How you can Get ready for The First 5K Part 2

 

3 Intervals to Prep You For Your First 5K

Video taken from the channel: Kelly Roberts


 

Run Community Question: 3 Tips to Prepare for your FIRST 5km

Video taken from the channel: The Run Experience


 

5k Training | 3 Surprising Tips

Video taken from the channel: The Run Experience


 

3 Training Intervals to Prep You For Your First 5K Run

Video taken from the channel: POPSUGAR Fitness


 

How to Run Your First 5K: Race Day Prep

Video taken from the channel: Fabletics


 

How to Run Your First 5k!

Video taken from the channel: MarissaKai


 

Running For Beginners! First 5k, Tips, and Essentials

Video taken from the channel: Hannah Ashton


Many of you enjoyed Part 1 of “How to Prepare for Your First 5k.” Now that you have a good head start, it’s time to address some common errors that new runners make. Getting new shoes for the race. Unless your shoes are showing signs of wear (which I outline below), do.

Along with increasing your mileage, you should include cross-training, which can consist of swimming, cycling, or strength training. If running isn’t your forte, you can run-walk or walk the race. Put your name, address, cell phone number, bib number, and e-mail address clearly on your race bib, or better yet, use a RoadID, which you can wear on your wrist or shoe.

Bring extra tissue. Pre-5K Race Routine. Get to the race early. I would suggest 45 minutes to an hour before the race starts.

This will allow you to get a good parking spot, along with giving you plenty of time to use the bathroom, warm up, stretch, and mentally prepare for your first race. Factors such as what part of your foot you land on, how injury-prone you are, and how heavy you are can influence the type of shoe you need. And remember, one pair doesn’t last forever, especially if you’re logging the miles.

Replace your shoes about every 500 miles max, or when they start to feel flat or hurt your feet. Build Your Base When first starting a 5K-training program, you should be able to walk at a brisk pace — 15 minutes per mile — for 30 minutes. If you cannot, you should build your walking distance first. Once you are ready to add running to your workout, do so gradually with a. About 16 to 20 weeks before the marathon, start building the distance of this workout so you run 20 miles at leastonce before the race.

Preferably, as a first-timer marathoner, you will run 20 to 21 miles two or even three times before race day. So, you’ve run a 5K—maybe even a 10K—and now you’re ready for something more challenging like a half marathon. Good for you! The half marathon is a great distance. It’s long enough to feel challenged, but not so long that training for it completely consumes your life.Below are a few good training tips for your first half marathon.

1. Build. Walk two to three minutes to pre-warm your body. Run 10 minutes at an easy effort to warm up. Run 6 x 2 minutes at a hard but controlled effort in the red zone. Follow every two minutes of hard.

Estimate your time for finishing the ultra and build up to running those total hours over two days. You want to run the full distance (combining back-to-back days) at least three or four times before the race. For example, if you think you will finish in six hour.

List of related literature:

Practice your drinking technique in training as much as possible—trying to mimic race conditions—and follow the pre-hydration guidelines from Chapter 5, starting 36 to 48 hours before the race.

“Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.” by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
from Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.
by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
VeloPress, 2012

In chapter 6, you’ll learn how—and why—to reduce your mileage as the marathon approaches and what workouts to do just before the race to reach the start line with the optimal blend of being rested and ready.

“Advanced Marathoning” by Pete Pfitzinger, Scott Douglas
from Advanced Marathoning
by Pete Pfitzinger, Scott Douglas
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2019

In chapter 5, you’ll learn how—and why—to reduce your mileage as the marathon approaches and what workouts to do just before the race to reach the start line with the optimal blend of being rested and ready.

“Advanced Marathoning” by Pete Pfitzinger, Scott Douglas
from Advanced Marathoning
by Pete Pfitzinger, Scott Douglas
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2008

Finally, in chapter 12, will presentaselection of training plansfor each of four race distances:5K, 10K, half-marathon, and marathon.These plans will help you get started with the adaptive approach to training and the process of becoming an effective self-coach.

“Run Faster from the 5K to the Marathon: How to Be Your Own Best Coach” by Brad Hudson, Matt Fitzgerald
from Run Faster from the 5K to the Marathon: How to Be Your Own Best Coach
by Brad Hudson, Matt Fitzgerald
Crown, 2008

Know that the plan is designed to help you push through the discomfort on race day with the knowledge that you have completed hard runs before.

“Run to the Finish: The Everyday Runner's Guide to Avoiding Injury, Ignoring the Clock, and Loving the Run” by Amanda Brooks
from Run to the Finish: The Everyday Runner’s Guide to Avoiding Injury, Ignoring the Clock, and Loving the Run
by Amanda Brooks
Hachette Books, 2020

For runners in this situation, consider choosing a new race or at least revising time goals.

“Hansons Marathon Method: Run Your Fastest Marathon the Hansons Way” by Luke Humphrey, Keith and Kevin Hanson
from Hansons Marathon Method: Run Your Fastest Marathon the Hansons Way
by Luke Humphrey, Keith and Kevin Hanson
VeloPress, 2016

For the newbie, you can use this program to prepare for everything from a 5K to a half marathon.

“The Cool Impossible: The coach from Born to Run shows how to get the most from your miles and from yourself” by Eric Orton, Rich O'Brien
from The Cool Impossible: The coach from Born to Run shows how to get the most from your miles and from yourself
by Eric Orton, Rich O’Brien
Simon & Schuster UK, 2013

If the goal is to run a marathon and the client has never run even 5 miles (8 km), the first goal might be to develop the habit of training four times per week; the second might be to run 2 miles (3.2 km); and the third might be to run in a 10K (6.2-mile) race.

“NSCA's Essentials of Personal Training” by NSCA -National Strength & Conditioning Association
from NSCA’s Essentials of Personal Training
by NSCA -National Strength & Conditioning Association
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2011

When I signed up for the race, I had more than six months to prepare, so I found a plan that outlined checkpoints and gave me mini goals for my training.

“She's Still There: Rescuing the Girl in You” by Chrystal Evans Hurst, Priscilla Shirer
from She’s Still There: Rescuing the Girl in You
by Chrystal Evans Hurst, Priscilla Shirer
Zondervan, 2017

There are not a lot of training tips in this book, because in general I am skeptical that training advice is useful for most runners.

“The Incomplete Book of Running” by Peter Sagal
from The Incomplete Book of Running
by Peter Sagal
Simon & Schuster, 2019

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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11 comments

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  • Does it start out where a lot of people can’t reach 1 miles and then after doing it everyday you get longer distances? I can only jog like.85 miles without stopping, but I’ve been walking at least 5 miles everyday, does just running everyday allow you to get further and further like everything else, I need motivation

  • Hey I just found your video, thanks for creating and posting them for us. I’ve been running a while now but am always looking for new tips to improve my time and distance. Would you by chance have a video on proper stretching for a run, to include before AND after? Thanks.

  • I really needed this!! I am trying to get into running, too, for my school’s cross country team. Please do more videos on running!! (I loved it!)

  • Am stuck around 20:20 for 5Ks despite tough speed work once a week and long runs of up to 8, usually with some 7:40 miles in second half; running 5 to 6 days a week; getting 5 1/2 to 6 hours sleep; and very busy daily schedule with late evening work. Any suggestions?

  • Just signed up for my first 5k. I’m not a runner. Ha! Not even a jogger and I have no clue, But I found a pair of running shoes in my closet that I’ve never worn (my husband bought them for me cause I said they’re cute 3 years ago) an app ( couch to 5k ) and this video!! Now I just need to do the work. Race is Aug 25th ��

  • I just ran my first 5k (Humana 5k) on 06-15-19 and got first place in my age group (20-39), second place for female overall and fourteenth place in the race as a whole! I work at Humana, signed up because my coworker made the T-shirts for the 5k; I certainly wasn’t expecting to do so well! The thing is, before that day, I never ran or jogged; I just power-walk every single day. Be it on breaks at work or just walking around my family’s kitchen table, I must have been working my heart up enough and didn’t even realize my potential! I can’t wait to sign up for another one!

  • A girl that cute better be able to run fast-she’s running in a bad neighborhood over the First Street Bridge in L.A! She looks great.

  • I’ve been looking for a video like this! Really wanting to start getting back into running and your video is giving me all this inspo! ����‍♀️

  • looking straight ahead when running up hill, I have issues doing this as I wear prescription glasses and loose the step/ terrain that my feet are landing on.

    when running a 5 km I break it up by turning round whilst still moving in the same direction and run backwards for about 10 to 15 meters

  • stretching really is so important! if you don’t stretch injuries are more likely to occur and you won’t be in as good shape as possible.

  • Hi, I’m beginner and planning to go for a 5K run. All I can do at the moment is a non-stop run of 3K in 20 minutes.I breath heavily and could not run further.Does these squats for every mile will help me? Do you suggest any other strategy to be adopted?
    Thanks,
    Jerome