Monday Mindfulness How you can Slow Lower and revel in The Food More

 

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4. Now lower the food to your lips. Notice how your hand and arm know exactly where to position it. Notice how the food feels in your hand or on your fork.

5. Take a bite, but don’t chew. Just let the food rest on your tongue. 6. Notice any thoughts, feelings or sensations as you let the food sit in your mouth for a moment. 7. Now begin to.

It means, for example, to consciously perceive the fragrance and the taste of the food, to value every bite and to chew for a long time. Anyone who has ever eaten mindfully knows how enriching this experience can be. You can taste your food more consciously and deeply, all the many flavor nuances. In short: You’ll enjoy the meal more. Take the time to identify every flavor with each bite, by thoroughly chewing your food.

Don’t take or think about your next fork-full until you have fully enjoyed the previous one. Slowing down and fully chewing helps your body digest nutrients more efficiently and helps your mind register every mouthful, reducing your chances of overeating. Savor Your Food.

Choose healthy, nourishing foods. Bringing mindfulness to your daily routines can have a simple, deeply calming effect over time. Here are some of my favorite ways to practice mindfulness that don’t involve meditation: 1. Slowing down and using a beautiful soap or body oil in the morning, inhaling the essential oils as you care for your skin is being mindful. 2.

But, if we slow down, you can give your body a chance to catch up to your brain and hear the signals to eat the right amount. Simple ways to slow down might just include follow many of your grandmother’s manners, like sitting down to eat, chewing each bite 25 times (or more), setting your fork down between bites, and all those old manners that are maybe not as pointless as they seemed. Being mindful and paying attention to the food you eat, while you are eating it, could help you eat healthier. Learn how to make every bite a meditation. Make Every Bite a Meditation If you want to put healthier eating habits on the menu.

Make meal preparation inclusive. It will naturally be less tempting to take your time cooking if you see it as one more thing you have to do before you get to decompress from your long day. If you have a family, get them involved in preparing.

Or invite your friends over to cook together. 3. Chew your food slowly. And enjoy the texture and the taste! You’ll be more satisfied with less food and more likely to notice other subtleties throughout the day.

4. Write down your top three priorities for the day, first thing in the morning. Especially before you check your email. Mindful eating, or mindfulness eating, is a food strategy that helps people enjoy food more.

Find out more about mindful eating here. When you eat mindfully, you slow down, pay attention to the food you’re eating, and savor every bite.” – Susan Albers “So often, even when we stop to say a blessing before a meal, we’re mentally preparing to spoon some pasta or potatoes onto our plates.

List of related literature:

This mindful eating approach contains elements of Eastern mindfulness, cognitive factors, and DBT.

“The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness” by Amanda Ie, Christelle T. Ngnoumen, Ellen J. Langer
from The Wiley Blackwell Handbook of Mindfulness
by Amanda Ie, Christelle T. Ngnoumen, Ellen J. Langer
Wiley, 2014

Before I found meditation, I just bought the food and prepared it without once being mindful of these other aspects of my meal.

“The Mindful Vegan: A 30-Day Plan for Finding Health, Balance, Peace, and Happiness” by Lani Muelrath, Neal Barnard
from The Mindful Vegan: A 30-Day Plan for Finding Health, Balance, Peace, and Happiness
by Lani Muelrath, Neal Barnard
BenBella Books, Incorporated, 2017

Guiding Principle l: Bring Mindfulness to Your Eating Habits So many of us are in a food fog.

“Journey Into Power: How to Sculpt Your Ideal Body, Free Your True Self, and Transform Your Life with Yoga” by Baron Baptiste
from Journey Into Power: How to Sculpt Your Ideal Body, Free Your True Self, and Transform Your Life with Yoga
by Baron Baptiste
Atria Books, 2011

Mindful eating means staying focused on how each bite of food tastes, focusing again and again on this bite, this moment.

“The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourself from Worry & Anxiety Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy” by Chad LeJeune
from The Worry Trap: How to Free Yourself from Worry & Anxiety Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
by Chad LeJeune
New Harbinger Publications, 2007

I like to encourage “sensory-rotations”—focusing on one sense a week and applying that to your relationship with food and eating.

“The Rainbow Diet: A Holistic Approach to Radiant Health Through Foods and Supplements” by Deanna Minich
from The Rainbow Diet: A Holistic Approach to Radiant Health Through Foods and Supplements
by Deanna Minich
Mango Media, 2018

To use some of the mindfulness tools in this book, you may need to slow down—for example, while practicing mindful eating.

“How to Train a Wild Elephant: And Other Adventures in Mindfulness” by Jan Chozen Bays
from How to Train a Wild Elephant: And Other Adventures in Mindfulness
by Jan Chozen Bays
Shambhala, 2011

Before we work on mindfulness during eating, we need to become aware of what urges us to eat.

“Mindful Eating: A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food-includes C D” by Jan Chozen Bays
from Mindful Eating: A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food-includes C D
by Jan Chozen Bays
Shambhala, 2009

I like to encourage doing “sensory rotations” by focusing on one sense a week and applying that to your relationship with food and eating.

“Chakra Foods for Optimum Health: A Guide to the Foods That Can Improve Your Energy, Inspire Creative Changes, Open Your Heart, and Heal Body, Mind, and Spirit” by Deanna M. Minich
from Chakra Foods for Optimum Health: A Guide to the Foods That Can Improve Your Energy, Inspire Creative Changes, Open Your Heart, and Heal Body, Mind, and Spirit
by Deanna M. Minich
Mango Media, 2009

This is not meant to impart strict discipline and impulse control, merely a moment of mindfulness before you eat.

“One Second Ahead: Enhance Your Performance at Work with Mindfulness” by Rasmus Hougaard, Jacqueline Carter, Gillian Coutts
from One Second Ahead: Enhance Your Performance at Work with Mindfulness
by Rasmus Hougaard, Jacqueline Carter, Gillian Coutts
Palgrave Macmillan US, 2016

Here’s an exercise you can practice to help you get the idea of what mindfulness is all about: At your next meal or snack, slow yourself down and give the food your full attention.

“The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bipolar Disorder: Using DBT to Regain Control of Your Emotions and Your Life” by Sheri Van Dijk, Zindel V. Segal
from The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bipolar Disorder: Using DBT to Regain Control of Your Emotions and Your Life
by Sheri Van Dijk, Zindel V. Segal
New Harbinger Publications, 2009

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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6 comments

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  • Hi! Thanks for watching the video! Let me know your thoughts about mindful eating and give it a try! It will change the way you eat!

  • A stroke has forced me to slow down, but my mind is stil in this go-go-go mode. So I’m doing yoga nidra now twice a day for half an hour, which is helpful and try to focus as much as I can on the present moment. My mantra is don’t worry, don’t hurry, be hippie. I see myself as a hippie in training.

  • Hey Gabrielle, this video is what I needed to see today! A lot is happening right now with my online Affiliate Marketing business and it is so overwhelming, but I am loving everything. I will apply these tips because I do not want to lose my momentum. I want to just go with it and at the same time be a bit careful with my decision making. Thanks for sharing this.

  • Gabby, you are speaking to my soul. Lots of healing and self love since I started listening to you. I have been sharing your online book to close friends as well as strangers that quickly became friends from all over the world

  • Oh I forget the most important thing I appreciate that I am alive and breathing it not always easy but I doing cause it god choice for me to be here and with me too I have to learn w
    How to slow with my eating always rushing thru it and it not good and I writing too I trying to keep a journal and I writing fast to get thru with it my thoughts run crazy and my writing is so bad also my thoughts r so fast at times so I trying to slow but it hard sometimes thanks agian much love Adeline aka chubrocks

  • I’m forced to slow down after having a stroke. I used to live a high speed life in a newsroom and I notice now under how much pressure I was every day. I need to slow down in order to recover, so I’m trying to be a hippie a few times a day. Drinking tea and doing alternate nostril breathing. I’m trying to create a better and happier life post stroke than pre stroke.