Do Exercise Non-Responders Exist

 

Lat “Non-Responder” Solution (LATS WON’T GROW!)

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Is there such a thing as an exercise “Non-Responder?” [Ask Ben Ep.3]

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If you don’t have great Muscle Building Genetics… (Some Motivation)

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Research Review Episode 1 Do Non-Responders to Exercise Exist?

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Are You An Exercise Non Responder?!

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WHY YOU CAN’T GAIN MUSCLE & STRENGTH (Genetic Non Responder??)

Video taken from the channel: TappBrothers


It is well established that exercise is an important component in the maintenance of good health, and yet recent studies have demonstrated that a sub-section of individuals experience no significant improvements following an exercise training intervention. Such individuals are commonly termed “non-responders”. It is well established that exercise is an important component in the maintenance of good health, and yet recent studies have demonstrated that a sub-section of individuals experience no significant improvements following an exercise training intervention. Such individuals are commonly termed “non-responders”.

A number of studies over the years have identified alleged “non-responders” as those subjects who do not seem to demonstrate any significant improvements in strength, power output, or the amount of lean muscle mass they’ve gained from the beginning of an exercise trial until its conclusion. [1][2][3]. As such, it appears that non-response may be modality-specific; whilst previous authors have suggested that global non-responders to exercise are likely to exist [ 13 ], this is not currently supported by experimental data. A second, less fully appreciated issue relates to the inherent variability of intra-individual adaptive responses. As a result,it is notclear whether exercise nonresponsetoagivenstimulusisstaticandunchangeable, remaininguniformwhenrepeated,ordynamic,with“non

Sharrow’s “twin” is an example of what some call a “non-responder” to his exercise routine, or someone who’s working out but not achieving the results he or she wants or expects, be it a trimmer. As you can see, there are lots of non-responders among those training once or twice a week, a few in the three-workout group, and none in the fouror five-workout groups. Cardiovascular Exercise. non-responders see more results when they get out of steady state cardio and work to increase both intensity and duration of their workouts.

Recover in a way that progresses your workout. You can do some dynamic stretches or work on your form for the next exercise in your set with little to no weight. Sabrena Jo, senior exercise scientist at the American Council on Exercise, agrees, noting that one issue with research about non-responders is that the exercise interventions are generally short.

The Myth of Non-Responders to Exercise We live in a body that has evolved to respond to environmental stimuli in order to survive. Now that we no longer need to run away from fast animals with big claws and teeth and no longer have to physically hunt for our food, we use this evolutionary adaptation to get fitter.

List of related literature:

Few enough people perform aerobic exercise regularly, but even fewer engage in regular strength training.

“Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever” by Ray Kurzweil, Terry Grossman
from Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever
by Ray Kurzweil, Terry Grossman
Rodale Books, 2010

Interestingly, in overfat and obese participants, fat mass was reduced by increasing resistance exercise but was not changed with increasing aerobic exercise.

“Physiology of Sport and Exercise” by W. Larry Kenney, Jack H. Wilmore, David L. Costill
from Physiology of Sport and Exercise
by W. Larry Kenney, Jack H. Wilmore, David L. Costill
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2019

There are, however, some other considerations when choosing what exercises to perform.

“Optimizing Strength Training: Designing Nonlinear Periodization Workouts” by William J. Kraemer, Steven J. Fleck
from Optimizing Strength Training: Designing Nonlinear Periodization Workouts
by William J. Kraemer, Steven J. Fleck
Human Kinetics, 2007

Some may presume that exercise responses to resistance training would be similar to those seen in the able-bodied population, but no data have been presented to prove or refute such a hypothesis.

“Spinal Cord Injuries E-Book: Management and Rehabilitation” by Sue Ann Sisto, Erica Druin, Martha Macht Sliwinski
from Spinal Cord Injuries E-Book: Management and Rehabilitation
by Sue Ann Sisto, Erica Druin, Martha Macht Sliwinski
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

They may also believe that exercise is unimportant or unnecessary (e.g., “I’m perfectly healthy and have no need for exercise”), or that exercise will not produce a desired outcome (e.g., reduced body fat).

“The Psychology of Exercise: Integrating Theory and Practice” by Curt L. Lox, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis, Steven J. Petruzzello
from The Psychology of Exercise: Integrating Theory and Practice
by Curt L. Lox, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis, Steven J. Petruzzello
Taylor & Francis, 2016

So, any logical person can deduct that the kind of exercise we engage in directly affects the way our body is shaped.

“Escape Your Shape: How to Work Out Smarter, Not Harder” by Edward Jackowski
from Escape Your Shape: How to Work Out Smarter, Not Harder
by Edward Jackowski
Atria Books, 2001

There is one dryland exercise exception, but it doesn’t require the use of weights or a weight machine.

“The Triathlete's Training Bible: The World’s Most Comprehensive Training Guide, 4th Ed.” by Joe Friel
from The Triathlete’s Training Bible: The World’s Most Comprehensive Training Guide, 4th Ed.
by Joe Friel
VeloPress, 2016

People could still exercise if they wanted to, but they would do so only because they chose to, not because they had to.

“Practical Philosophy of Sport and Physical Activity” by Robert Scott Kretchmar
from Practical Philosophy of Sport and Physical Activity
by Robert Scott Kretchmar
Human Kinetics, 2005

Hence, the conversion from physical education to exercise science to exercise physiology is still evolving.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

Exercise has been found to both induce NO production and alter the expression of the various NOS isoforms.

“Nutrition and Enhanced Sports Performance: Muscle Building, Endurance, and Strength” by Debasis Bagchi, Sreejayan Nair, Chandan K. Sen
from Nutrition and Enhanced Sports Performance: Muscle Building, Endurance, and Strength
by Debasis Bagchi, Sreejayan Nair, Chandan K. Sen
Elsevier Science, 2013

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

[email protected]

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17 comments

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  • Good bid as usual. Thanks! I trained 3 high schoolers together, same program, for 4 months, all fitness newbies. One a significant outlier with unusual, quick size and strength increase. While the other 2 progressed expectedly, one did more so with upper body strength, the other with lower.

  • why do they assume this is genetic and non-treatable, what if its nutrional deficiences or genetic things that are treatable like hormonal imbalances, for example the 10% of people who don’t for intance don’t gain muscular strenght could, for instance, just have lower testosterone levels/other hormone imbalance or possibly thier bodys can’t absorb a particular nutrient, these possible factors need to also be studied.

  • Thank you, Abel. Only recently found your channel. Your content is refreshingly honest. Feels like you’re answering all the questions / thoughts I have in my own head about training / body composition goals. Life is much more.

  • It sucks working your ass off in the gym, having proper sleep, progressively overloading and still seeing 0 results because it’s almost impossible for me to stuff my body with high calorie dense foods to the point where i’m painfully force feeding myself everyday. There is always one variable missing and so far i have gone from being extremely skinny to looking skinny but normal in 10 months. Newbie gains didn’t really hit me that much and if every variable is not perfectly on point nothing will change and I don’t want to commit my whole fucking life to this so i think i should just give it all up…

  • Did all these things. Sleep, nutrition, trainer. Didn’t matter my body refuses to build muscle. Skinny fat, big gut, tiny arms and skinny legs. 6 months into an expensive workout plan, all that happened was some minor weight loss. Still looked the same and peaked 3 month in to weight lifting. Mixed it up and attempted multiple other times in my life with different gyms, trainers and diets. Nope doesn’t work. It’s definitely genetic as all my family on both sides have no one who had a good physique.
    I’ve watched my fat friends lose weight and get ripped in a year. It’s so frustrating. I sometimes hate myself.

  • Anyone tried the Custokebon Secrets? I have heard several unbelivable things about it and my sister lost lots of weight with Custokebon Secrets (search on google).

  • That does not make sense. What about people who have taken into account everything that has been suggested in this video and still complain that they are a genetic non-responser? 1.82m tall, ectomorphic, fast metabolism and miserable genes. Any suggestion?

  • Nutrition and sleep doesn’t change anything for me. I can eat shit and get no sleep and will get exactly the same results as if I’m eating healthy and being responsible with sleep.

  • Don’t buy into this bullshit guys, if their trying to sell u a guide or ebook, more offers than not its a gimmick mixed with general facts.

  • And you’d be incorrect. There are non responders to exercise and that’s been seen in studies for decades. No one knew why they didn’t respond, and that’s where modern genetic testing comes in. Google “The workout Enigma” which is a good read from NY TImes for non science types.

  • this is really hard to manage with a fulltime job you get like no rest time. so glad i transitioned to working from home with better pay so i am not stuck on the clock…. praying for anyone who is going through that tho the worst!

  • Way back when I was a teenager, I had a buddy who did the same routine I did and saw waaay more results than I did. I was very pissed off about it. Unfortunately, that’s just how life goes sometimes. He started lifting heavier and lasted longer. I mimicked his diet, thinking that was the issue. Nope. Same fucking results. He became leagues ahead of me. Was strong as hell and got all of the ladies attention in high school. Wish I could say something negative to compensate and even the playing field but nope. He was an all around nice and honest guy too. That beautiful sonnofa bitch.

  • There is no such thing as muscle.non.responder. its not physiologically possible.for body to not respond all you need is proper technique and good nutrition along with heavy weight training to see results

  • It’s not that, yo go to the gym, and magically increase. Eat all the vegetarian diet, non-vegeterian diet, dry fruits, fruits all the shit. Still can’t grow any fuckin Muscle. Gym, diet nothing helps at all

  • Changing your workout is huge. Repeating that same never shocks your muscle memory and just turns into a repetitive muscle injury.

  • Because he loves the journey. I thought about this myself the other day (about me). If I did gear and was 20kg heavier when I dieted down would I be happier as a person, no.

    I think it depends on the perspective, you seem (I may be wrong) to think that this is an outcome based goal rather than a processed based one.

  • I don’t think there are non-responders exercise people, i was a hard gainer, because i was doing the wrong exercises, but of course, with good genetics, better and faster are the gains.