6 Ideas to Keep Spring Allergic reactions From Sabotaging Workouts

 

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6 Tips to Keep Spring Allergies From Sabotaging Workouts. PAY ATTENTION TO THE POLLEN COUNT. The pollen count refers to the particles of pollen per cubic meter of air; the higher the pollen count, the SHIFT YOUR SCHEDULE.

RETHINK YOUR ROUTE. CHOOSE THE RIGHT WORKOUT. KEEP IT CLEAN. Avoid Mid-Day Exercise: You may have to reschedule your “runch” (running lunch break) to morning or evening until spring allergy season passes. Experts say that most pollen in urban areas hits peak levels around noon, or shortly thereafter.

Also, be warned, pollen is going to be peskiest on warm, dry and breezy days. Keep windows and doors closed to minimize exposure to outdoor allergens. Wash you bed sheets and pillowcases weekly to decrease dust mites.

Take a shower. For those who love exercising outdoors, there are ways to reduce the side effects, says Timothy Craig, D.O., professor of medicine and pediatrics at Penn State University’s Hershey Medical Center Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology. Continue to breathe easy and workout hard, by soaking up these strategies. Allergy-Proof Your Workout. 1. Find the source.

Limit your exposure to indoor allergens to help reduce the severity of your spring allergies. Vacuum your furniture, leave your shoes by the door, shower often, cover floors with washable throw rugs, and use a dehumidifier and an air purifier with a HEPA filter. If your allergy medications don’t provide sufficient relief, consider allergy shots.

Choose the right time of day for your workouts Pollen is the most common allergen. One of the efficient ways to deal with it is to know what hours of the day pollen counts are high. The biggest concentration in the air is in the morning, which is why you should avoid those hours, and shift your workout session for later. Keep windows closed and use the air conditioner to clear the air even more. Consider using a nasal spray (saline) to clear allergens from your nose.

Exercise is an important component of a healthy lifestyle. While allergies may be a nuisance, there are lots of options for working your workouts. Spring allergies impact around 50 million Americans, with many of these treated with antihistamines or other prescription medications. Springtime allergies, which usually involve symptoms of hay fever and sinus infections, differ from anaphylactic food allergies, which are significantly more seriousIf you dread the spring because the flowers make you sneeze and fill your sinuses with pressure. Delegate lawn mowing, weed pulling and other gardening chores that stir up allergens.

Remove clothes you’ve worn outside and shower to rinse pollen from your skin and hair. Don’t hang laundry outside — pollen can stick to sheets and towels. Wear a pollen mask if you do outside chores.

Try to keep your house as pollen-free as possible. The room where this is particularly important is the bedroom, as that’s where your child spends the most time. If possible, try to keep your child out of his bedroom during the day (move the fun toys somewhere else) and have him bathe before bed.

Be thoughtful about outside time.

List of related literature:

Avoiding exercise during the coldest and driest part of the day, or exercising indoors in a more controlled environment with fewer allergens or pollutants, may also reduce the risk of EIB.

“The Biophysical Foundations of Human Movement” by Bruce Abernethy, Stephanie J. Hanrahan, Vaughan Kippers, Laurel T. Mackinnon, Marcus G. Pandy
from The Biophysical Foundations of Human Movement
by Bruce Abernethy, Stephanie J. Hanrahan, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2005

• Antihistamines/intranasal steroids: Both will help athletes who have underlying allergic rhinitis.

“Netter's Sports Medicine E-Book” by Christopher Madden, Margot Putukian, Eric McCarty, Craig Young
from Netter’s Sports Medicine E-Book
by Christopher Madden, Margot Putukian, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

To overcome allergy, increased awareness is the key.

“Allergies Disease in Disguise: How to Heal Your Allergic Condition Permanently and Naturally” by Carolee Bateson-Koch
from Allergies Disease in Disguise: How to Heal Your Allergic Condition Permanently and Naturally
by Carolee Bateson-Koch
Books Alive, 2003

If possible, athletes should schedule exercise to avoid the coolest time of the day since cold air carries less water content, high pollen time for those with coexistent allergies and high pollution times.

“Allergy and Asthma: Practical Diagnosis and Management” by Massoud Mahmoudi
from Allergy and Asthma: Practical Diagnosis and Management
by Massoud Mahmoudi
Springer International Publishing, 2016

Antihistamines are partially effective at preventing exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

“Pediatric Emergency Medicine Secrets E-Book” by Steven M. Selbst, Kate Cronan
from Pediatric Emergency Medicine Secrets E-Book
by Steven M. Selbst, Kate Cronan
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

If you have bad airborne allergies, start slowly and work up to 1 tsp daily.

“Healing Multiple Sclerosis: Diet, Detox & Nutritional Makeover for Total Recovery” by Ann Boroch, Ann Louise Gittleman, PH.D., CNS
from Healing Multiple Sclerosis: Diet, Detox & Nutritional Makeover for Total Recovery
by Ann Boroch, Ann Louise Gittleman, PH.D., CNS
Quintessential Healing, 2011

• Try to exercise indoors during peak allergy, pollen, and air pollution times.

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Individuals with asthma, eczema, or hay fever are at greater relative risk of experiencing anaphylaxis at rest or during exercise.

“Physical Activity and Health” by Claude Bouchard, Steven N. Blair, William L. Haskell
from Physical Activity and Health
by Claude Bouchard, Steven N. Blair, William L. Haskell
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2012

Landry GL: Exercise-induced anaphylaxis and urticaria.

“Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book” by Randall L. Braddom
from Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book
by Randall L. Braddom
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Up to 30–60% of patients with atopic dermatitis will go on to develop asthma and 35–66% will go on to develop allergic rhinitis (Lewin Group).

“Pediatric Primary Care Case Studies” by Catherine Burns, Beth Richardson, Margaret Brady
from Pediatric Primary Care Case Studies
by Catherine Burns, Beth Richardson, Margaret Brady
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Alexia Lewis RD

Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Heath Coach who believes life is better with science, humor, and beautiful, delicious, healthy food.

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2 comments

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  • When I step outside my eyes start to water and my throat is beginning to get scratchy.

    Really annoying when I’m trying not to touch my face and not cough to be polite and avoiding illness.

  • I have these annoying “spring allergies” and I feel like people around me think that I have the Coronavirus also known as Covid2019