Feeling Stressed Five Good reasons to Make Self-Care important

 

self care tips: 13 ways to relieve stress

Video taken from the channel: Lina Lecompte


 

Caregiver Series: Stress Management

Video taken from the channel: American Cancer Society


 

7 Effective Ways To Practice Self-Care And Manage Stress

Video taken from the channel: Preet Kalsi • Empowered Mindset Coach


 

Self-care for Caregivers | Linda Ercoli | TEDxUCLA

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

6 Tips to Manage Stress and Practice Self-Care

Video taken from the channel: Sharp HealthCare


 

Caregiver Series: Stress Management

Video taken from the channel: American Cancer Society


 

How to do Self-Care-And 3 Dumb Reasons You Don’t Do Self Care

Video taken from the channel: Therapy in a Nutshell


For the first time since the test was created in 2007, Americans broke the Psychologists’ Stress Record in a January 2017 survey. The devastating events in the world means there’s no shortage of reminders of things to be stressed about with stories everyday online about the most stressful places to live or work.With stress everywhere we. But even if your self-care regimen is top notch, there are some things you should know about stress.

Feeling less stressed isn’t just about relaxing in a bubble bath with a glass of wine and a. Here are some reasons why self-care is so important for stress relief. What People Get Wrong About Self-Care. The first thing to understand about self-care is that it comes in many forms, and might include activities and tasks that you never associated with selfcare.

In its essence, self-care is all about doing something for you and nobody else. It’s perfectly okay to feel sad, angry, annoyed, frustrated, scared, or anxious. Having feelings doesn’t make you a ‘negative person’. It makes you human. Lori Deschene The Practice of Emotional Self-Care. Authentic self-care is much more than treating yourself to a massage or a bubble bath, it is in every way that matters a lifestyle.

By its dictionary definition, self-care is the pro-active practice of taking action to preserve or improve your own health. And while this sounds like a simple, common-sense practice, if current statistics on increasing stress levels and the negative effects from our faster-than-ever paced society are any indicator, it seems that the vast majority do not practice much, if any, self-care. 5 Reasons Why You Should Make Self Care a Priority. To avoid this you need to make self care a priority.

When I had my first kid I jumped into parenthood with both feet and never looked back. All my time and energy went into being a mom and a wife. I loved it. and gives you a feeling of contentment. “Be there for others, but never leave yourself behind.” Dodinsky. Sometimes, when we’re feeling stressed and running around taking care of everybody else, the healthiest thing we can do is to stop and consider how we can take care of ourselves..

While this seems obvious to some people, many of us struggle with the idea of putting ourselves first. In a World of Anxiety and Chronic Stress, Self-Care Matters. Let’s first define self-care. Self-care is an active and conscious choice to engage in activities that nourish us and help us maintain an optimal level of overall health.

It basically means making healthy lifestyle choices and implementing stress management strategies. If you don’t have any close relationships, or your relationships are the source of your stress, make it a priority to build stronger and more satisfying connections. Engage your senses. Another fast way to relieve stress is by engaging one or more of your senses —sight, sound, taste, smell, touch, or movement.

8 Reasons Why Self-Care Should be Your Top Priority September 15, 2019 / 25 Comments With the world growing ever-so-smaller and ever-so-busier, terms like ‘priority lists’ and ‘3-year plans’ and ‘5-year plans’ have become very mundane to us.

List of related literature:

Six coping behaviors that include efforts to be more organized and in charge of the situation (trying to make one’s own decision, figuring out how to deal with the problem, trying to think of the good things in life, or working harder at a job).

“Handbook of Coping: Theory, Research, Applications” by Moshe Zeidner, Norman S. Endler
from Handbook of Coping: Theory, Research, Applications
by Moshe Zeidner, Norman S. Endler
Wiley, 1995

• Ways to manage stress include developing selfawareness, taking care of one’s own needs, thinking positively, asserting oneself, asking others for help and support, practising calming exercises, and learning to accept the things that cannot be changed.

“Mosby's Canadian Textbook for the Support Worker E-Book” by Sheila A Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert, MS RN, Mary J Wilk
from Mosby’s Canadian Textbook for the Support Worker E-Book
by Sheila A Sorrentino, Leighann Remmert, MS RN, Mary J Wilk
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

For instance, a study found that freely selecting activities to engage (autonomy; a basic need according to Self Determination Theory; Ryan and Deci 2017) are significantly more related to reduced stress as compared to forced activities (Ferguson et al. 2018).

“Game User Experience And Player-Centered Design” by Barbaros Bostan
from Game User Experience And Player-Centered Design
by Barbaros Bostan
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Participating in self-care can promote positive coping; making decisions decreases feelings of powerlessness.

“Medical-Surgical Nursing” by Priscilla LeMone, Karen Burke, Trudy Dwyer, Tracy Levett-Jones, Lorna Moxham, Kerry Reid-Searl
from Medical-Surgical Nursing
by Priscilla LeMone, Karen Burke, et. al.
Pearson Australia, 2015

These coping resources include the 4 S’s—Situation, Self, Support, and Strategies.

“Counseling Adults in Transition: Linking Schlossberg's Theory With Practice in a Diverse World” by Mary Anderson, PhD, Jane Goodman, PhD, Nancy K. Schlossberg, EdD
from Counseling Adults in Transition: Linking Schlossberg’s Theory With Practice in a Diverse World
by Mary Anderson, PhD, Jane Goodman, PhD, Nancy K. Schlossberg, EdD
Springer Publishing Company, 2011

Even making a list of stresses and unfulfilled obligations can paradoxically reduce pressure.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Self-care strategies that support, strengthen, deepen, replenish, and enliven may, less than a year later, become a senseless obligation, distraction, and waste of time.

“Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide” by Kenneth S. Pope, Melba J. T. Vasquez
from Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide
by Kenneth S. Pope, Melba J. T. Vasquez
Wiley, 2010

Assess self-care abilities, including activities of daily living (ADLs) such as bathing, hygiene, dressing, toileting, eating, walking, housekeeping, shopping, cooking, communicating with others, social relationships, finances, and coping.

“Physical Examination and Health Assessment Canadian E-Book” by Carolyn Jarvis, Annette J. Browne, June MacDonald-Jenkins, Marian Luctkar-Flude
from Physical Examination and Health Assessment Canadian E-Book
by Carolyn Jarvis, Annette J. Browne, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

To manage stressful behaviours in others low arousal approaches require us to reflect about our own stress and the impact it has on other family members.

“Managing Family Meltdown: The Low Arousal Approach and Autism” by Linda Woodcock, Andrew Mcdonnell, Andrea Page
from Managing Family Meltdown: The Low Arousal Approach and Autism
by Linda Woodcock, Andrew Mcdonnell, Andrea Page
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2009

For example, obstacles addressed in a snack routine maintenance plan for the mother of the 4-year-old boy with severe food refusal behavior included (a) child or parent illness or tiredness/fatigue and (b) parent stress and anxiety.

“Handbook of Positive Behavior Support” by Wayne Sailor, Glen Dunlap, George Sugai, Rob Horner
from Handbook of Positive Behavior Support
by Wayne Sailor, Glen Dunlap, et. al.
Springer US, 2008

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

View all posts

6 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Hey Emma, I would like to thank you for ur content. I believed I’ve watched all of ur playlist and they helps me a lot! My most recent ones were the topics about emotional safety and I love it!

  • Hi Emma,
    Thank you so much fordoing ehat you do. We appreciate you.
    In a different video you had said that if we wanted to take your Udemy class for free to send you a private message… I just realized private messages are no longer available, so I’m commenting here and asking if you could help me take it for free? I have struggled with feelings of anxiousness often and in the past week, uncomfortable and sometimes paniful pelvic floor tension has been a struggle. I really appreciate your help videos, and would appreciate being able to take the class ❤️.

  • Oh noo I’m glad you’re doing better now!! Yay for taking care of our bodies, both physically and mentally ❤️Loved this video, You Are a Bada** is one of my favourites to read back on too:)

  • When I feel I need to do more, I need to ask myself whether it’s from my misguided belief that my self worth is determined by others approval and acknowledgement, which often lead to unreasonable expectations on other people and disappointments, falling into exhaustion and self pity in the end. Watching Emma’s videos is one of my ways to care about myself. Thank you always.

  • Well that was a different analogy than I usually hear. “Sharpen your axe.” I’d love to hear that more often “What are you doing?” “Sharpening my metaphorical axe.”

  • I know that self care is important, and I try to do it.

    What if the family that you live with doesn’t allow you to have time for self care? Like if they see you doing things for self care, they say “Oh you have time for that? Then when you said you have no free time, you were lying. You should do these things for me.” And when I explain that I need to take a break because it’s not healthy to always be on active mode, they argue “You think I don’t want to take a break too?” And they don’t respect my boundaries?

    Thanks in advance for your advice.