands more sweets that india has got. A true paradise for sweet tooth people.

  • Finland, and the dessert is leipäjuusto in Finnish, a rough translation would be “bread cheese”but trust me, it has nothing to do with bread:)

  • Wagashi is actually very sweet, shockingly sweet for a dessert from Japan.
    Funny thing is, European desserts in Japan are less sweet…lol

  • Nanaimo Bars are my favorite local dessert chocolate and coconut base, then custard flavour buttercream in the middle and chocolate ganache on top!

  • My family is from Jamaica. We eat ice cream pretty often but during the Christmas season, it is tradition to make fruitcake. Black Jamaican fruitcake is the best cake I ever had. You soak dried fruits and currants in rum for about 6 months. That’s what gives the fruitcake it’s black color. Mix in cake ingredients: flour, sugar, baking powder, etc. then you bake it. Then after it cools, you pour a small amount of rum over the top to give it a glaze. Then for Easter, the tradition is Easter bun. And you eat it as a snack with cheese. But it’s sweet enough to eat as a dessert.

  • I come from South Africa, And I am probably bias but I think our food is amazing because of the amount of traditions that are intertwined into our countries culture. Some desserts that are unique to our Country are; Malva pudding, Milk Tart, peppermint Tart, “Cape Malay” koeksisters, and the Afrikaans Koeksisters. I can’t even express the amount of amazing food we have������

  • Most people in my part of Java, Indonesia don’t have a strict concept of what a dessert is. Even after centuries of European colonization, we don’t really incorporate desserts into our meals. Some of us do eat fruits after a meal as some kind of a dessert, but in Indonesian we call them “pencuci mulut”, more or less palate cleansers since our meals sometimes do have strong and bold flavors. Sure, we do have a lot of traditional and Chinese and European inspired sweets, cookies, and cakes, but we hardly ever consider them as desserts. However, they are commonly seen as snacks eaten in between meals. As I am watching this I am eating (savory) tofu fried in batter as dessert after dinner. Earlier today, I ate the same thing as an entree with my race. Yesterday, I ate yet the same thing again as a teatime snack.

  • Please do check out desserts from Kashmir, India
    They are awesome and intriguing
    They even have desserts made from mutton and chicken

  • Kanelbullar from Sweden (Swedish cinnamon buns) they are just better, they aren’t actuelly from Sweden but they an integrel part of Swedish culture.

  • I’m German-Filipino. Lebkuchen and Pfeffernuesse, I love them because it tastes like my childhood and Christmas combined, they’re German cinnamon cookies. Also Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (Black Forest cake). For Filipino desserts, I don’t know if they consider Taho a dessert. I like Bibingka and Palitaw. I realized I’m just putting my favourite sweets so I’m sorry if this is least helpful.

  • I’m half Filipino and we eat this thing called ube, or purple yam. It’s actually very sweet. You can make stuff like ube halaya (it’s like pudding) or ube cake made with the halaya. But my favorite is ube ice cream.

  • It’s funny when people see red beans and don’t think of a dessert, perhaps they haven’t tried them before but red beans are sweet! Of course they still have that mushy texture of beans, but honestly whenever I have a dessert with red bean paste I forget it’s a bean lol

  • Don’t you people do any research. What is the connection between ‘Kajar halwa’ and Indian culture. Kajar(Carrot) itself is not Indian. For people from my state(Tamil Nadu) Carrot is a foreign vegetable. Moreover there is no Indian culture, there are 29+ unique cultures. And there so many authentic desserts. When you get another opportunity for a content like this do some research.

  • Here in Chile we have Picarones, these are made with cooked and swetened pumpkin, a mix of flour, egg and butter, then you make rings with the dough as Donuts and deep fry them! They go along a “soup” of chancaca (its like panela), cornstarch, clove, cinnamon and orange peel and its served warm with the Picarones in it! It’s a tradicional dessert for winter since its served warm��