Sceletium Tortuosum – Improve Cognitive Function Beat the Blues

 

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Sceletium tortuosum has been used for hundreds of years by South Africans to improve mood and cope with stressful situations. In fact, some accounts state that small doses of the herb mixed with a teaspoon of breast milk have been used in rural areas as a remedy for children battling cholic – interestingly enough, this practice still takes. Find out how sceletium tortuosum helps to improve your brain function, focus, clarity, and beat off the blues.

Sceletium tortuosum is a succulent plant commonly found in South Africa, which is also known as Kanna, Channa, Kougoed (Kauwgoed/ ‘kougoed’, prepared from ‘fermenting’ S. tortuosum)—which literally means, ‘chew(able) things’ or ‘something to chew’.. The generally recognised eight Sceletium species are S. crassicaule, S. emarcidum, S. exalatum, S. expansum, S. rigidum, S. strictum, S. Sceletium Tortuosum – Improve Cognitive Function & Beat the Blues Bryn Hunter 2019-06-18T14:30:40-04:00 Sceletium, potent mood booster Among the many thousands of plants used medicinally around the world, about a hundred or so are mind and mood-modifying. Sceletium tortuosum, or Kanna, is a hardy plant native to South Africa which has been used by the San people for ages to improve mood. It activates a group of alkaloids (mesembrine, mesembrenol and turtuosamine) which interact with receptors in the brain to enhance the production of dopamine and prolongs the activity of serotonin – leaving you feeling alert and happy.

Sceletium Tortuosum is a medicinal plant from South Africa. It’s also a succulent commonly known as Kanna, Channa, and Kougoed. Kanna is a herb considered by many as the king of mood support remedies. Kanna (literally meaning “something to chew”) is.

Sceletium has shocked researchers with its remarkable ability to brighten mood, dissolve tension and enhance cognitive function—all within as little as 30 minutes! [8,9] What I like most about sceletium is that it is not a stimulant. It has virtually no known side effects or interactions, and it’s not habit forming.*. Dose: 25mg and 50mg of 2:1 Sceletium extract. Conclusion: The overall results support the use of Zembrin® as a functional food with potential to improve mental health and enhance well-being with respect to cognitive function, anxiety, stress and mood.

Mucuna 10:1 extract (40% L-dopa), 200 m. The endemic South African succulent plant Sceletium tortuosum (L.) N.E. Br., family Mesembryathemaceae, is known as kanna in Nama, kougoed in Afrikaans, and sceletium in English.

Sceletium tortuosum contains mesembrine and the related alkaloids mesembranol and mesembranone. Mesembrine is known for its effects on the central nervous system. The compounds also act as serotonin-uptake inhibitors, and in specified doses act as anti-depressants, minor tranquilizers and anxiolytics used in the treatment of mild to moderate depression, psychological and psychiatric disorders.

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Bothhad a mail­order business selling blues, rhythm and blues,and gospel music, andmail ordersindicate that WLAC’s programs of rhythm andblues and gospel music reached listeners asfar asCanada, Mexico,the Caribbean, North Africa, andother international regions via shortwave radio.

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Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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