Here’s your Brain on Exercise

 

THIS IS YOUR BRAIN … ON EXERCISE

Video taken from the channel: Ivanhoe Web


 

WHY Exercise is so Underrated (Brain Power & Movement Link)

Video taken from the channel: What I’ve Learned


 

How Exercise Benefits Your Brain Exercise and The Brain (animated)

Video taken from the channel: Better Than Yesterday


 

Your Brain on Exercise

Video taken from the channel: Healthfirst NY


 

Your Brain on Exercise

Video taken from the channel: BrainFacts.org


 

This is Your Brain on Exercise (Mental Health Guru)

Video taken from the channel: Healthguru


 

How Exercise Can Help with ADHD (and How to Actually Do It)

Video taken from the channel: How to ADHD


Your brain becomes much more active during exercise, “perhaps more active than at any other time,” says Maddock. One way neurons communicate is. Exercise may keep your brain sharp.

Research published in Nature suggests that people who exercise more have increased gray matter volume in their brains. Gray matter houses nerons important to memory. Other research found more gray matter in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortexes of the brains of more physically fit people. People who exercise have better mental fitness, and a new imaging study from UC Davis Health System shows why.

Intense exercise increases levels of two common neurotransmitters — glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA — that are responsible for chemical messaging within the brain. Published in The Journal of Neuroscience, the finding offers new insights into brain. If you want to boost your brain power, you have to boost your exercise as well. Some studies have also shown that aerobic exercise can improve performance on thinking tests in.

This is your brain on exercise A profile MRI of the brain with color shaded areas corresponding to areas of increased gray matter volume in active people. The blue crosshairs point to. University of California Davis Health System. “This is your brain on exercise: Vigorous exercise boosts critical neurotransmitters, may help restore mental health.”. Getting fit is often seen as a way to get body-wide benefits inside and out — from a leaner and stronger physique to better cardiovascular health.

But another organ surprisingly also sees plenty of advantages when you work up a sweat: your brain. “Your brain is wired to respond positively to exercise,” says Loretta Graziano Breuning, PhD, author of “Habits of a Happy Brain.” “When you exercise. Exercise triggers the production of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, which helps support the growth of existing brain cells and the development of new ones. With age, BDNF levels fall; this decline is one reason brain function deteriorates in the elderly. Apparently TJ was on to something: Aerobic exercise and weight training improve brain function in a variety of ways, according to a review of more than.

This Is Your Brain On Exercise People who exercise have better mental fitness, and a new imaging study from UC Davis Health System shows why. Intense exercise increases levels of two common neurotransmitters — glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA — that are responsible for chemical messaging within the brain.

List of related literature:

But what exactly does exercise do to your brain?

“Power Foods for the Brain: An Effective 3-Step Plan to Protect Your Mind and Strengthen Your Memory” by Neal D Barnard
from Power Foods for the Brain: An Effective 3-Step Plan to Protect Your Mind and Strengthen Your Memory
by Neal D Barnard
Grand Central Publishing, 2013

When you exercise, your brain releases BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), a chemical that helps you create new brain cells.

“The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy” by Chris Bailey
from The Productivity Project: Accomplishing More by Managing Your Time, Attention, and Energy
by Chris Bailey
Random House of Canada, 2016

It is well known that exercise can cause changes in brain cortical activity.

“Handbook of Sport Psychology” by Gershon Tenenbaum, Robert C. Eklund
from Handbook of Sport Psychology
by Gershon Tenenbaum, Robert C. Eklund
Wiley, 2020

If the brain is like a muscle, then shouldn’t brain exercises help?

“Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging” by Dr. Alan D. Castel
from Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging
by Dr. Alan D. Castel
Oxford University Press, 2018

You’re exercising because you want to move your brain.

“Brain Rules for Aging Well: 10 Principles for Staying Vital, Happy, and Sharp” by John Medina
from Brain Rules for Aging Well: 10 Principles for Staying Vital, Happy, and Sharp
by John Medina
Pear Press, 2017

And, like a muscle, your brain gets tired when you exercise it.

“Introduction to Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback: Advanced Theory and Applications” by James R. Evans, Thomas H. Budzynski, Helen Kogan Budzynski, Andrew Abarbanel
from Introduction to Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback: Advanced Theory and Applications
by James R. Evans, Thomas H. Budzynski, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2009

The brain also seems to anticipate changes in the metabolic rate caused by exercise, because parallel increases occur in the output from the motor cortex to the exercising limbs and to respiratory neurons.

“The Respiratory System” by Kara Rogers Senior Editor, Biomedical Sciences
from The Respiratory System
by Kara Rogers Senior Editor, Biomedical Sciences
Britannica Educational Pub., 2010

Brain glycogen decreases during prolonged exercise.

“Sports and Exercise Nutrition” by William D. McArdle
from Sports and Exercise Nutrition
by William D. McArdle
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2018

When you exercise, your brain gets

“Happy For No Reason: 7 Steps to Being Happy From the Inside Out” by Marci Shimoff, Carol Kline
from Happy For No Reason: 7 Steps to Being Happy From the Inside Out
by Marci Shimoff, Carol Kline
Simon & Schuster UK, 2008

According to this hypothesis, brain catecholaminergic activity is altered through exercise.

“Behavioral Addictions: Criteria, Evidence, and Treatment” by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, MD, Laura Curtiss Feder, PsyD
from Behavioral Addictions: Criteria, Evidence, and Treatment
by Kenneth Paul Rosenberg, MD, Laura Curtiss Feder, PsyD
Elsevier Science, 2014

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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49 comments

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  • My favorite exercise is the VR video game Beat Saber. It’s like guitar hero and fruit ninja had a baby in virtual reality, and its the reason why I gained 5 lbs of muscle over the last year lol. It works really well for me because I hate “traditional” exercise and love videogames, so my brain sees it as a game first, and exercise second. Though, I often have to remind myself to pace myself, because I’ve definitely injured my shoulders quite a bit by pushing myself too hard because I reaaaalllly wanted to beat a hard difficulty of a certain song. Whoopsies lol.

  • Your video inspired me so much! I never did sports. Now I go to the gym cause I want the sauna after and then I actually have fun doing the thing!! I combined all your helpful stuff for my purpose: I put a Screenshot of your video on the shelf, where my sportbag goes. So I don’t go do sports I go let my brain have a dopamine party 😉 Prepacking helps a lot! so if I could go, there is no packing/deciding… It’s just grab’n’go.
    Also rephrasing it helps me so much!
    And ding fun stuff like making a Playlist for me to run in my rhythm is fun too. If anyone is looking for an runningplaylist mixed out of 80rock, opera, Elvis and medieval folc… ���� Since I started I an still shook myself that it worked. But I’m still doing it. 4. Month, 1-2 x per week. I’m proud.:) and I’m thankful for this video, that got me there! ❤️����

  • definitely recommend biking! I bike almost everyday and I swear it is the most exciting and fun part of my day. It reduces anxiety and literally frees the mind

  • This is really helpful! For me actually leaving the house is the big challenge so I guess I’m going to find ways to work out at home.

  • Question time.
    My mom and my daughter are diagnosed with ADHD, iv managed 30 years of life 11 years with my husband, 10 years with kids (we have 4) without a diagnosis. I don’t even know what I think i have because I can relate to a lot of things. Do you think i should try for a diagnosis? Are there any reliable online tests i could start with?

  • I hate exercise. I don’t mean that in a haha ‘like taking cough medication’ hate. I mean like I will go out of my way to avoid moving faster than a brisk walk. But when I put on a costume and have a few other nerds (also in costume) swinging foam? I’ve had LARP campers where I’ve covered over 15 miles between walking and running. For me, getting exercise in meant taking advantage of my ADHD and putting myself in a situation where I was constantly distracted by something.

  • I joined a beginner’s derby team to provide that accountability you mention… in January this year. So that hasn’t been happening and my brand-new (to me) skates are gathering dust in my garage.

  • Really appreciate your channel. I was diagnosed with ADHD as an adult, and I’m still working on developing healthy coping mechanisms. Every little bit helps, and this channel has offered more than a little bit.

  • But goddamn when I’m excersising at home and when Im not at the gym, I sometimes get completely fucked up and I can’t even continue when I’m barely even started. It’s like there is no fucking motivation at all. I know it helps my mood, but some days I just can’t do it. What do i do then? How do I pick up and continue? Because usually if I dont workout, I end up having the worst case of emptiness

  • I found getting a more active job helps. I have to exercise then and while I’m doing an activity so I don’t notice I’m exercising. I probably push myself more while working than I ever would at the gym.

  • I suggest hiit workouts. They can be as short as ten minutes. They are intense but keep you interested and are really good for you even if it’s only ten minutes.

  • Hey thanks this video sure help. Im ADHD and can’t focus well here, I’m coping for like almost 31years. And this is very frustrating.

  • Hello!
    I loved your videos very much coz my friend has ADHD and it helps me to know about it and I try to help my friend through your guidances so thank you so much for that!
    I just have a doubt that my friend wants to exercise but he has exercise sickness kind of thing (I actually don’t remember the exact word) so what should I do?

  • YOGA therapy and Ayurveda panchacarma treatment in.. Kerala and Thamil Nadu(India) for Special kids,More information WhatsApp number:+919940996468,I know the Institution.. 100% Result… They will change your kids mind and body…

  • Great video and very useful. I’ve generally been a pretty active person, especially when I was in my early teens, but lately college got in the way then quarantine caused my motivation to plummet, so these days the majority of my “exercise” is just walking my dog or taking out the trash. This was really motivating though.

    Alright, I’ll commit. Starting tomorrow (it’s too late tonight) I’ll go for a run or bike ride each morning. I’m putting a page in my bullet journal called “exercise log”. Let’s see how this goes.

  • I start exercising (doing things I like) and always get so overwhelmingly bored in a month and quit. My mind drifts often while I’m lifting weights, doing cardio or dancing even though I like those things. It’s so frustrating ��

  • I can not tell you how much these videos mean to me. I am 55 and struggle with my ADHD everyday all day. These videos are funny, informative and just what I need. As soon as I have discretionary income I am becoming a patron!!!! So worth supporting.

  • You are officially my favorite YouTuber!!! Runkeeper is a great app for runners it asks how the run was as soon as it is finished, and you can go back later and enter notes (actually going to use this for important stuff instead of “it was 100 degrees and I wanted to die”)

  • Geeeez, alright YouTube algorithm!
    I go out of my bed, start eating healthy and go exercise already!
    But just stop recommending me healthy videos already! Staying fat is a choice!

  • I definitely cannot agree more with the disclaimers lol Once upon a time, I decided I would start working out again… by immediately diving into a 45 minute P-90X ab workout! LOL It was’t more than 5 or so minutes into the workout that I felt a sort of… pop?? Whatever it was, it did not feel great, and the next day I woke up unable to fully stretch my body straight/upright… I was only able to walk slowly, hunched over like a 100 year-old. I kept trying to stretch and loosen things up, but nothing worked… 2 or 3 days into it, I FINALLY Googled what could have happened, and I realized that I had strained my hip flexors… a common injury in runners it seems. Counterintuitively, the actual correct thing to do was to AVOID try to stretch the muscles at all and to stay in a hunch position while standing, and a fetal position while sleeping. A day or two later, it was fine again! So word to the wise, folks… DO NOT overestimate your ability to do a particular workout… especially after not being active at all for a long time lol

  • So starting today, I get to rebuild my working out routine, and add social distancing / safety precautions / PPE to the mix. But I’m so ready to get back to the gym. I miss it a lot. Regular exercise really helps my brain, both mood and function. And getting stronger is also fun and satisfying. It’s like leveling up in an RPG, except it comes with the ability to shock your neighbors when they see the gamer girl next door lift a couch by herself.:D

  • About 8 months ago I finally found exercise that I absolutely love: swordfighting (H.E.M.A.) Since quarantine we haven’t been able to train, but maybe next week we’re allowed to train as long as we keep distance and there is no contact. Here’s to hoping!
    I tried to do yoga, but after about two weeks fell off the wagon and now it’s just not happening anymore…

  • my problem with organized sports is that I get bored. It feels like we’re doing the same thing every practice. Then I don’t want to do it anymore even if it’s actually a sport I enjoy. Any tips?

  • You’re amazing. Thank you. You’ve been such a huge help to me. I was diagnosed as an adult just this January—I’m 26—and was going to start medications for my ADHD, but then COVID happened. These videos help me so so much. So thank you so much. You’re amazing.

  • I played DDR for an hour straight trying to get at least a B+ on one song and I finally did it! I do nOt exercise and if I do it is very rare. Yes I am thin but very unhealthy. Knowing the benefits is amazing. And after dancing I felt way more alive than ever. And I wonder why I am constantly confused and tired all the time lol

  • My favorite kind is doing push ups, star jumps, burpies and all that jazz while watching bread rise. Then the next morning wow fresh bread. (Black/dark rye bread is best bread btw)

  • I have yet to find any form of exercise that’s not boring AF. And I don’t get the endorphin thing. Exercise makes me feel like dog poop.

  • I personally am a swing dancer, if I could do it every day I would, but it’s a two person activity, so I can’t do it unless I’m specifically with people who know how to.:/

  • but what if the things you like you either have no space or no money for… i like games.. but i don’t have enough space in my room to do something like just dance.. or wii fit for that matter. then other stuff like VR or something else i would find fun would just be too expensive.. and well i don’t like my other options like regular sports.. i’m hydrophobic so swimming isn’t going to work either.. (i also get agressive with team sports) and finally stuff like fitness or yoga.. well i simply don’t have anyone to go with because everyone either lives far away or already do something else

  • I was really into running until I got heatstroke and shin splints. I was planning on getting back into it this summer but the excessive heat and COVID-19 pandemic got in the way of that.

  • I do bouldering, climbing and parkour (I also do indoor snowboarding once every 2-4 months). It’s always exciting, fun and satisfying so I end up exercising 4-6 times a week!

  • Ha I sold my car sometime ago, so now I will have to ride my bike everywhere I want to go. I still hate it, but I have to go to work, bring my kids to school, do my groceries, on my bike, there is simply no choice ������

  • Square dancing is AMAZING exercise! It’s incredibly fun, has many levels that can challenge your brain, and includes socializing! If you can walk and listen, you can square dance!!!

  • I make coffee with around 780 mg of caffeine. I drink that first thing in the morning. Usually I go for 400 mg.

    That helps with everything else.
    It makes my exercise routine feel way better!

    I don’t take ADD meds anymore due to the stigma around them. I have no issue with drugs. I do have an issue with being labeled a drug addict.

    The funny thing is caffeine is the same type of drug as amphetamines.

    Caffeine is to amphetamines what codeine is to opiates.

  • I’ve been watching some of your videos over the past week or so and found them incredibly comforting, yet to go and officially get my ADHD diagnosis though I imagine it will be quick since both my brother and mother have ADHD, just gutted it took me 27 years to realise I’m not just a lazy idiot (As if someone with 2 post graduate degrees should feel like an idiot) But my comment was in relation to linking this video with your other video on gamification, I hate exercise (motivation) and I love it (when I actually get round to doing it!) one thing that helped was literally gamefying it me and my partner started playing Ring-fit on the Switch and its amazing!

  • Before a car accident I was a competitive marathoner (the hyper-focus got me to the point where I was working to qualify for the olympic trials when the accident happened). I remember that the hyperactivity symptoms went way down. This was long before I knew that I had this issue. The hyperactivity was way down but of course I still had the racing thoughts, constant forgetfulness, sleepless nights, etc. I’m very thankful for a great doctor and my supplements. Life is far better now, but of course it’s still a struggle. Hence, why I’m a subscriber 😉 I’m starting to actually learn about this condition from you. I’ll stick around until I learn manage things better. But yeah I’ll be taking those supplements for the rest of my life most likely. I’m a huge tennis fan, so I perked up when you mentioned tennis:D
    Thankfully I can still walk and lift weights some, but it doesn’t have the same effect b/c there’s a tradeoff between severe pain and workout intensity. If I were still competing, I doubt I’d need the anxiety supplement.

  • I’m a high schooler with ADHD. I got into sports as a way to get some exercise and those sweet, sweet, brain parties. Then, hopefully, I would be able to do my homework for once, but now that I am doing sports, I don’t have any time to do homework.

  • My suggestion, take a class of some sort. People tell you what to do so you dont have to plan, you make friends there so they hold you accountable. All you have to do is show up

  • I love to blast my music and walk for about an hour every day in the evening. Mainly, I make sure to get at least 10,000 steps daily (normally a bit more).

  • I’m not diagnosed with ADHD but a lot of my immediate family has it. My mom, brothers, and I’m pretty sure my father have it. I have a lot of symptoms of adhd, I struggle so much.

  • This brain training game “nonu amazing only” (Google it) is just wonderful! It`s been several weeks since I started out playing the game and I found advancements in my reaction time and memory. As being a sufferer of dyslexia, the game helped me do my everyday tasks at home and work efficiently. Great for working your brain and keeping it active. I find this game exciting.

  • Thanks to exercise I don’t feel depressed anymore, when I am really tired. This means, that when I am not tired, I am calm and happy.

  • this is VERY true. I use to get depressed, since I have been working out 5 times a day, there is no more depression. Even when something goes wrong in my day, I might thing negative for a short period of time but it does not stick. I also have changed my diet too.   

  • I agree with exercising helps with depression. Harmful medications is no the solution and psychiatrist should be banned from society.

  • Home gyms can prove very useful for people who do not have the time to go to a gym. However, for creating that inspiring effect in the room, it is very important to know the right layout.
    Read more………… https://ellipticalr.com/

  • yeah. i’m realizing more and more that with the asswipes i’m presently stuck with being around I DESPERATELY NEED TO EXERCISE EVERY DAY TO KEEP FROM LOSING MY FRICKIN’ MIND!!!!!

  • Thanks for this informative overview of the links between exercise and brain health. For further information about the benefits of exercise for older adults, this article is helpful: https://gracehomecare.com/benefits-of-exercise-on-the-brain/

  • this is what i call the dumbest part of the internet. im sure i could find better things in porn. if for a word to work search. this is not what i was fucking looking ffs. fuck off with this shit pls

  • This is lots of help! I used it to help me with my homework �� I will recommend this to anyone who wants to know why exercise is good for your brain! ��