Studies Suggest Weight Lifting Can Help You Live Longer

 

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Can Strength Training Help You Live Longer?

Video taken from the channel: Lifestyle Medicine


In addition to helping you live longer, weightlifting and exercise, in general, can greatly improve your quality of life as you get older. Weight lifting has been linked to increasing bone density, improve balance, increase stamina, and above all strengthen the muscles that weaken over time. While lifting heavier is the goal, you don’t have to have the heaviest weight on the rack in your hands.

A study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology found doing 20 to 25 reps with lighter weight was just as efficient for building strength as doing 8 to 12 reps with heavier weights. The benefit to this is you are able to lift for years without beating your body down. It’s well-know that an active lifestyle and balanced diet will help you live a healthier and longer life, but it seems that strength training, specifically, is the key to living longer.

According to a new study conducted by Penn State College of Medicine, lifting weights when aged 65. It’s well-know that an active lifestyle and balanced diet will help you live a healthier and longer life, but it seems that strength training, specifically, is the key to living longer. According to a new study conducted by Penn State College of Medicine, lifting weights when aged 65.

The secret to a longer life may be a barbell: Strength training as you age reduces your risk for death, according to a new study from Penn State College of. Studies Show: Lifting Heavy Weights Helps You Live Longer 2 of 2 Weight lifting can also reduce the risk of heart disease and other heart-related ailments. After a 45 minute workout, your blood pressure can be lowered by up to twenty percent. LINKING LIFESPAN AND LIFTING.

Several studies have found a correlation between strength training and lifespan. The latest, a 2018 study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found women with an average age of 62 who spent up to 145 minutes per week engaged in strength training activities were less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and any other cause during the 12-year study. While it can’t be disputed that there are benefits to both strength training and cardio, a new study has found that the former might help increase life expectancy. According to research by the.

New research suggests that weight training might help to increase your life expectancy. According to research by the University of Michigan, having strong muscles has a direct effect on how long. Do strength training Regular physical activity promotes general good health, reduces the risk of developing many diseases, and helps you live a longer and healthier life.

For many of us, “exercise” means walking, jogging, treadmill work, or other activities that get the heart pumping.

List of related literature:

Yet, few studies exist with long-term observations of highly motivated senior athletes involved in strength training.

“Science and Practice of Strength Training” by Vladimir M. Zatsiorsky, William J. Kraemer, Andrew C. Fry
from Science and Practice of Strength Training
by Vladimir M. Zatsiorsky, William J. Kraemer, Andrew C. Fry
Human Kinetics, 2020

Other studies also have verified the benefits of functional strength training to improve activities of daily living (ADL), including countering the devastating medical consequences of slips and falls in the older elderly.33’224’243

“Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance” by William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch
from Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance
by William D. McArdle, Frank I. Katch, Victor L. Katch
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010

Other studies have confirmed the positive effects of training on productivity.

“Chasing Stars: The Myth of Talent and the Portability of Performance” by Boris Groysberg
from Chasing Stars: The Myth of Talent and the Portability of Performance
by Boris Groysberg
Princeton University Press, 2012

Many other studies support this conclusion, demonstrating that resistance training has positive effects on both neural and skeletal muscle mechanisms, leading to strength gains.

“Exercise and Physical Activity for Older Adults” by Danielle R. Bouchard
from Exercise and Physical Activity for Older Adults
by Danielle R. Bouchard
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2020

Other studies also confirm the beneficial effects of training on one’s perception of effort (Gaskill et al. 2005).

“Fitness cycling” by Brian J. Sharkey, Steven E. Gaskill
from Fitness cycling
by Brian J. Sharkey, Steven E. Gaskill
Human Kinetics, 2013

Not surprisingly, findings suggest that exercise and nutrition improve cardiovascular health, increase bone and muscle structure, and reduce weight.

“Encyclopedia of Anthropology” by H. James Birx, Sage Publications, Thomson Gale (Firm), Sage eReference (Online service)
from Encyclopedia of Anthropology
by H. James Birx, Sage Publications, et. al.
SAGE Publications, 2006

And recent studies show that regular exercise and good fitness are associated with high function in the parts of the brain that promote learning.

“Health Opportunities Through Physical Education” by Corbin, Charles B, McConnell, Karen, Le Masurier, Guy, Corbin, David, Farrar, Terri
from Health Opportunities Through Physical Education
by Corbin, Charles B, McConnell, Karen, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2014

However, a 2004 study in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that muscle power is a better predictor of longevity than is muscle strength.

“The New Rules of Lifting: Six Basic Moves for Maximum Muscle” by Lou Schuler, Alwyn Cosgrove
from The New Rules of Lifting: Six Basic Moves for Maximum Muscle
by Lou Schuler, Alwyn Cosgrove
Penguin Publishing Group, 2005

This cause and effect relationship has been confirmed with research linking changes in aerobic fitness to changes in mortality.

“Encyclopedia of Epidemiology” by Sarah Boslaugh, Louise-Anne McNutt
from Encyclopedia of Epidemiology
by Sarah Boslaugh, Louise-Anne McNutt
SAGE Publications, 2008

A number of studies, however, have documented that exercise causes improvements in strength and power, in muscle force generation at the single-fiber level, and improvement in overall function in the elderly.

“Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book” by Randall L. Braddom
from Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book
by Randall L. Braddom
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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20 comments

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  • a brilliant, courageous and iconoclastic presentation… I always felt the annual physical was a bit antiquated and can seriously use some serious rethinking!!

  • There’s some interesting TED talks on this. I’m a 54 yo female and I train 5 days a week, strongest ever ever been. I simply fight the sarcopenia; I detest the way older people start to look frail and spindly. Then they start to lose their balance and coordination. Then a simple fall and trip is disaster because there’s no muscle protecting the joints. Then they have a long recovery, thus accelerating sarcopenia. Then, they’re my mom, who can barely manage getting back and forth to store because she’s never moved.. iM SIMPLY NOT GIVING IN TO DECAY!!!

  • I had natto the first time last week and at least I know not to eat it by itself. You have to be hardcore to do that. Most Japanese people eat it with rice with some seasoning topped with egg.

  • Being on an ill fitting cushion and poor transfers can also cause skin break down. It’s important to do yearly pressure mappings to find a cushion that works for you and to transfer properly.:)

  • Age is just a number. If you’re able to workout, do it. The human body was made to excercise, not just sit around all day and watch T.V. I go for morning walks around my neighborhood and do bodyweight excercises, free weights and excercise bands��������������

  • T-6 complete here. Thank you for your videos. They help a lot.
    I got to start doing better in a few areas. I think laziness tends to sit in every now and then.

  • Gluten free and have eczema and It doesn’t matter what I do I constantly have had sores for a decade now and can’t even get care for them anymore

  • Good job Richard �� enjoyed the video as usual! I’m a T-9 T-10 two years post & �� the same way, best method all under control zero accidents ;))
    Always very helpful and spreading a lot of well-being �� I thank you for that ☺

  • fasting is known for very long time to be effective, there is no need to torment poor animal to proof something already know. shame on cruel vivisectors

  • Hey Richard, thank you very much for this inspiring video. I’d like to ask you about your bladder management after AMS 800, how often do you pee? I am t3 incomplete, i have to pee every two to three hours which is really annoying especially when l am out. Have you heard about Mitrofanoff procedure? I wonder which one is better??

  • The banana ����������. Great video too! I was injured almost two years ago now and I’ve watched many of your vids. Even having the hard day here and there it’s helpful to watch other folks with sci on you tube. (You guys are the only people with SCI I know other than me, T10 complete.)

  • Awesome video, thanks for inspiration and insight. Just turned 50 �� and thought best days are behind me. After watching this I am going to re-start lifting weights, it actually feels good afterwards. The accomplishment and improvement is priceless.

  • I’m able bodied but still watch videos. I think it helps to get a better understanding of some things. Also from time to time I can get things as I have a hidden disability so might get a bit of what people have trouble with.
    As for bowel problems people can get them even if they don’t have spinal problems. Occasionally I have problems and have to stick my finger in certain areas to relieve myself. It’s not something people usually talk about but it is helpful to let people know they are not alone and what can be done.

  • How I managed at first was keeping a log book. Once I became more familiar and comfortable in my new routines I could leave the log book behind.

  • Thank you for the vid!!!
    Do you think it is possible to make significant gains in my 50 under the condition even if I am experienced in wheightlifting?
    Greetings from Black Forest Germany

  • Hi I watched like almost all videos, I have a urine leak but I know many people get Botox injection and have good results unfortunately we don’t have that Botox in Sri Lanka which means I will have kidney issues in the long term and now I am a little bit of depression. I have no idea what to do.

  • Thank you and nice explations..What we call as Ekadashi which occurs twice month (controls mind /body )complete fasting in Sanatan Dharma (Hinduism)…it is not fasting doing once in a year….

  • I do not have an SCI, but I spent most of last year in bed. I didn’t know how bad pressure could be… Pressure Sores go from “not a problem” to “A MASSIVE HUGE PROBLEM!!!!!!!” unbeliveably quickly if you are not doing pressure releases/changing position constantly/using an alternating air mattress.
    If you have full feeling in the area that is developing a pressure sore then you can actually feel your flesh dying from the inside out which is one of the worst feelings I’ve ever experienced D:

  • I had a artificial bladder neck fitted and had problem after problem until my eureathra split and nearly killed me and did even more damage to my lower body, I know use wheelchair or crutches, 6years ago I played football and worked with people with learning disability, my whole life was flipped upside down, you’re videos help me not feel I’m the only 1 and that I can still do things you are a great inspiration. Keep up the good work and fighting your personal fight ����✌��♿