Running Injury 101 How to handle the five Most Typical Ailments

 

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How to Prevent One of the Most Common Running Injuries

Video taken from the channel: Keck Medicine of USC


 

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Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

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Video taken from the channel: New England Baptist Hospital


Most runners have as many injury stories as they do training shoes in their closets. In fact, it may seem as though you can’t truly call yourself a runner unless you have an orthopedic surgeon or a physical therapist on speed dial. The sport’s simplicity— its repetitive and weight-bearing nature—also accounts for its tendency to. The five most common injuries that sideline runners are Shin Splints, Runner’s Knee, IT Band Syndrome, Achilles Tendinitis, and Plantar Fasciitis.

Each of them can be avoided by adding some simple strength training exercises to your fitness routine. According to research, runners most often sustain injuries to their knees, legs, and feet. Learn more about the most common types of running injuries and what you can do. According to some studies, nearly 80% of injuries are caused due to repetitive stress, and some of the causes behind sudden injuries are torn muscles or sprained ankle as well.

And, now it’s time to know some of the most common running injuries that happen during running. Most Common Types of Running Injuries. 1.

To help you make that comeback that you so eagerly desire, this article will highlight five things you should do once you have a running injury. This article is brought to you by Matthew from Running101. Running101 provides quality training tips, gear reviews, the latest running news, and more – helping you take your running to the next level.

The Most Common Running Injuries and How to Avoid Them. Here are 12 of the most common ailments that plague those who hit the pavement, along with a. Common Running Injuries: Back Pain Morton’s neuroma Morton’s neuroma occurs when a fibrous tissue grows around a nerve in the foot. The symptoms are the same or similar to metatarsalgia, but also include burning or tingling sensations, numbness, and/or a sharp, stabbing or shooting pains.

Excessive or abrupt increases in running mileage Preexisting iliotibial band tightness Too much downhill running Too much unidirectional running around a track Too much running on cambered roads, which causes overpronation Stiff shoes that limit pronation. The following four foot injuries are the most common ailments. Learn what causes these types of foot pain and, more importantly, how runners can avoid the dreaded “I” word. Plantar Fasciitis. Nearly every runner knows the plantar fascia tendon. Most are overuse strains, sprains, and stress fractures; most to lower extremities (ankle/foot, knee/lower leg).

More than half of these injuries are exercise or sports-related, especially running. Back and shoulder injuries are also common, more often associated with lifting and carrying activities. Technical references.

List of related literature:

Of importance, the most common injuries were strains, tendinitis and sprains, making up 44.8%, 24.2% and 13 % of injury types, respectively, with strains being the most common in the lower back and shoulder, and tendinitis most common in the knees.

“Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance” by Anthony Turner
from Routledge Handbook of Strength and Conditioning: Sport-specific Programming for High Performance
by Anthony Turner
Taylor & Francis, 2018

Below are the five most common running injuries: Achilles tendinitis, chondromalacia, iliotibial band syndrome, plantar fasciitis, and shinsplints.

“Runner's World Complete Book of Running: Everything You Need to Run for Weight Loss, Fitness, and Competition” by Amby Burfoot
from Runner’s World Complete Book of Running: Everything You Need to Run for Weight Loss, Fitness, and Competition
by Amby Burfoot
Rodale Books, 2009

Eliminate the list of injuries.

“The Jealousy Cure: Learn to Trust, Overcome Possessiveness, and Save Your Relationship” by Robert L. Leahy, Paul Gilbert
from The Jealousy Cure: Learn to Trust, Overcome Possessiveness, and Save Your Relationship
by Robert L. Leahy, Paul Gilbert
New Harbinger Publications, 2018

The BAA prepares its volunteers to treat the problems most often seen after running 26.2 miles: dehydration; sodium imbalances; hyperand hypothermia; orthopedic strains, sprains, fractures, and blisters; and the potential for fatal cardiac issues.

“Physician Assistant: A Guide to Clinical Practice E-Book” by Ruth Ballweg, Darwin Brown, Daniel Vetrosky, Tamara S Ritsema
from Physician Assistant: A Guide to Clinical Practice E-Book
by Ruth Ballweg, Darwin Brown, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

To effectively treat the runner with an overuse injury of the lower extremity and foot, the clinician must understand normal running mechanics so that he or she can determine the causes of repetitive trauma and inflammation secondary to tissue stress.

“Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book” by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, William S. Quillen, Robert C. Manske
from Athletic and Sport Issues in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book
by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Chronic injuries were more common, reported in 59%, 54%, and 56% of athletes, respectively.14 Acute injuries are considerably more common during adventure races when compared with triathlons.

“Wilderness Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features” by Paul S. Auerbach
from Wilderness Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features
by Paul S. Auerbach
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

The following are the most common overuse injuries seen in runners.

“Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine” by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
from Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine
by Lyle J. Micheli, M.D.
SAGE Publications, 2010

This suggests a need to better understand the causes of running injuries.

“Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation E-Book: An Evidence-Based Approach Expert Consult” by S. Brent Brotzman, Robert C. Manske
from Clinical Orthopaedic Rehabilitation E-Book: An Evidence-Based Approach Expert Consult
by S. Brent Brotzman, Robert C. Manske
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Twenty (5,6) to thirty-five (3) percent of these injuries are unrecognized or misdiagnosed.

“McGlamry's Comprehensive Textbook of Foot and Ankle Surgery” by The Podiatry Institute, Joe T. Southerland, Jeffrey S. Boberg, Michael S. Downey, Aprajita Nakra, Linnie V. Rabjohn
from McGlamry’s Comprehensive Textbook of Foot and Ankle Surgery
by The Podiatry Institute, Joe T. Southerland, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2012

Injured runners typically are told to “rest” or follow the typical advice of RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation).

“Anatomy for Runners: Unlocking Your Athletic Potential for Health, Speed, and Injury Prevention” by Jay Dicharry
from Anatomy for Runners: Unlocking Your Athletic Potential for Health, Speed, and Injury Prevention
by Jay Dicharry
Skyhorse, 2012

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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4 comments

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  • When I run, literally as soon as I start, my ankles start to seize up, they get very painful, then the pain radiates up my shins. My ankles basically go numb and I end up stomping. It hurts SO incredibly much! I’m 18, and not sporty, but slim. I thought it was shin splints, but apparently only athletic people get that!:) Any ideas of what is wrong with meeeee? 

  • So much more that can be done about running injuries its not just rest, ice and orthotics.
    How about getting to the root cause of the problem? These measures suggested are treating the symptoms, not the cause.
    Teach yourself how to mobilise your foot, learn how to move your body with Feldenkrais, and watch a few videos about technique so you can play with the elements whilst you run. Seek out expert advice on which conditioning drills are most appropriate for you. There are no recipes, we are all different shapes and sizes and require different combinations of muscles/fascia released and realigned.

  • Why give the suggestion to ice everything? You do realize icing only prolongs most injuries right? It takes down the swelling so now the body has no defense mechanism to protect the actual injury.

  • If you’re getting calf pain when running, try these videos to figure out how to address your issues https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BJ0ZYUYIqU&list=PLKcBI9vYDGiSXxHxg7LIwTa9fXLmkEd5S