Outcomes Of Weight problems and Brain Shrinkage

 

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Video taken from the channel: BrainFacts.org


 

Obesity linked to smaller brain size, study says

Video taken from the channel: WSLS 10


 

Study finds link between obesity and breast cancer

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


 

The Link Between Obesity and Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Cancer.Net


 

How does obesity cause cancer?

Video taken from the channel: MD Anderson Cancer Center


 

Obesity And The Brain

Video taken from the channel: CBSDFW


 

Sugar Shrinks Your Brain?

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


“Existing research has linked brain shrinkage to memory decline and a higher risk of dementia, but research on whether extra body fat. Is obesity causing the brain to shrink? Or are people with smaller brain volumes more likely to become obese?Previous studies have also found a link between obesity and brain diseases such as dementia.

Still, the new study showed only an association between body fat and lower brain volume and can’t prove. A 2014 review suggested a link between obesity and brain shrinkage. In this paper, the authors suggest that because obesity increases inflammation in areas outside the brain, the body’s response to.

The study, which was conducted at Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, found that obese people appear to experience greater shrinkage in their brain tissue than normal-weight folks, and the changes often start to occur during middle age. 1 Dekkers, Ilona A.; et al. “Obesity, Brain Volume, and White Matter Microstructure at MRI. “Existing research has linked brain shrinkage to memory decline and a higher risk of dementia, but research on whether extra body fat.

“We also found links between obesity and shrinkage in specific regions of the brain. This will need further research but it may be possible that someday regularly measuring BMI and waist-to-hip. Lower brain volume, or brain shrinkage, has been linked with an increased risk of memory decline and dementia.

The new findings, published Jan. 9 in the journal Neurology, suggest that the combination of obesity (as measured by body mass index, or BMI) and a high waist-to-hip ratio may be a risk factor for brain shrinkage, the researchers said. However, the study found only an association between belly fat and lower brain volume, and cannot prove that carrying more fat around the waist actually causes brain shrinkage.

It could be that. Obesity may be linked with brain shrinkage (iStock / Nomadsoul1) Scientists have found a possible link between excess body fat and brain shrinkage, according to a new study. Researchers looked at a.

List of related literature:

Additionally, people who were simply overweight had 4 per cent less brain volume than their slimmer counterparts.

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Obesity is the result of genetic, behavioural, environmental, physiological, social and cultural factors that cause energy imbalance and promote excessive fat deposition.

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Brain-imaging studies also suggest that obese people’s brains may be slower to ‘read’ satiety signals coming from their blood, thus causing them to continue eating when leaner people would have stopped (Morton et al., 2006; Thorens, 2008).

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The brain suffers from obesity in other ways too, responding with a condition known as Pseudotumor cerebri.

“Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World” by Greg Critser
from Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World
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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004

Obesity is a chronic disorder that is caused by a complex interplay between environmental and genetic factors, which leads to a positive energy balance resulting from an excess of energy intake compared with energy expenditure.

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In other words, both familial genetic and nongenetic factors are involved in the etiology of overweight/obesity.

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from Growth, Maturation, and Physical Activity
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There is evidence that obesity, particularly in mid and later life, is a major risk factor for cognitive decline (Profenno et al. 2010), both directly and indirectly because the associated hypertension and type 2 diabetes increase the speed of vascular induced changes in the brain.

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Overeating and poorly balanced meals have also led to significant increases in metabolic syndrome (syndrome X) and obesity, which are now major health concerns.

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Important environmental factors driving the recent increased prevalence of obesity include increased caloric intake (reflecting greater availability of high-calorie, low-cost foods) and decreased energy expenditure (as a consequence of decreased physical activity).

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Additionally, the increased prevalence and severity of obesity in children has led to an increase in sleep disorders related to excess weight, such as the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and the hypoventilation syndrome.

“Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention” by Debasis Bagchi
from Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention
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Elsevier Science, 2010

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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3 comments

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  • Doesn’t coffee have sugar tho? And also those blueberries? We can’t stay 100% away from sugar. There’s sugar in almost anything we eat.

  • The amount of body fat you carry around may affect the form and structure of your brain, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed brain scans of more than 12,000 people… taken with sophisticated MRI techniques that provided information on both gray and white matter.  https://wcts.app/9Wu6B

  • Thank you. Great video. This is easy to use in psychology classes for a little extra sensory input. It really helps. But it would be even better if you added the References in the description!:) @ brainfacts.org