The Art Work of Knowing When you should Push Ahead or Back Away

 

The Art of Woodworking Episode 4: Dovetail

Video taken from the channel: Beverly Community Access Media


 

Laurin McCracken FB LIVE.mp4

Video taken from the channel: Streamline Art Video


 

Fine Art Hour with Elizabeth Robbins

Video taken from the channel: Sentient Academy


 

START to FINISH Fine Art Portrait Retouch

Video taken from the channel: Ferhan Khan Photography


 

FINE ART PORTRAITURE | How to Light PART 1

Video taken from the channel: The Photographer Academy


 

FINE ART PORTRAITURE | How to Light PART 4

Video taken from the channel: The Photographer Academy


 

Ken Auster “Mastering Street Scenes” **FREE LESSON VIEWING**

Video taken from the channel: Streamline Art Video


The Fine Art of Knowing When to Push Ahead or Back Off. by Daina Lynn. October 1, 2018. 4 Comments.

This concept, and article as a whole, has remnants of The Fine Art of Quitting While You’re Ahead. In it, I say, “It’s in ‘just one more mile’ when we sprain our ankle.” This is a great metaphor for practicing balance during your. I find it beneficial to have my “person”—that one friend I know I can reach out to when I need advice or simply just need to get something off my chest. Sometimes all I need is a quick venting session—10 minutes to spill everything that’s bothering me, and my person simply listens and doesn’t give any advice unless I ask for it.

The fine art of timing is in knowing what to say and when. You have a sensitive ear this week, so use it to discern messaging from colleagues, family members, lovers, and friends. The Fine Art of Asking the Right Questions Part 2: Cultivating the curiosity and wonder of a child’s mind.

Posted Nov 14, 2019. In closing, artists will often find themselves in the position of facing struggles head-on. Art and struggle walk hand-in-hand. Veterans of the art world can no doubt tell you about some of the ‘brick walls’ they have smacked over the decades.

That said, most of you WILL keep pushing forward just as they did. Make an agreement with yourself that you’re going to do it anyway and that you will make a decent effort, not fool yourself with a feeble attempt. You know in your heart that it’s only by practicing that you can get back into your art. Acknowledge your desire to.

Creating art that we know we can do well, or that will be well-received. Allow yourself a day, an evening, a weekend or even a week where you indulge the desire to experiment. None of the work needs to be marketable, none of it needs to ever be seen again, you will not have to. It’s easy to get wrapped up in social media praise and the rush of a lot of “likes” on a piece you have posted online. But, successful artists know that their growth comes from within and not from external praise.

Give up on the myth of the scattered, genius artist. Successful artists know that they have to be organized to get ahead. I think the opposite is often true for #1. Completely cutting oneself off from the the work of others can help create art that is more representative of oneself. My pottery teacher and I were talking about finding your own style, something which I often feel distressed.

Appendix: Calculating the Forward Tilt in a Frame Hanging on a Wall. I provide a full derivation of the problem here.If you would rather not delve into that, please refer to the diagram above. We want to find the gap g between the frame and the wall, given the known variables F, B, C, D and W.To get there, we first need to find an expression for y = (y1 + y2 + y3), then use calculus to find.

List of related literature:

But if you enter the tunnel in a bad position, you have only two options: continue moving in a compromised way or restart the movement in a good position.

“Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance” by Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza
from Becoming a Supple Leopard 2nd Edition: The Ultimate Guide to Resolving Pain, Preventing Injury, and Optimizing Athletic Performance
by Kelly Starrett, Glen Cordoza
Victory Belt Publishing, 2015

Or take a jump, either back to an earlier path you skipped by too quickly or forward to a completely new approach.

“The Art Of Innovation: Lessons in Creativity from IDEO, America's Leading Design Firm” by Tom Kelley
from The Art Of Innovation: Lessons in Creativity from IDEO, America’s Leading Design Firm
by Tom Kelley
Profile, 2016

So, when you get to the door, you use intuition to make the trivial decision about whether to push or to pull.

“Social Psychology” by Thomas Heinzen, Wind Goodfriend
from Social Psychology
by Thomas Heinzen, Wind Goodfriend
SAGE Publications, 2017

But you’ll find you can reach your outcome more effectively by gently aligning and then leading rather than by pushing violently.

“Unlimited Power: The New Science Of Personal Achievement” by Tony Robbins
from Unlimited Power: The New Science Of Personal Achievement
by Tony Robbins
Free Press, 2008

In winter climbing, this same approach can work really well when you’re unsure or have a doubt in the placement.

“1001 Climbing Tips: The essential climbers' guide: from rock, ice and big-wall climbing to diet, training and mountain survival” by Andy Kirkpatrick
from 1001 Climbing Tips: The essential climbers’ guide: from rock, ice and big-wall climbing to diet, training and mountain survival
by Andy Kirkpatrick
Vertebrate Publishing, 2016

When confronted with the unexpected—and with enough wiggle room to not panic— you have the option to either quickly backtrack and make up for lost time, or run with it a bit.

“The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture” by Scott Belsky
from The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture
by Scott Belsky
Penguin Publishing Group, 2018

Moving forward requires not looking over your shoulder, other than to learn from mistakes.

“Elevate: Push Beyond Your Limits and Unlock Success in Yourself and Others” by Robert Glazer
from Elevate: Push Beyond Your Limits and Unlock Success in Yourself and Others
by Robert Glazer
Sourcebooks, 2019

Conversely, if you stop backing up, the other person will stop moving toward you.

“You're Wearing That?: Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation” by Deborah Tannen
from You’re Wearing That?: Understanding Mothers and Daughters in Conversation
by Deborah Tannen
Random House Publishing Group, 2006

Having the systems in place to handle each moment as it comes is the most positive maneuver you can make.

“The Essential Homebirth Guide: For Families Planning or Considering Birthing at Home” by Jane E. Drichta, Jodilyn Owen, Christianne Northrup
from The Essential Homebirth Guide: For Families Planning or Considering Birthing at Home
by Jane E. Drichta, Jodilyn Owen, Christianne Northrup
Gallery Books, 2013

Pushing ahead will only lead to confusion and frustration.

“Og Mandino's University of Success: The Greatest Self-Help Author in the World Presents the Ultimate Success Book” by Og Mandino
from Og Mandino’s University of Success: The Greatest Self-Help Author in the World Presents the Ultimate Success Book
by Og Mandino
Random House Publishing Group, 2011

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

View all posts

16 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • wow, that was stressful! I can’t answer to questions while I paint. Thank you both Inspired and Sentient for helping me get better. Greetings from Madrid 😉

  • Hi Phil. Yes Starrett only way to go. This vid epitomizes the detail of fine craftsmanship and why handmade furniture costs so much. So forgive my ignorance but wouldn’t fishtail chisels work best for cutting out halfblinds?

  • This is my style of photography. You gave some great tips! And the model was so cute and adorable. 9:28 was my favorite pic. I mostly prefer head and shoulder shots. I feel there’s more emotion from the subject then. But these were all good.

  • I have followed Phil Lowe for many years through Fine Woodworking.  Phil is a Master Craftsman with exceptional skills, and I’m loving The Art of Woodworking videos.  Thanks Phil for taking the time to produce these videos.  I would be an honor and privilege to have the opportunity to meet you in real life one day.  It’s been a goal on my bucket list for many years.  Thanks Phil for such exceptional instruction.

  • Is there a difference between d&b with curves and gray layer in the result? If yes when do you use curves and when gray layer? Thanks for your videos.

  • With masking fluid I always test it on a scrap of paper the same as what I’m going to paint on,masking tape has a shelf life,it goes off,i was caught once it did not come off.

  • Thanks for sharing the series, mate. I like the feather shawl. With her big eyes and braids it made me think of the character Senua from Hellblade 2. I would have plastered her in mud and woad instead of the war bonnet, but to each their own!

  • Very impressive. I am so inspired by your craftsmanship. Back to practice and more practice for me. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and extensive experience.

  • Misleading intro to this demo. Where was the information on creating the black? ‘‘In today’s broadcast, Laurin walks you through every step of his painting process from start to finish. Discover how he attains such a high level of realism and how he achieves his rich, deep black — a hallmark of his award-winning paintings. You’ll be able to apply everything Laurin teaches to any realism subject, not just glass and wood!” Nothing mentioned that you had to purchase the video to get that part.

  • Mark Cleghorn, I am loving your videos on lighting and you are such a good teacher. I wrote down some notes for myself from your recent advice on headshot lighting yesterday, which I may add to a guide booklet on post production and studio lighting I am writing, only with your permission of course, hope that’s ok? Your photos here are amazing. ��

  • Hi love your tutorials. I want to ask you what’s the name of that little stand you put the foam on at 13:13 and where can I get them. I made the same one for my studio.

  • My old boss used to call those Jorgansen clamps, hand screws! Not many other joints as pretty as dovetails.American Pioneer Carpentry& Cabinets Bklyn NY

  • I have tried to watch sev vids on this channel. Way too much TALKING!!!infact iv never got past the talking!!! I am glad you offered these online so I could see that. I would have been really unhappy if I had paid money for these. You can talk while you are painting!! But these lectures like you are in front of a class are boring and really annoying. Good luck. I gave up before the painting began

  • It always strikes me that mostly American woodworkers are so eager to show off that their dovetails are hand cut that the pins are much thinner than actually esthetic. Instead of having the pins and tails of almost equal size at the base, they choose to make the pins as thin as possible to the extent that they are almost closed at the end. This really looks terrible to the eye… and that just to demonstrate that they were not cut using the dreaded router.

  • Thank you for your time to record it, when +/week ago for the first time i saw your video using this mixer brush i started to use it on my low layer (in FS) andthis with D&B gave me this painterly look that i wanted to get… since kids dont have as much skin texture it goes fast…but yeah not all people like it i guess… I got comment thats it’s too perfect, too smooth even if i keept high layer with texture in FS…My fault i guess… i wanted to make it more then just a photo…

  • It’s a joy to watch a real craftsman at work, and when he is articulate and able to explain everything he is doing and even thinking as he works, well, it just doesn’t get any better than that! Thanks Phil.